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PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

SCOTTISH HISTORY SOCIETY 

VOLUME XLII 

CHARTULARY OF LINDORES ABBEY 



JULY 1903 



CHARTULARY 

OF THE 

ABBEY OF LINDORES 

1195-1479 



Edited from the Original Manuscript at Caprington 
Castle, Kilmarnock, with Translation and Abstracts of 
the Charters, Illustrative Notes, and Appendices, by 

THE RIGHT REV. JOHN DOWDEN, D.D. 

BISHOP OF EDINBURGH 




EDINBURGH 

Printed at the University Press by T. and A. CONSTABLE 

for the Scottish History Society 

1903 



LIBRARY * 




PREFACE 

THE Scottish History Society is indebted to Colonel J. A. S_ 
Cuninghame, of Caprington Castle, Kilmarnock, for permission 
to print the text of the Chartulary, and to photograph the 
specimen pages which appear in this volume. The editor has 
to add his thanks to Colonel Cuninghame for personally verify- 
ing some doubtful readings after the manuscript had been 
returned to Caprington. The thanks 'of the Society and of 
the editor are due to Mr, Alexander Gibb'j'&S.A. (Scot.), for 
the observations on place-names and persons wBich he has 
been so good as to furnish to the Notes and Illustrations ; and 
to Mr. William Rae Macdonald, F.S.A. (Scot.), for his valuable 
Appendix on the Seals of Lindores, and for procuring the 
impressions of the seals which have been photographed and 
are here reproduced. 

In the course of this work acknowledgment is made of the 
obliging services of several gentlemen who have aided the 
editor in elucidating points of more or less difficulty. The 
editor's special thanks are due to a distinguished charter and 
record scholar, who, so long as health allowed him, was un- 
failing in his help, but who has forbidden the mention of hi& 
name. This gentleman's labours unfortunately extended to 
only the earlier charters of the volume. Subsequently the 
editor has enjoyed the invaluable assistance rendered by Dr. 
J. Maitland Thomson, Curator of the Historical Department 
of H.M. General Register House. The editor has been, he 
fears, barefaced and unblushing in his demands; but Dr. 
Thomson's generosity has condoned his innumerable impor- 



vi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

tunities. Mr. J. T. Clark, Keeper of the Advocates' Library, 
was so good as to assist both with wise counsel and the loan 
of books in regard to the difficult task of verifying the author- 
ities cited in the ' Legal Opinion ' (No. CXLIX.), which was 
a line of research quite outside the circle of the editor's 
ordinary studies. The editor is also under innumerable 
obligations to Dr. T. G. Law, Secretary of the Society. 

The editor in the course of many years has had frequent 
struggles with printers, who for the most part like to follow 
their own ways rather than those of the authors whose 'copy' 
they are employed to set up. But in the present case he is 
compelled to acknowledge that he has been saved from many 
an error by the intelligent and keen proof-reading, both of 
the Latin and the English, in the office of the Edinburgh 
University Press. 

The Index has been prepared by Mr. Alex. Mill of the 
Signet Library. 

One of the most delightful of the compensations for labours, 
such as those demanded by the task now brought to a con- 
clusion, is the vivid sense of brotherly fellowship created by 
the ready generosity of others engaged in similar lines of 
research. And, if he may trust his own feelings, the editor 
is certain that he is not justly liable to a Sl/crj d^apto-rla^, 
should the Court of Session, like the judicatories of ancient 
Athens, entertain such an action at law. 

J. D. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



INTRODUCTION, . . . xiii-xcv 

THE CHARTULARY 

i. Carta Comitis Dauid de Rege Willelmo, ... 1 

ii. Magna Carta Comitis Dauid de fundacione Monastery, 2 
HI. Carta Comitis Dauid de Ecclesiis de Lundors, de 

Dunde, et de Garuiach, ..... 7 

iv. Carta Comitis Dauid de terris ecclesiarum de Garuiach, 9 

v. Carta Comitis Dauid de Culsamuel et Munkegin, . 10 

vi. Carta Comitis Dauid de Redinch, . ..11 

vii. Carta Comitis Dauid de Quarrario, . . . . 12 

vin. Carta Comitis Dauid de Wicheston, etc., . . . 12 
ix. Confirmacio Comitis Dauid de Carucata terre de 

Balemawe, . . . . . . . . 13 

x. Confirmacio Comitis Dauid de terra de Neutyl, . 14 

xi. Carta Comitis Dauid de ecclesia de Wissindene, . 15 

xii. Duplicacio carte de Wissendene, . . . . 15 

xin. Carta Comitis Dauid de ecclesia de Cuningtoun, . 16 

xiv. Duplicacio carte de Cuningtoun, . . . . 17 

xv. Confirmacio Comitis Johannis de terra de Lundors et 

de Garuiach et de earum ecclesiis, . . . 18 
xvi. Carta Comitis Johannis de quadam terra in territorio 

de Lundors, ....... 20 

xvn. Carta Comitis Johannis de xx t! solidis in Inueruri, . 20 
xvni. Carta Comitis Johannis de toftis de Inuerbervyn et 

Inuerrury, . . . . . . . . 21 

xix. Carta Comitis Johannis de tofto in Dunde et de per- 

ambulacione de Durnach et de libertate molendini, 22 
xx. Littere Comitis Johannis de Solucione secundarum 

decimarum, ....... 24 

xxi. Littere Comitis Johannis de Solucione secundarum 

decimarum de Garuiach, ..... 24 

xxn. Carta Domini Regis Alexandri de Westere fedale, . 25 



viii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

PAGE 

xxin. Recognicio diuisarum de Westere fedale, . 26 

xxiv. Carta Domini fergusii de fedal pro secundis decimis, 27 

xxv. Confirmacio Comitis Roberti de fedale, etc., . . 28 

xxvi. Carta domini fergusii de Beny et concrag, . 29 

xxvn. Confirmacio Comitis Roberti de terra de Beny et 

concrage, ....... 30 

XXVIH. Carta Domini fergusii de Cotken, etc.., . . . 31 
xxix. Carta de Rathengoten de malisio tilio ferteth, . 32 
xxx. Confirmacio Comitis Gilberti de Ratengothen, . 33 
xxxi. Confirmacio Comitis Roberti de Rathengothen, . 34 
xxxn. Confirmacio fergusii de Ratengothen, ... 34- 
xxxin. Capitulum Dunkeldense de Rathengothen, . . 35 
xxxiv. Confirmacio H. Episcopi Dunkeldensis de Rathen- 
gothen, ........ 36 

xxxv. Confirmacio Comitis Malisij generalis de Strathern 

et Hure, ... .... 37 

xxxvi. Carta Ade filie Comitis de Balemagh, . . . 38 

xxxvn. Carta Willelmi Wascelyn de terra de Newetyl, . 38 

xxxviii. Dauid de Sancto Michaele de tofto in munros, . 40 

xxxix. Confirmacio Roberti Griffyn de terra de Newtil, . 41 

XL. Carta Domine Ysabelle de Cragyn, . . . 41 

XLI. Confirmacio Domini Roberti de Brus de Cragyn, . 42 
XLII. Carta principals de terra de Eglesmagril, et de 
ecclesia eiusdem uille, et de decimis de 

Cletheueis, 43 

XLI ii. Carta Comitis Gilberti de excercitu faciendo pro 

Eglesmagril, ....... 46 

XLIV. Confirmacio Comitis Roberti de exercitu pro egles- 

magril, . .... 47 

XLV. De ecclesia de eglesmagril, .... 48 

XLVI. Quieta clamacio Coneueti de Eglesmagril, . . 49 

XLVII. Quieta clamacio Coneueti de Eglesmagril, . . 50 

XLVIII. Quieta clamacio Coneueti de Eglesmagril, . . 50 

XLIX. Confirmacio E. prioris de Incheaffran de Cletheueys, 51 

L. Sentencia Judicum Delegatorum Auctoritate 

Domini Pape super Eglesmagril, ... 52 
LI. Confirmacio dementis episcopi Dumblanensis de 

Eglesmagril, ...... 54 

LII. Confirmacio Cleri Dumblanensis de Eglesmagril, . 55 

mi. Confirmacio capituli Dumblanensis de Eglesmagril, 57 

LIV. Composicio super decimis de fedal, Beny etConcragh, 59 



CONTENTS 



IX 



LV. 

LVI. 

LVII. 
LVIII. 

LIX. 
LX. 

LXI. 
LXII. 
LXIII. 

LXIV. 

LXV. 

LXVI. 

LXVII. 

LXVIII. 

LXIX. 

LXX. 

LXXI. 

LXXII. 

LXXIII. 

LXXIV. 

LXXV. 

LXXVI. 

LXXVII. 

LXXVIII. 

LXX1X. 

LXXX. 

LXXXI. 

LXXXII. 

LXXXIII. 

LXXX1V. 

LXXXV. 

LXXXVI. 

LXXXVII. 

LXXXV II I. 

LXXXIX. 

xc. 

XCI. 



De terra resignata quara Willelmus de Brechin 

perambulavit de terra ecclesie de Rathmuriel, . 60 

De terra de Ederlarg, 6l 

Detholachkereetdesecundisdecimis,S.deGarentuly, 6*2 

De Capella de Cremond, .... 64 

De Capella de Weredors, ..... 65 

De firma 66 

Confirmacio domini Wilelmi de Brechyn ... . 67 

De Capella domini Willelmi de Brechyn de Luiidors, 68 
Ordinacio Episcopi Sancti Andree super capella 

de Dundemor, .... 69 

Ornamenta capelle de Dundemor, . 71 

De tofto in Munorgrund, 72 

De tofto theodorici quondam tinctoris de Perth, . 73 

De celario de Perth, 73 

[De Terra in Forgrund], ..... 74 

De dimidia petra cere firmitatis Rogeri de Berkeley, 75 

De Warenna, 76 

Warenna de tribus acris iuxta Eglesmagrill, . 77 

De Warenna, ....... 78 

Conan de Bosco, ....... 79 

Kinespinedyn de terra in Perth, .... 80 

Willelmus de Munford de sicco alleci, . . . 81 

De piscaria de Glasbani et Rugesablyn, . . 81 

De decima piscarie de Glasbani et de Rugesablun, 82 

De tercia parte piscarie, ..... 83 

De decima recium, ...... 84 

De Logydurnach, 85 

Donacio patronatus ecclesie de Lesselyn,, . . 88 
Confirmacio comitis Dauid super donacione patro- 
natus ecclesie de Lesslyn, .... 89 
Ratificacio filij de ecclesia Lesselyn super donacione 

patris, 90 

[De Johanne filio Thome de MalindJ, . . 90 

[De Tofto in Inuerkaithin], ..... 91 

De j marca in Hamildun, ..... 92 

De iij marcis de Stokes in comitatu leycestre, . 93 

94 

De Tofto in Dunde, 95 

De tofto in Dunde, et de perambulacione de Durnach, 97 

De manso iuxta ecclesiam de Cullessy, . . 98 



x THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

PAGE 

xcir. De vicariis qui molestauerunt locum nostrum, . 99 

xcin. Magnum priuilegium Celestini de exempcione, . 102 

xciv. Magnum priuilegium Innocencii tercij, . . .107 

xcv. De Bonis in Strathern Innocencius tercius, . . 112 

xcvi. Confirmaciocomposicionis super ecclesiisdeGaruiach, 114 

xcvu. De composicione terrarum ecclesiarum de Garuiach, 115 

xcvm. De ecclesia de Dunde et aliis bonis, . . .116 

xcix. Super ecclesia de Dunde de mutacione Keledeorum, 117 

c. Super ecclesia de Dunde de mutacione Keledeorum, 118 

ci. Confirmacio generalis Innocencij quarti, . . 119 

en. De Pensione de Wissindene, . . . .120 

cm. Contra inuasores et detentores bonorum, . . 122 
civ. Conseruatorium de Londors, . . . . 1 23 

cv. De episcopis Abirdonensis ecclesie quimolestauerunt 

locum nostrum, . . . . . .124 

cvi. Item de eisdem episcopis Abirdoiiensibus, . . 126 
cvn. De confirmacione Ecclesie de Lundoris, . . 128 

cvni. Item de eadem ecclesia, . . . . .130 

cix. De Eadem Ecclesia, . . . . . .131 

ex. Item de eadem ecclesia, . . . . .132 

cxi. De bosco capiendo in Glenlithere in Stratherne, . 133 
cxn. Joachim de Kynbuc super bosco capiendo in Cure- 

lundyn, .135 

cxm. Carta domini Roberti de Campaniis, . . .137 
cxiv. De conuencione facta inter abbatem et conuentum 

de Lundores et Willelmum de Brechyn, . . 142 
cxv. De Inirberwyn, . . . . . . .145 

cxvi. De Villa Willelmi in Garuiach. Nota eciam de 

secundis decimis, 145 

cxvii. Item de eadem terra Willelmi, de Letgauen, de 
Wrangham, et de terra de Bondes. Item nota 

de secundis decimis, 147 

CXVHI. De donacione Henrici de Hastinges de Flandres, . 148 
cxix. De Confirmacione de Flandris, . . . .150 

cxx. De confirmacione a prima fundacione, . . .150 
rxxi. Item de confirmacione, . . . . . .151 

cxxii. De mandate Regis Alexaiidri, . . . .152 

cxxni. De conuencione facta inter abbatem conuentum de 

Lundores et Gocelinum de Balliolo, . . 152 

cxxiv. De x marcis in Kelle in Buchan, . . . .155 

cxxv. De Multura de Kynard, . . . . .158 



CONTENTS 



XI 



CXXVI. 
CXXVII. 
CXXVIII. 

CXXIX. 

cxxx. 

CXXXI. 
CXXXII. 

CXXXIII. 



CXXXIV. 

cxxxv. 



<:xxxvn. 
<"xxxvin. 

CXXXIX. 
CXL. 

CXLI. 
CXLII. 

CXLIII. 

CXLIV. 

CXLV. 

CXLVI. 

CXLVII. 

CXLVIII. 

CXLIX. 

CL. 

CLI. 

CLII. 
CLIII. 

CLIV. 



PAGE 

De Kynmuk, de Balbuthan, et de Hathirwych, . lt)3 

[De ecclesia de Moethel], 165 

De una marca quam dedit nobis Radulphus de 

Lascellis, 165 

De flandres, .167 

. . 168 

Carta ecclesie de Cullessy, . 169 

De confirmacione regis Alexandri, . . . 171 
De amicabili composicione inter Abraham Episco- 

pum Dunblanensem et Guidonem abbatem [de 

Lundors], 172 

[De susteiitacione monachorum de Lundors], . 173 
Liberum chymnachium per totam terrain Domini 

R. de Quincy, . . . . . . .175 

Carta Elene de Brechyn de loco concesso pro petis 

Abbatis | de ij porciunculis terre de Kyndloch, 176 
Carta Super brueram in mora de Kyndloche et 

petera de Monegrey, . . . . .178 
Carta Willelmi regis Scocie, . . . . 181 

Johannes de Scocia, 183 

Cokeburn super diuisione terre de Collelessy et 

Cardynside, . . . . . . .184 

Carta super ecclesia de Cullessi, . . . .187 

Concessio in husus proprios Ecclesie de Cowlessi 

per episcopum, . . . . . .189 

Resignacio ecclesie de Cowlessy per Rectorem, . 190 
Confirmacio Capituli S. A. super ecclesia de C., . 191 
Recepcio litere resignacioiiis ecclesie de Cowlessy 

per episcopum Sancti Andree, . . .192 

Confirmacio alia super ecclesia de Cowlessy, . 194 

De protectione regis Dauid, . . . .196 
De Contrauersia inter nos et dominum Thomam 

Comitem de Mar, . . . . . .199 

Dauid Comes de Hunthyngton, . . . . 200 

Casus, 212 

Carta terre seu tenement! quondam Magistri 

Thome Rossy jacentis in nouo burgo, . . 216 
De Nouo Burgo, ....... 220 

Instrumentum Saysine terre quondam Magistri 

Thome Rossy Jacentis in nouo burgo, . . 224 
[Fragmentum Instrument! Publici], . . . 226 



xii CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS, 229-283 



PAGE 



APPENDICES 

i. The Earliest known Writ connected with Lindores, . 284- 

ii. Description of the MS. by J. Maitland Thomson, LL.D., 
Curator of the Historical Department of H.M. 
General Register House, ..... 286 

in. A Clue-Catalogue of some Charters and other Writs, 

relating to Lindores, not found in the Chartulary, . 287 

iv. An Attempt to ascertain the Succession of the Abbots 
of Lindores, with Occasional Notes on some Events 
connected with the History of the Abbey, . . 301 

v. The Legal Authorities cited in the ' Opinions,' CXLIX., CL., 314- 
vi. Le Liure des trois filz de roys, etc., .... 325 

vn. Notes 011 Seals connected with Lindores Abbey, by 

W. Rae Macdonald, with Engravings of Nine Seals, 327 

INDEX, . . 333 

ILLUSTRATIONS- 

PHOTOGRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS OF THE MANUSCRIPTS 

No. XCIV., .... . .108 

No. CXXV., . .160 

No. CXXXVI., . . 176 

ENGRAVINGS OF NINE SEALS, . . . 332. 



INTRODUCTION 

THE transformation of Scotland in its political, civil, social, 
and ecclesiastical aspects, accomplished by Anglo-Norman 
influence during the course of the twelfth century, was wide in 
extent and far-reaching in its consequences. It has indeed no 
parallel in the history of the kingdom. Confining our view to 
the changes which took place in the organisation and life of 
the Church, we find the century opening with the ancient 
Celtic Church of the country in a stage of advanced decrepi- 
tude, feeble in its energies, relaxed in discipline, and largely 
denuded of its temporal possessions. There was but one 
episcopal see, that of the * episcopus Scottorum,' situated at 
St. Andrews, and hopelessly incapable of exercising a com- 
petent supervision over a diocese (if we may use that term) as 
extensive as the whole mainland of Scotland. At the close of 
the century the entire country was sub-divided and portioned 
out into no less than eleven effective bishoprics. Dunkeld was 
reconstituted and Moray founded as early, perhaps, as 1107. 
Glasgow, Galloway, Ross, Caithness, and Aberdeen followed 
in quick succession. The erection of Dunblane and Brechin 
marked the middle of the century, and after an interval of 
some fifty years the tale was completed by the sub-division 
of the diocese of Dunkeld, and the creation of a new see, that 
of Lismore or Argyll, out of its western district. Cathedral 
churches some of them noble and stately specimens of the 
genius and craftsmanship of the builders of the day rose as 
visible tokens of the Church's growing wealth and power. 
Each, with its chapter of canons and staff of vicars, became a 



xiv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

centre of civilising influence in the region in which it was 
placed. 

Following close on the erection of the early bishoprics was 
the establishment of the parochial system, hitherto unknown, 
with its grouping of parishes for disciplinary purposes into 
archdeaconries and ' deaneries of Christianity/ Before the 
close of the twelfth century the organisation of the Scottish 
Church and its secular clergy was indistinguishable, save for 
the lack of a metropolitan, from that of the Church of 
England. 

Not less remarkable was the rapid spread of new monastic 
establishments throughout the country. The ancient Celtic 
Church in Scotland had indeed in its origin been essentially 
monastic in character; but in the course of centuries its energy 
had failed ; its missionary zeal was extinct ; it was suffering 
from internal decay. Its weakness had yielded to the greed of 
the great landowners ; its possessions were to a large extent 
alienated ; and such little as remained was handed down by 
hereditary descent in petty communities of married ecclesi- 
astics, who were the representatives in law of the early monas- 
teries of the Church of St. Columba. Such a state of things 
did nothing to satisfy the religious conceptions of the English 
settlers and Norman knights who crowded into Scotland in 
the reigns of Alexander and David, and whose influence with 
these monarchs was dominant. The sons of St. Margaret had 
inherited her love for the ecclesiastical arrangements of the 
southern kingdom. Their intimate relations with the English 
court made them keenly sensible of the painful contrast pre- 
sented by the state of the Church in their own country. The 
vigour and beneficent labours of the great monastic houses of 
England and Normandy could not have failed to impress 
them ; and they resolved that Scotland should participate in 
what was then universally regarded as the most exalted form 
of religious devotion. 

We need not here delay to investigate the causes, but the 



INTRODUCTION xv 

fact is unquestionable that piety and religious zeal among the 
wealthy and powerful of that day took shape in the erection 
and endowment of monasteries. Excluding from consideration 
the houses of the mendicant orders of friars, the great monas- 
teries of Scotland, and, with a few unimportant exceptions, 
even those of secondary rank, can trace their foundation to the 
twelfth, and earlier years of the thirteenth, century. As 
founders, the kings and other members of the royal family 
led the way ; and they were speedily followed by the great 
nobles, whose power and influence were at that period scarcely 
inferior to those of the Crown. Alexander i. erected the 
houses of Canons Regular at Scone, Loch Tay, and Inchcolm. 
To his successor, David, are to be attributed the monasteries 
some of them of the first importance of St. Andrews 
(Priory), Dunfermline (new foundation), Selkirk (soon to be 
transferred to Kelso), Jedburgh, Holyrood, Newbottle, Cam- 
buskenneth, Urquhart, the May, and Kinloss. The great 
lords of Galloway founded Dundrennan, Soulseat, Lincluden, 
Glenluce, St. Mary's Isle, Tongland, and Whithern (new 
foundation). Walter Fitz-Alan, the Steward, established the 
great abbey of Paisley, and the house of Mauchline, after- 
wards attached to Melrose. Dryburgh and Kilwynning were 
due to Hugh de Morville, the Constable; Coldstream and 
Eccles to the Earl of Dunbar. Other foundations will be 
referred to hereafter. 

The wave of religious zeal, which in this form was distinctly 
of Anglo-Norman origin, does not seem at first to have largely 
affected the Scottish Earls north of the water of Forth. There 
are many indications of their instinctive jealousy of English 
ideas and English ways. It could not be with unmingled 
satisfaction that they witnessed the settlement of English 
monks from Canterbury at Dunfermline, from Pontefract 
at Scone, from Rievaulx at Melrose and Dundrennan, from 
Wenlock at Paisley, and from Alnwick at Dryburgh. In the 
council of the king they had formidable and generally sue- 



xvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

cessful rivals in the Anglo-Norman knights who were filling 
so many of the great offices of state. And it would seem that 
the Church in like manner was now being handed over to the 
control of Anglo-Norman ecclesiastics. The castles of the 
Anglo-Norman laymen seemed to have their counterparts in 
the monasteries garrisoned with monks from south of Scot- 
land. At any rate, for some time the great nobles of the 
north did not lend themselves to this new form of piety. 1 
After a generation or two the feeling of distrust wore off. 

Earl David, the founder of the Abbey of Lindores, came of 
a family especially addicted to this form of pious munificence. 
We have seen something of the profuse liberality in this 
direction of his grandfather, David i. His father, Prince 
Henry, though cut off in the years of early manhood, had 
time, some two years before his death, to erect the monastery 
of Holmcultram. His brothers, Malcolm, ' the Maiden,' and 
William, ' the Lion, 1 can each be credited with the erection of 
a famous house : the former founded the Cistercian Abbey 
of Cupar in Angus ; the latter, the splendid and richly endowed 
Benedictine Abbey of Arbroath; while his mother, the 
Countess Ada, had founded the Cistercian nunnery at Had- 
dington. 2 

At the latest, early in the year 1195, the first abbot had 
been chosen for the new foundation at Lindores. 3 This fact 
is known to us through an original charter preserved in the 
collection known as the 'Campbell Charters'* (xxx. 16), in 



1 Earl Duncan's nunnery at North Berwick can scarcely be reckoned an 
exception. But an exception is found in the small Benedictine House at Fyvie 
(afterwards a cell of Arbroath), erected by Fergus, Earl of Buchan, in 1179. 

2 His sister-in-law, Queen Ermengard, widow of William, at a later period, 
joined her son, Alexander n., in founding the Abbey of Balmerino, on the 
southern shores of the Tay, some eight miles east of Lindores. 

3 Reasons are given in Appendix IV. (p. 302) for believing that Guido, the 
first abbot, was appointed as early as 1191, though he may not have received 
' benediction ' for sometime. In the Campbell Charter we find Guido only 
'electum in abbatem ' ; while the bull of Celestine m. (8th March 1195), is 
addressed ' abbati et fratribus,' etc. 



INTRODUCTION xvii 

the library of the British Museum. It is somewhat earlier 
than the earliest writ directly connected with Lindores in our 
Chartulary ; and the reader owes its appearance here to the 
courtesy of Mr. J. Maitland Thomson, who not only called 
the attention of the editor to its existence, but was also 
so good as to transcribe it from the original. It may be 
added that a fragment of the seal remains attached. It is 
now reproduced (Appendix I.) for the first time, it is believed, 
in type. 

THE FOUNDER OF THE ABBEY OF LINDORES AND HIS FAMILY 
Earl David, the founder of the Abbey of Lindores, was the 
third and youngest son of Earl Henry, younger son of King 
David i. Earl Henry's elder brother Malcolm had met a 
violent death when a child, and Henry thus became the heir to 
the Scottish throne. He married in 1139 Ada, daughter of 
William, Earl of Warenne, second Earl of Surrey, and by her 
had six children, three sons and three daughters. Of the sons, 
Malcolm and William were successively kings of Scotland, and 
the third, the subject of this notice, became Earl of Hunting- 
don, by which title he is commonly known in history. 1 

Earl Henry's untimely death, in the flower of his youth, and 
possessed, as he was, of qualities well fitted to win and hold 
the affections of the people, plunged the whole nation into 
grief. He died, ' amid the lamentations of both the English 
and the Scots,' on 12th June 1152. He was buried in the 
Abbey of Kelso. Fordun describes him as particularly hand- 
some, of a kind and affectionate disposition, devout and pious, 
and most tender-hearted towards the poor ; and summing up 

1 The blunder which Fordun made in representing David as being William's 
elder brother (Chronica, lib. v. cap. 33, Skene's edit. p. 232) reappears in his 
Gesta Annalia ( i. and xii.) as written in 1363 ; but it was corrected in the 
revised form of 1385. (See Annalia, iv. and Ixxv. ; and Skene's note, Fordun, 
vol. ii. p. 426.) Fordun was himself evidently puzzled to account for David's 
not succeeding Malcolm on the throne, and attempts to explain the fact by 
asserting that David was at the time of Malcolm's death ' adhuc in partibus 
transmarinis. ' 

b 



xviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

his virtue, he declares him to have been in all respects like his 
father, only more attractive. 1 

The place of the burial of his father may have contributed 
to determine the choice of Earl David that the monks of his 
new foundation at Lindores should be ' de ordine Kelkoensi.' 
(Nos. IT. in.) 

As to the date of Earl David's birth, Sir Archibald H. 
Dunbar, who in the careful and laborious investigation of the 
chronology of the royal families of Scotland stands facile 
princeps, places it as 'about 1144*.' 2 This figure, which I 
believe is correct, is probably based upon a reasonable cor- 
rection of an allegation in Fordun's Chronicaf that of the 
three sons of Earl Henry, Malcolm was born in the eighteenth 
year of the reign of David i., Earl David in the nineteenth 
year, and William in the twentieth. The error that David 
was William's elder brother was, as we have seen, subsequently 
corrected. Making this correction, we are probably justified 
in substituting the name of David for that of William in the 
original passage where Fordun records the dates of the births 
of the three brothers. Now the twentieth year of the reign of 
David i. began on April 23, 1143 ; and accordingly Sir A. H. 
Dunbar has come sufficiently near when he places Earl David's 
birth as ' about 1144,' that is, to be precise, in the year ending 
April 23, 1144. But it would be foolish to look for exact 
precision. 

Authentic history has not much to tell of the life of Earl 
David, and little can now be done beyond piecing together in 
chronological order the brief notices which may be found 
scattered in the pages of the public records, of Fordun, the 
Chronicles of Melrose, Roger de Hoveden, and Walter de 
Coventry. 

If we may trust Fordun David was in England at the time 

1 Ut breviter omnes ejus virtutes commemorem, excepto quod paulo suavior 
fuit, per omnia patri similis. Chronica, lib. v. cap. 33 ; Skene's edit. i. 233. 

2 Scottish Kings, p. 65. 3 Lib. v. cap. 33. Vol. i. p. 233, ed. Skene. 






INTRODUCTION xix 

when his brother Malcolm ' the Maiden ' was causing serious 
discontent among his people by his neglect of his duties as king. 
David must have been then a mere youth. The first unquestion- 
able fact in his story is his visit in the train of his brother 
King William to the court of Henry n. at Windsor. This 
took place in the spring of the year 1170. The brothers spent 
Easter with the English king, and their stay in the south 
extended over several weeks, for on the octave of Whitsunday 
(Trinity Sunday, May 31) David received, after the manner of 
the time, the honour of knighthood from the hands of the 
King of England. During the visit of the royal brothers 
Henry 11. took a step fraught with the gravest consequences 
in the immediate future. He caused his son Henry to be 
crowned, and on the following day required King William and 
David to do homage, and on the relics of the saints to swear 
fealty to the newly crowned, with the reservation of fealty to 
himself. This homage was no doubt for possessions in England, 
of which more will be said hereafter. William during this 
visit made fruitless efforts to obtain from Henry the restoration 
of the earldom of Northumberland, and returned with much 
chagrin to his own kingdom. Two years later, when the 
younger Henry, supported by Louis of France and a formid- 
able array of English Barons, engaged in the great conspiracy 
against his father, William and Earl David joined the con- 
federacy on the conditions that if the plot were successful 
William should receive Northumberland as far as the Tyne, 
and David the fief of Huntingdon, and in addition (in aug- 
menturn) the whole of Cambridgeshire. 

King William's futile invasion of the north of England in 
1173, his renewed attack in the following year, his capture at 
Alnwick, and the unhappy treaty of Falaise are familiar facts 
of history. David had also taken an active part on behalf of 
the younger Henry. The castle of Huntingdon was held by 
Earl David against the old king. 1 After the capture of the 

1 Walter de Coventry, i. 216. 



xx THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

rebel Earl of Leicester David succeeded him in the command 
of his forces. He was engaged in military operations near 
Leicester when the news reached him of the capture of his 
brother at Alnwick, whereupon he immediately retreated with 
precipitation to Scotland. Shortly after his return, as security 
for the fulfilment of the terms of the treaty of Falaise, hostages 
from the great Scottish nobles were demanded. Of these the 
most distinguished was Earl David. 

After the release of King William consequent on the treaty 
of Falaise, we next find Earl David accompanying his brother, 
the king, to York, and there doing homage to the elder 
Henry, whose authority had been by this time safely secured. 

In 1179 Earl David accompanied King William, when with 
a large force he marched into Ross to quell a rebellious rising 
in that remote part of his dominions. The expedition was 
successful, and two fortresses were erected for maintaining the 
royal authority in that lawless district. 

In 1180 contentions of a less formidable kind demanded the 
consideration and intervention of the king. The monks of 
Melrose, whose possessions consisted largely of their vast flocks 
of sheep, had come into collision with the men of Wedale in 
regard to the boundaries of their respective pasture-lands. 
The dispute was brought to a close at Haddington in the 
presence of the king and Earl David. 1 

In the following year, according to the Chronicle of Melrose, 
' matters of business required that William, King of Scots, and 
Earl David his brother, should go to parts beyond sea, to King 
Henry, the elder. 1 The nature of the business does not appear. 
In the spring of 1185 the two brothers met the King of England 
in council at London, when the question of a new crusade for 
the relief of the Holy Land was under consideration. In the 
following year William and David again visited the court of 
Henry. It was on this occasion that Henry offered to the 



1 Chron. de Mailros, 



INTRODUCTION xxi 

unwilling King of Scots his future wife, Ermengard de 
Beaumont. 1 After consultation with his friends William (who 
aspired to a higher alliance) thought it prudent not to resist 
the wishes of the King of England. 

The next notice we have of Earl David is his appearance at 
the stately coronation of Richard i. at Westminster (3rd Sept. 
1189). In the splendid procession David, as Earl of Hunting- 
don, bore one of the three swords of state, the sword in the 
centre being carried by the king's brother, John, Earl of 
Moreton (afterwards King John), and that on the other side 
by Earl David's future brother-in-law, the Earl of Chester. 2 

On 24th June ] 190 Richard confirmed to Earl David in the 
amplest manner the liberties of the honour of Huntingdon. 3 
It was not till Earl David was well advanced in life that he 
took a wife. On Sunday, 26th August 1190, he was married 
to Matilda (Nos. u. in.) daughter of Hugh, Earl of Chester. 
This was a great alliance quite worthy of his station. By 
Matilda he had a family of (at least) three sons and three 
daughters, of whom more will be said hereafter. 

If any credence is to be given to the story of Earl David 
having accompanied Richard i. of England to the Crusade, 
told very circumstantially by Boece, it is at this point of the 
earl's history we must insert it. But as the story is connected 
in Boece's narrative with the founding of the Abbey of Lindores, 
it is proper that we should examine it in detail, and form 
some judgment on its credibility. This will be done in a 
separate section, and we here resume the chronicle of Earl 
David's life as it appears in authentic history. 

In 1194 we find David actively espousing the cause of King 
Richard in his struggle with John. In opposition to John's 
partisans, with the assistance of his wife's brother Ranulph, 



1 She is named in Charters n. and in. 

2 At Richard's second coronation at Winchester, King William of Scotland 
bore one of the swords of state. 

3 See the full abstract in Bain's Calendar, vol. i. No. 205. 



xxii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Earl of Chester, he is found engaged in the siege of Notting- 
ham. On 30th March in the same year he was present at a 
council held by Richard. 

John, on his accession to the throne of England, and 
after the arrangement of a truce with France, resolved to 
attempt a settlement of the claim made by King William to 
the northern border counties. To this end he despatched 
David, Earl of Huntingdon, with the Bishop of Durham and 
others of noble rank, bearing letters patent of safe-conduct 
for King William to come to meet him at Lincoln on the 
morrow of St. Edmund (21st November) 1200. William, ac- 
companied by the Earl of Huntingdon, attended on the day 
named. There in the presence of a remarkable assemblage of 
great prelates and nobles William did homage 'salvo jure 
suo,' and afterwards demanded the counties of Northumber- 
land, Cumberland, and Westmoreland. John put him off 
with the promise that he would return an answer at the 
following Whitsunday. 1 

There are some notices in Bain's Calendar, under the year 
1202, which reveal that Earl David had incurred debts to the 
Jews. 2 

In 1205 Earl David swore fealty to his nephew Alexander, 
the heir to the throne of Scotland, then a boy of seven years. 

In the summer of 1210 Earl David and his son Henry are 
found in Ireland, with several of his knights in attendance on 
King John. 3 In 1212 King John seems to have suspected the 
fidelity of Earl David, for he required from him his son John 
as a hostage. Among the English possessions of Earl David 
was the castle of Fotheringhay in Northamptonshire, the 
place where, after three centuries and a half, his unhappy 

1 William and Earl David on the same day assisted in honourable wise at the 
obsequies of Hugh, the great Bishop of Lincoln, and on 23rd November William 
set out on his return to Scotland. 

2 King William of Scotland was indebted some years later to Aaron, the Jew, 
of Lincoln, to the amount of 2776 lib. 

3 See Bain's Calendar, Nos. 475, 478, 479. 



INTRODUCTION xxiii 

descendant Mary, Queen of Scots, met her tragic death. 
King John demanded of the earl the surrender of this fortress, 
and gave commands that it should be at once besieged and 
taken, if there were any delay in yielding it. 1 Its restoration 
three years later is closely connected with one of the greatest 
events in the constitutional history of the English people. 
The English barons, among whom was the Earl of Hunt- 
ingdon, at length brought the king to bay. On 15th June 
the Great Charter was signed and sworn to by John. Less 
than a week later, on 21st June, John, still at Runnymede, 
signed the order for the restoration of Fotheringhay, together 
with the delivery of the earl's son and other hostages. 2 

It was probably the illness of King William which brought 
David to Scotland at the close of 1214. At any rate he 
appears to have been with his brother when he died at 
Stirling on 4th December. He was present at the crowning 
of Alexander at Scone, and accompanied the young king to 
attend the obsequies of his father. The chronicler tells us 
how Earl David met the body of William at the bridge 
of Perth, and how, dismounting from his horse, though 
now beset by age and infirmities, he insisted on lifting one 
arm of the bier upon his shoulder and acting for a while 
as bearer. He accompanied the funeral cortege to the 
appointed place of sepulture in the church of the abbey 
of Arbroath, and stood by the grave ' lamenting as became a 
brother. 13 

The lives of the brothers give every indication of genuine 
brotherly affection. And in this respect they present a happy 
contrast to the jealousy and strife exhibited in the family of 
Henry n. of England. 

Earl David survived his brother by four years. He died 
at Jerdelay (Yardley-Hastings in Northamptonshire), aged 
some seventy-five years, on Monday, 17th June 1219. On the 

1 It was surrendered. 2 Bain's Calendar, vol. i. No. 622. 

3 Fordun, Skene's edit., i. 281. 



xxiv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

day following his death he was buried in the abbey of Sautrey 
in Huntingdonshire, a foundation of Simon de St. Liz, a 
former Earl of Huntingdon. Fordun asserts that it had 
been David's desire to be interred in his own foundation of 
Lindores, but that ' on the advice of certain persons ' his wishes 
were not carried out. 1 This statement as having an air of 
probability has, I think, been universally accepted. But an 
entry in the Assize Roll of Huntingdon, which will be found 
summarised in Mr. Bain's invaluable Calendar' 2 ' dispels the 
illusion. A question of land-holding brought the abbot of 
Sautrey into court in April 1228. In the course of the pro- 
ceedings the abbot produced Earl David's will, in which, 
inter alia, he bequeathed his body to the church of St. Mary 
of Sautrey. 

According to Bower, Abbot of Inchcolm, in his additions 
to Fordun, Earl David had by his wife three sons. Of these 
Robert died young, and was buried at Lindores. 3 The next 
son is simply named as Henry, but nothing more is said of 
him. The name of the third son was John, 'called,' says 
Bower, ' by the English the Scot.' But we have to add that 
he styles himself ' Johannes de Scotia ' in many of the charters 
of our Chartulary. 4 Earl David resided chiefly on his English 
possessions, and perhaps the word ' the Scot' or ' of Scotland ' 
may have indicated that John had been born in Scotland. 
As John succeeded his father in the earldom, it may be 
assumed that Henry, like Robert, had died young. 

Among the ruins of the Abbey of Lindores there are now 
to be seen two small stone coffins placed in the choir of the 
abbey church, in front of the high altar. They are close 
together, and are said to occupy the exact position which 



1 Fordun, Skene's edit., i. 282. 2 Vol. i. No. 1000. 

3 Scotichronicon, lib. ix. cap. 27 (Goodall's edit. ii. p. 33). 

4 See Nos. xv. to xxi. inclusive. 



INTRODUCTION xxv 

they had when they were originally unearthed. They are 
carefully wrought. Each coffin is cut from a single block, and 
each has the circular recess for the head. The internal 
measurements give twenty-seven and a half inches as the length 
of one, and thirty and a half inches as the length of the 
other. The place of honour assigned to them falls in 
well with the natural suggestion that they had contained the 
remains of the children of the founder. Robert, we know, 
was buried in the abbey. 1 May not one of the coffins have 
been that of Henry ? 2 

The three daughters of Earl David by his wife made 
marriages suited to their high rank. Margaret, the eldest, 
was wife of Alan, Lord of Galloway. 3 Through the marriage 
of her daughter, Devorgulla, she was grandmother of John 
Balliol, King of Scotland. The second daughter, Isabella, 
married Robert Brus, Lord of Annandale. Her son Robert 
was one of the ' Competitors ' in 1291 ; and the grandson of 
the latter was Robert i. of Scotland. The third daughter, 
Ada, was wife of Henry de Hastynges. Her grandson John, 
was one of the ' Competitors.' 4 

Among the benefactors of Lindores is the founder's son, 
4 John of Scotland,' several charters of whom are transcribed 
in our Chartulary (Nos. xv. to xxi. inclusive, xc. and cxxxix.). 
David's daughter, Isabella de Brus, granted her messuage of 
Cragyn and other lands near Dundee (No. XL.) grants con- 
firmed by her son Robert, afterwards the ' Competitor' (No. 
XLI.). Another grandson of the founder, Henry de Hastynges, 
the son of his daughter Ada, granted his vill of Flanders in 



1 Scotichronicon (Hearne's edit.), lib. ix. cap. 27. 

2 Or, possibly, of David, who is named in Charter II. See the ground-plan 
of the abbey in Macgibbon and Ross's Ecclesiastical Architectiire of Scotland, 
vol. ii. p. 219, where the position of the coffins will be found marked just inside 
the entrance of the shallow choir. 

3 The marriage took place in 1209, Chron. de Mailros, s. a. 

4 For the genealogies see Dunbar's Scottish Kings, pp. 66-68. 



xxvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

the Garioch to the abbey in exchange for second tithes 
(No. cxvm.) ; while the Gocelin de Balliol, who appears in an 
agreement with the abbey in 1260 (No. cxxin.), was a brother 
of John de Balliol, presumably the husband of Devorgulla. 

John 6 of Scotland,' or ' the Scot,' succeeded his father as 
Earl of Huntingdon. On Whitsunday 1227 he received the 
honour of knighthood from King Alexander ; and on the 
death of his maternal uncle, the Earl of Chester, in 1232, he 
succeeded to the dignities of the great Palatine earldom. 
After that date he styles himself Earl of Chester and Hunt- 
ingdon. The Chartulary affords examples of his charters both 
before (Nos. xv., repeated in cxxxix., and xvi.) and after (Nos. 
XVIL, xviii., xix., xx., xxi., and xc.) his succession to Chester. 
He died 5th June 1237, without issue, and both his earldoms 
reverted to the English crown. Soon after the estates and 
dignities of the earldom of Chester became centred in the 
royal family. At a later period it was assigned to the eldest 
son of the King of England. As is well known, the title of 
Earl of Chester has long been borne by successive Princes of 
Wales. 1 

Beside the children by his marriage with Matilda, we 
possess evidence for the existence of three (perhaps four) 
illegitimate children, two (perhaps three) sons and one 
daughter. The dates or approximate dates of some of the 
charters in which their names occur point to the conclusion 
that these children were the offspring of a connection or con- 
nections formed previous to his marriage, which, as we have 
seen, was entered upon rather late in life. Henry of Stirling 
and Henry of Brechin occur not infrequently in the testing 
clauses of charters. And Ada, 2 daughter of Earl David and 



1 There are many notices of Earl John in Bain's Calendar, vol. i., from which 
his devotion to the chase is very apparent. 

2 This Ada must have been illegitimate, for her grant to Lindores is recorded 
in the bull of Innocent ill. (2Oth March 1198-99), while Earl David's marriage 
was not till August 1190. 



INTRODUCTION xxvii 

wife of Malise, son of Earl Ferteth and brother of Earl 
Gilbert of Stratherne, appears as granting a ploughgate of 
land to Lindores together 'with my body 1 (No. xxxvi.). 1 

A charter of Earl David (No. v.) is tested by 'duobus 
Henricis filiis comitis/ Charters of Earl John ' of Scotland ' 
(Nos. xv. xvi. xvn. xvni. xix.) are tested by 'Henrico de 
Strivelyn " or 6 Henrico de Strivelyn fratre meo. 1 The charter 
of Henry of Brechin (No. LX.) is tested by 6 Domino Henrico 
de Strivelin fratre meo/ 2 

The son David (Nos. n. in.) was perhaps illegitimate, or 
perhaps, being legitimate, died in infancy. He is not 
mentioned in Fordun. 

THE CONNECTION OF THE EARLDOM OF HUNTINGDON WITH 
THE SCOTTISH ROYAL FAMILY. 

For our purposes it is unnecessary to enter on any minute 
or elaborate investigation of the history of the earldom of 
Huntingdon in its connection with the royal family of 
Scotland. It may suffice to say that it first came to be held 
by David, afterwards David i. of Scotland, by his marriage 
with Matilda, daughter of and heir of Waltheof, Earl of 
Huntingdon, and widow of Simon de St. Liz, Earl of North- 
ampton. It was by right of his wife that David held this 
English fief. After his accession to the throne David seems 
to have transferred (doubtless with the consent of his feudal 
superior, the King of England) the earldom of Huntingdon 

1 See also Nos. ix. and xv. 

2 Henry of Stirling and Henry of Brechin, 'my brothers,' witness a charter 
of Earl John. Registrum de Aberbrothoc, i. 57. We find both Henry of 
Stirling and Henry of Brechin, ' sons of Earl David,' present at Forfar in 
October 1225. Lib, de Balmerinach, p. 5. Henry of Stirling and Henry of 
Brechin were witnesses in the nineteenth year of Alexander n. (that is the year 
ending 3rd December 1233) Ibid. pp. 18 and 31. And we find Henry of 
Stirling in 1234. Ibid. p. 61. When Henry of Stirling and Henry of Brtchin 
are mentioned together, he of Stirling is (so far as I have observed) mentioned 
first, and was presumably the elder of the two. If our inferences are well 
founded Earl David gave the name of his father to three sons, and the name of 
his mother, Ada, to two daughters. 



xxviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

to his eldest son, Prince Henry. 1 On the death of Prince 
Henry the earldom seems to have gone to his eldest son 
Malcolm. Not long after Malcolm's accession to the throne, 
whose stability was seriously affected by the internal dissen- 
sions of the kingdom, Henry n. of England seized the 
opportunity for demanding the cession to him of the counties 
of Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland. The 
offer was made that Malcolm's claim to Huntingdon would be 
admitted if he surrendered the northern counties. His 
weakness perhaps left him no alternative but to comply with 
the discreditable proposal. If we may trust Scotichronicon 
(viii. 1) Earl David held Huntingdon in the reign of his 
brother Malcolm. But it is certain that on King William 
and David joining the confederation of the supporters of the 
younger Henry in his rebellion against his father, Henry n. 
forfeited the English fiefs held by both brothers, and in 1174 
bestowed the Earldom of Huntingdon on Simon de St. Liz, 
the second of that name. It was not till 1184 or 1185 that, 
on the death of St. Liz, Henry conferred the earldom of 
Huntingdon on King William, who immediately in the 
presence of Henry (coram rege), and therefore with his con- 
sent, gave the earldom to his brother David. 2 From that 
time the earldom remained with David, and after him with 
his son John 'the Scot.' The history of the earldom after 
the death of Earl John (1237) does not concern us. He died, 
as has been said, without issue. 

EARL DAVID AND THE EARLDOM OF LENNOX. 
Our Chartulary contains (No. i.) a grant by King William 
to Earl David, conferring on him, inter alia, 'comitatum de 

1 lie did homage to Stephen for Huntingdon in 1139 (Fordun, lib. v. cap. 32, 
Skene's edit.), and is commonly designated Earl of Northumberland and 
Huntingdon. 

2 Hoveden (ii. 185) places this transaction in 1184; Benedict Abbas (i. 337) 
more precisely says it was in April 1185. Chron, de Mailros and Scotichr. 
(viii. 39) agree as to the year with Benedict. 



INTRODUCTION xxix 

Levenaus, cum omnibus pertinenciis suis.' The date of the 
charter can be approximately determined as between 1178 
and 1182. 1 The account commonly accepted, and probably 
correct, of this grant is that the earldom had fallen to the 
king in ward owing to the minority of Alwyn, second Earl of 
Lennox. 2 Lennox is not among the grants recorded in 
Scotichronicon 3 as having been made by William to David 
after the return of the former from his captivity in England. 
On the other hand, the same authority elsewhere, 4 when 
recording Earl David's death, describes him as 'Earl of 
Huntingdon, Garioch, and Lennox.' A notice of Earl 
David's administration of Lennox is to be found in the 
Register of the Monastery of Paisley, where we read that 
when he held and possessed the earldom of Lennox he sought 
to obtain an 'aid' from the lands of the church of Kilpatrick, 
'as from the other lands of the earldom, but he could not 
obtain it as these lands were defended by the Church.' 5 
The grant is quite of a piece with other indications of the 
affection that subsisted between the two brothers. Wardship 
was one of the most valuable of the feudal casualties of the 
Crown ; the dues payable in respect of it often amounted to 
very large sums, and in England wardship was commonly 
assigned at this time to the highest bidder. When Earl 
David granted to Lindores (No. n.) the tithe of 'all my 
gains which come to me of the gains of the king my brother,' 
the tithe of the profits arising from ' ward ' would, of course, 
be included. 6 



1 Hugh, Bishop of St. Andrews, one of the witnesses, was appointed to that 
see not earlier than 1178, when his predecessor died (Chron. de Mailros, s. a.). 
And Earl Waldeve, another witness, died 1182 (ibid. s. a.). 

2 Douglas, Peerage, ii. 81. 3 Lib. ix. cap. 27. 
4 Lib. ix. cap. 33. 5 Reg. Monast. Passel., pp. 166-8. 

6 Earl David's life in England affords an example of his payments to Richard I. 
for the ward of the land (in Northamptonshire) and heirs of Stephen de Cameis. 
It appears that the sum charged for this privilege was two hundred marks, and he 
seems to have only by degrees (some of the debt being still due in the reign of John) 
paid the sum owing to the Crown. From the Pipe Rolls, as summarised in 
Bain's Calendar, vol. i., Nos. 258, 264, 281. 



xxx THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

EAIIL DAVID AND THE THIIID CRUSADE 

The foundation of Lindores has been supposed by some to 
have been in fulfilment of a vow made by Earl David when 
in peril of shipwreck on his voyage to Scotland when returning 
from the Third Crusade. The historical value of the story 
upon which this supposition is based claims investigation. 
Hector Boece 1 supplies a long and circumstantial story of 
Earl David with five hundred knights having accompanied 
Richard of England on the great expedition for the relief 
of Palestine in 1190. 

Bower 2 represents Guido, first abbot of Lindores, as having 
ruled his monastery for eight and twenty years, and places 
his death on 17th June 1219, from which we gather that 
Guido was appointed in 1191, which, of course, if we accept 
it, is fatal to the story of Boece. 

But it is right to examine more minutely the account 
given by that author. David is represented as sailing with 
Richard's followers from Marseilles. The capture of Cyprus 
is then recounted ; after which David appears with Richard 
at the siege of Acre, and as commander of the troops who, 
by the aid of a friendly Scot named Oliver, in the Saracen 
garrison, succeeded in getting entrance to the city. On the 
return voyage Earl David is shipwrecked, carried captive to 
Alexandria, released by the efforts of Venetian merchants, 
carried first to Constantinople and then to Venice, where he 
is redeemed by certain Englishmen who were trading in that 
city. He makes his way to Flanders, whence he sails for 
Scotland. The ship is blown by the tempests of winter ' near 
to Norway and Shetland. 1 In his peril he vows that if he 
returns home in safety he will build a church in honour of the 
Blessed Virgin Mary. By aid of the Virgin his ship enters 
the estuary of the Tay, and comes to Alectum without rudder 



1 Scotorum Historian, lib. xiii., edit. Parisiis, 1574, pp. 275 (verso) 277. 
- Scott chr., ix. 27. 



INTRODUCTION xxxi 

or sails, not far from the rock on which there is now the 
chapel dedicated to St. Nicholas. He leaps on shore, and in 
gratitude calls the town of Alectum by a new name 
Dei-donum [Dundee], and immediately founds a church dedi- 
cated to St. Mary in the field called Triticium [? Wheatfield], 
and makes it a parish church. King William hears of the 
return of his brother, whom he had mourned as dead, and 
hurries to Dundee. His joy is almost inexpressible. He 
orders prayers to be made, and great festal rejoicing, with 
public sports. He summons a great council of the magnates 
of the realm, and therein grants permission to his brother 
to build a monastery wherever he may choose. David there- 
upon builds and richly endows an abbey in Fife, dedicated to 
St. Mary, called in the vulgar tongue Lindores. 

Such, in outline, is the story told by Boece, which, borrowed 
from him, is repeated by Holinshed and by George Buchanan, 
and has been accepted by more than one recent writer of 
repute. Are we to give it any credence, and if so, to what 
extent ? 

First of all, it must be acknowledged that such a story 
coming to us from the inaccurate and credulous Boece gains 
no presumption in favour of its truth by reason of its source. 

But, again, the Historiae Scotorum of Boece was written in 
the early part of the sixteenth century ; and there is no 
reason to suppose that the genuine sources of history on the 
matter before us, to which he had access, were other than those 
possessed by ourselves. Now the honest Fordun and his con- 
tinuator, Bower, who were never inclined to keep back any- 
thing that made for the honour of the royal family of Scotland, 
and who record several of the more noteworthy incidents in 
the lives of King William, the Lion, and his brother, David, 
are silent as to this chivalrous and romantic episode in the 
history of the latter. There is not the slightest hint that 
David had engaged in the Third Crusade. While the account 
of King Richard's expedition to Acre and his subsequent 



xxxii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

adventures are given with some fulness (lib. viii. cc. 51, 53) 
it is scarcely conceivable that if Fordun or Bower had heard 
of Earl David's expedition to Palestine it would have failed 
to find a place in Scotichronicon. Of perhaps no less weight 
in the argument is the silence of the Chronicle of' Melrose, 
which does not omit to notice King Richard's expedition. 
The names of some of the men of rank who joined in this 
Crusade are entered in the Chronicle, but the name of Earl 
David is not among them. The same silence marks the 
English chroniclers, Roger de Hoveden and Walter de Coven- 
try. The chroniclers of the events of the Third Crusade make 
no mention of the brother of the King of Scots as among the 
princes and nobles who took part in that enterprise. And 
most notable is the absence of any mention of David in 
the Itinerarium of King Richard. If ever the argument 
from silence is entitled to carry weight, here is a clear 
example. 

As it happens, none of the references to Earl David, so far 
as I know, 1 represent him as in Scotland or England between 
the date of his marriage (26th August 1190) and the beginning 
of the year 1194, so that we are not in a position to disprove 
the story by positive evidence. It is certain indeed that he 
did not accompany the English troops who had proceeded by 
ship across the Bay of Biscay; but Boece^s story represents 
him as joining the fleet at Marseilles. The facts of authentic 
history, however, reveal that Richard Coeur de Lion sailed 
from Marseilles on 7th August. 2 

In Wyntoun's Cronykill (viii. 6) we are told, with evident 
disbelief on the writer's part, that, ' as sum men sayd,' Earl 
David was the elder brother of King William. This notion, 
as we have seen, was given currency by the earlier form of 



1 In Bain's Calendar of Docitments relating to Scotland, i. Nos. 210, 214 are 
records of payments made to Earl David in the years 1190-91 and 1191-92 ; but 
it would be hazardous to assume that they were made to him in person. 
, 2 See Stubbs's Introduction (p. cxviii) to Itinerariiun Peregrinorum. 



INTRODUCTION xxxiii 

Fordun's Chronica, but was afterwards corrected. But 
Wyntoun goes on, speaking of Earl David 
' And, as men sayd, in Sarzines 
He trawalyd quhen Willame crownyd wes.' 

Assuming that ' Sarzines ' means the country of the Saracens, 
it would seem that in the early years of the fifteenth century 
the notion which Fordun in his first (and erroneous) statement 
was content to express in the form that David was 6 in parti- 
bus transmarinis ' at the time of the death of King Malcolm, 
and that therefore William was made king instead of David, 
assumed a more definite shape, but was still not generally 
accepted. But as William succeeded to the throne in 1165, 
this journey 'in Sarzines' (if it ever took place) is not to be 
confused with the Third Crusade in 1190. At a later period 
there was a story current, probably originating in a French 
romance, that a Scottish prince named David had fought in 
the Holy Land, and it appears that he was identified by some 
with David, Earl of Huntingdon. Major, in his Historia 
Majoris Britannlae (lib. iv. cap. 5), after recording the founda- 
tion of the monastery of Lindores by David, Earl of Hunting- 
don, goes on to say : * This was the David of whom mention is 
made in a book that is rather popular (satis vulgaris) among 
the French, entitled, " Of the Sons of the Three Kings, to 
wit, of France, England, and Scotland " ; and we have a book 
in our vernacular tongue not differing from it.' J 

Once more, if the founding of Lindores was in fulfilment of 
a vow made in peril at sea (though this does not seem neces- 
sarily implied by the story as told by Boece) it is strange 
that there is not the slightest allusion to the fact in the 
foundation charter (No. n.). 

1 Sir David Dalrymple (Annals, vol. i. p. 159), has doubtless correctly 
identified the French book to which Major refers. He gives the title thus : 
' S'ensuyt le livre des trois filz de Roys, c'est assavoir, de France, d'Angleterre, 
et d'Escosse, lesquels en leur jeunesse pour la foi Chretienne eurentde glorieuses 
victoires sur les Turcs, au service du Roi de Cecille, lequel fut faict apres ung 
des lecteurs de 1'empire.' A fuller account of this book will be found in 
Appendix VI. 

C 



xxxiv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDOHES 

On the whole I am disposed to regard the account not only 
as ' not proven, 1 but as wholly fictitious. It can only be said, 
that if Boece has perverted history, he has, at all events, had 
the good fortune of supplying Sir Walter Scott with a figure 
for the romantic story of The Talisman.' 1 

The munificence of Earl David towards the Scottish Church 
was not confined to the foundation of Lindores. The Register 
of the Priory of St. Andrews reveals several benefactions of his 
bestowed upon that house. He gave land in Garioch ; 2 land 
in Forgrund ; 3 the whole of the cane and conveth 4 which the 
canons of the priory owed to him from his lands at Eglesgirg ; 5 
and a toft in Dundee ; 6 and a mark from the rents of the same 
town. 7 

THE EARLY EARLS OF STRATHERN 
There is a group of charters in the Lindores Chartulary in 



1 Scott would himself have been the first to laugh, and laugh long and loud, 
if any one had pointed out that his gallant young Earl of Huntingdon was 
an elderly married man, and that his espousal with the Princess Edith was 
bigamy. With a genuine feeling for the general correctness of his historic 
colouring, Scott was very indifferent to details. 

2 Pp. 226, 239. 3 P. 237. 

4 ' Cane ' in this connection is to be understood as rent payable in kind. 
' Conveth ' was the allowance for the hospitable entertainment of the feudal 
superior when passing through his lands. 

5 P. 238. 6 Ibid. 7 P. 240. 

8 THE EARLS OF STRATHERN to A.D. 1270. 

Note. Names occurring in the Lindores Chartulary are printed in small capitals. 

(i) Malise 

(ii) FERTETH (t 1171) 



(iii) GILBERT 


MALISE 


Christian 


;. i Matilda 


2 Ysenda de 


m. ADA (natural 


m. SIR WALTER OLIFARD 


(d. of William de 


Cask 


daughter of 




Aubigny) 




Earl David) 




(t before 1223) 









Gilc'hrist William Ferteth (iv) ROBERT FERGUS MALISE GILBERT Cecilia Matilda Helen 

(t 1198) (t before 1244) (xxiv,xxvii, ('Persona' (pp.28,3i) m. Duncan in* 

(xxyiii) xxviii) de Gasch) Earl of William 

m. MURIEL (pp-31,37) Fife de 

(xxvi) Haya 



MALISE (p. 31) Lucia 

(t 1270) in. Sir Walter Sinclair 



INTRODUCTION xxxv 

which the family of the Earls of Strathern makes its appear- 
ance. Some members of the family appear as benefactors of 
the abbey, while others confirm or attest the grants. With 
a view to some approximate dating of these charters it is 
necessary to know something of the history of the early earls 
and their sons. 

The first of the Celtic chieftains of Strathern, who appears 
under the name of earl, is (i) Malise, who is found witnessing 
the foundation charter of the Priory of Scone in 1114 or 
1115, 1 and a grant made to the same monastery a few years 
later. 2 He was one of the witnesses of a charter of King 
David giving land in Partick to the Cathedral of Glasgow on 
the occasion of the dedication of the building in 1136. 3 And 
some grants to Dunfermline are witnessed by Earl Malise. 4 
In the account of the battle of the Standard (22nd August 
1138) given by Ailred, Abbot of Rievaulx, the Earl of 
Strathern is described as refusing to adopt the armour 
ordinarily worn by the Norman followers of King David. 

The successor of Malise was (ii) Earl Ferteth or Ferquhard, 
referred to as the father of Earl Gilbert and of Malise in our 
Chartulary (Nos. xxix., xxxui., xxxiv., and xxxvi.). 

In 1160 Ferteth led five other of the seven Earls of Scot- 
land (Earl Duncan of Fife, who generally heads the list of the 
seven earls, probably not being associated with them) 5 in an 
attempt to capture King Malcolm, who was then in his castle 
at Perth. The attempt was unsuccessful, and after a few 
days, on the intervention of the clergy, the king and the 
earls came to amicable terms. Fordun (viii. 4) explains this 
rising of the six earls as originating in the dread caused by 
the king's extreme devotion to English ways and to the 
English King, Henry n., with regard to whom, Fordun (with 



1 Lib. de Scon, p. 3. 

3 Reg. Glasguen., No. 3 compared with No. 7. 

4 Reg. de Dttnferm., pp. 4, 16. 

5 See the note in Skene's Fordun, vol. ii. p. 430. 



xxxvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

an ecclesiastic's reminiscence of the language of Luke xix. 14), 
represents the earls as saying within themselves, 6 Nolimms 
hunc regnare super nos. 1 

That Earl Ferteth should alone be mentioned by name 
among the six earls points, it would seem, to his having 
taken a leading part in this affair. The same national spirit 
which had shown itself in opposition to the newly intro- 
duced methods of warfare in the case of his father Earl Malise, 
seems to have asserted itself again in the conspiracy against 
a king, who had, in opposition to the wishes of many leading 
men in Scotland, a short time before attached himself to the 
army of the King of England, while it was engaged in the 
siege of Toulouse, and had received from the King of England 
the distinction of knighthood. 

According to the Chronicle of Melrose, Earl Ferteth died in 
1171. He was succeeded by (iii) Earl Gilbert, who witnessed 
or confirmed the grants made to Lindores by his brother 
Malise and by his own son Robert (Nos. xxx., xxxi., xxxn.) 
while he himself showed his interest in the Abbey by under- 
taking the military service (onus exercitus) due from the land 
of Exmagirdle in the parish of Dron, some few miles from the 
Abbey, which had been assigned to the monks. It was not 
Earl Gilbert but his brother Malise who was the chief bene- 
factor of Lindores at this period. Earl Gilbert, who was 
munificent in his ecclesiastical benefactions, was founder of 
Inchaffray and did much for the cathedral of Dunblane, 1 and 
probably his resources were taxed to the uttermost in support 
of these establishments. The special interest of Malise in 
Lindores can be easily accounted for when we remember that 
he had married Ada, daughter of Earl David, the founder of 
the Abbey. Ada herself, ' daughter of Earl David, and wife 
of Malise, son of Earl Ferteth,' granted a ploughgate of land to 
the Abbey, and expressed the wish that in the Abbey her 



1 See the account, probably much exaggerated, given by Fordun (viii. 73). 



INTRODUCTION xxxvii 

body should find sepulture (No. xxxvi.). And Malise makes 
the grant to the Abbey of the lands of Rathengothen for the 
souls of his ancestors, 'and for the soul of Ada, my wife, 
daughter of Earl David ' (No. xxix.). 

Earl Gilbert had married Matildis, daughter of William 
de Aubegni, and by her had a numerous family. Our own 
Chartulary has references to his sons, Robert, afterwards earl 
(No. xxxi.), and as earl (Nos. xxv., xxvn., etc.); Fergus, a 
considerable benefactor of Lindores (Nos. xxin., xxiv., xxvi., 
xxvin., xxxii.); Gilbert (among the witnesses of No. xxvni.) ; 
and Malise, ' parson of Gask ' (among the witnesses of Nos. 
xxvii. and LIII. ; and see xxvin.). From other sources we 
know that Earl Gilbert's eldest son Gilchrist had died in his 
father's lifetime, and was buried in Inchaffray ; l and there are 
notices of two other sons, William and Ferteth. 2 Mr. Cosmo 
Innes in his Preface to the Registrum de Inchaffray accepts for 
the date of the death of Earl Gilbert the year 1223, on the 
authority of a chronicle 'which seems to have been written 
in the diocese, or to be in some other way peculiarly connected 
with Dunblane. 1 3 

Gilbert was succeeded by (iv) Earl Robert, who appears, as 
has been observed, several times in our Chartulary. His son 
Malise, who afterwards succeeded, appears in our Chartulary 
during the life of his father as a witness to a charter (No. 
xxvii.). He must have succeeded as (v) Earl of Strathern 
before 1244; in which year he appears as one of the guarantors 
of the treaty between Alexander n. and Henry in. of Eng- 



1 The principal charter of Inchaffray is dated in the year 1200, 'ab obitu 
prenominati filii nostri Gilcrist anno secundo.' Registrum de Inchaffray, p. 5. 

2 Among the witnesses of the principal charter of Inchaffray, we find 
' Willelmus, Ferthead, Robertus, filii comitis.' The order in which the names 
appear is presumably that of seniority ; and as Robert succeeded his father in 
the earldom, it may be assumed that William and Ferteth had, like Gilchrist, 
died before their father. Ibid. 

3 'Gilbertusfundator canonicorum Insule Missarum et episcopatus Dunblanensis 
obiit Anno Domini 1223.' Extracta e cronicis Scotie, p. 92. 



xxxviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

land. 1 He died, according to Bower, in France, in the year 
1270. 2 This slight sketch of the family of the early Earls 
of Strathern is sufficiently full for our special purpose, and 
will be helpful in determining more or less nearly the dates of 
the charters. 3 

The relation of the Earls of Strathern to the bishopric 
of Dunblane was peculiar. Whatever measure of truth there 
be in the story told by Bower 4 that Earl Gilbert divided his 
earldom into three parts, one part being given to the bishop 
and church of Dunblane, one part to Inchaffray, which he had 
founded, and the third being reserved for himself and his 
heirs, his relation and that of his successors to the church was 
one of great and peculiar influence. They are styled the 
' patrons' of the church, 5 and, what is much more remarkable, 
the Pope when appointing, or confirming an appointment, to 
the bishopric, intimated the fact (as in other cases to the 
king) to the Earl of Strathern. Thus Pope Martin iv. when 
appointing Bishop William in 1284 sends concurrent letters 
to the chapter, to the clergy and people, and to Malise, Earl 
of Strathern, ' patron of the church of Dunblane.' 6 We find 
the same course followed in the case of the papal confirmation 
of the election of Alpin (1296) ; 7 and again in the confirma- 
tion of Nicholas de Balmy le, 8 and again in 134<7. 9 In 1361 an 
appointment is reported by the Pope to the earl and to 
the king. 10 

EARL DAVID'S ORIGINAL ENDOWMENT OF LINDORES 

From the various lands held by Earl David in Scotland, the 
names of which are recorded in the charter of King William's 



1 See Foedera, i. 257. 

2 Scotichron., lib. x. cap. 29. 

3 These dates will be considered in the Notes and Illustrations at the end of 
the volume. 

4 Scotichron.) lib. viii. cap. 723. 5 See p. 57. 

6 Theiner's Monumenta, No. 284. 7 Ibid. No. 355, 

8 Ibid. No. 386. 9 Ibid. No. 576. 10 Ibid. No. 644. 



INTRODUCTION xxxix 

grant to his brother (No. i.), he selected Lindores as the site 
of his monastery. The lands lie on the southern banks of 
the Tay, and the Abbey is beautifully situated about five 
hundred yards from the river and half a mile eastwards from 
the little town of Newburgh, the 'nostrum burgum' and 
' novum burgum ' of our Chartulary. The extent of land 
here granted was considerable. Its marches are not fully 
indicated in the Chartulary ; l but from notices of the leasing 
of various holdings and from the ' Rentaill of the Abbey of 
Lundoris,' now preserved in the charter-chest of Mugdrum, 
and assigned to the close of the fifteenth century, Mr. Alex- 
ander Laing, who on questions of the topography of Lindores 
and its neighbourhood is entitled to speak with high 
authority, describes the property as ' a stretch of about four 
miles in length and upwards of two miles in breadth, of fine 
upland pasture, and of rich and diversified arable soil.'' 2 
These lands included the land of the church of Lindores, 
which church was at the same time made over to the 
monastery. 

The foundation charter also grants the whole island called 
6 Redinche,' which one cannot doubt has been correctly identi- 
fied as the large island in the Tay facing the monastery and 
now known as Mugdrum island. Tall reeds grow in great 
abundance on the shores of the island ; and Mr. Laing's con- 
jecture that the word Redinche is a form of ' Reedinch ' will 
perhaps commend itself to those who view the island from the 
ruins of the Abbey. 3 The island and the fishings round the 
island were granted to the monastery with the reservation 

1 Lindores Loch the magnus lacus of Charter n., now skirted by the railway 
from Ladybank to Perth, is more than three-quarters of a mile in length, and 
more than a quarter of a mile broad in its widest part. The stream (rivulus) 
from the lake to the Tay which formed the eastern boundary of Earl David's 
grant falls into the river near the abbey. But see Notes on CXL. 

2 Lindores Abbey and its Biirgh of Newburgh , p. 68. In the taxatio of the 
lands of monasteries in the diocese of St. Andrews the lands of Lindores are 
rated at xvi. lib. et xvi. den. Reg. Prior. S. Andr., p. 39. 

3 But see Mr. Gibb's note on No. LXXXVI. 



xl THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

(1) of the earl's 'yare,' a word signifying an enclosure of 
stake-nets in which fish were caught as the tide ebbed ; and 

(2) his right of pasturing his cattle on the island. But 
apparently this right of pasture was not to be to the exclusion 
of the cattle of the monastery, for in the Bull of Celestine in. 
(No. xcni.) it is stated that the 'easements' of the island 
were to be common to the earl and the monks. 

The other lands granted to the monastery at its founda- 
tion were the lands of Fintray (in Aberdeenshire) ; and ' in 
Garioch, Lethgauel, and Malind'; and in Perth all Earl 
David's land that was called Inch (insula) ; l and a ploughgate 
of land in Newtyle granted by Earl David's natural daughter, 
Ada, wife of Malise, son of Ferteth, Earl of Strathern. 2 

Earl David also granted to the monastery three tofts, one 
in Perth, one ' in my burgh of Dundee,' and one ' in my burgh 
of Inverury.' 

Some time after the foundation Earl David added the gift 
of certain lands on the coast of Kincardineshire close to its 
southern boundary. 3 They lie within, or close to, the parish 
of St. Cyrus (Eglesgirg) ; and they appeared to have remained 
in possession of Lindores down to the dissolution of the 
monastery. 4 

Earl David's grants of parish churches with their church- 
lands and tithes were numerous ; indeed, as he states, all the 
churches in Scotland which were in his gift he made over to 
the Abbey. 5 These were the churches of (1) Lindores (already 
referred to), which is almost certainlv to be identified with the 



1 In 1236 the monastery surrendered Inch to Alexander II. in exchange for 
other land, see No. xxn. 

2 Compare No. II. with No. xxxvi. One is led to suppose that these were not 
two gifts of Ada (though that is just possible), but that the * vill of Balemagh ' 
was only some more specific designation of the part of Newtyle where the land 
was situated. 

3 No. vin. This charter must be placed after March 1198, for the grants 
are not mentioned in the bull of Innocent in. 

4 See the Rental (of about 1580), printed by Mr. Laing, Lindores Abbey, 
p. 424- 5 See No. iv. 



INTRODUCTION .xli 

old parish church of Abdie, 1 the ruins of which lie close to the 
north-west corner of the Loch of Lindores, about two miles 
from the abbey; (2) the church of Dundee, 2 followed by the 
churches in Aberdeenshire, namely, (3) the church of Fintray ; 

(4) the church of Inverury, with its chapel of Monkegie ; 3 

(5) the church of Durnach (Logie-Durno) ; (6) the church of 
Prameth (Premnay) ; (7) the church of Rathmuliel, or Rath- 
m uriel; 4 (8) the church of Inchmabanin (Insch); (9) the 
church of Culsamuel (Culsalmond) ; and (10) the church of 
Kilalcmond (Kinnethmont). All these, with their chapels, 
lands, and tithes, were made over to the monastery 'ad 
proprios usus et sustentaciones eorundem monachorum.' The 
significance of this phrase will be dealt with by and by. 5 

In addition to lands and churches, Earl David made an 
important augmentation to the revenues of the monastery by 
grants of another kind. First, casualties of various sorts 
would accrue to him from time to time as feudal superior and 
lord of Garioch, wards, 'aids,' fines on subinfeudation, and 
such like ; of these a tithe was granted to Lindores. Secondly, 
he granted to Lindores a tithe of his ' pleas,' that is, a tithe 
of the fines, escheats, and other issues of his baron's court. 



1 The ' Ebedyn ' of No. LXII. 

2 Mr. A. Laing states that the first mention of the town of Dundee in authentic 
record is to be found in the foundation charter 'certainly executed before A.D. 
1198' (Lindores Abbey ', etc., p. 55). The bull of Celestine in. (No. xciii.) 
enables us to point to the mention of Dundee early in 1195. 

3 In the bull of Celestine ill. the language used is ' the church of Rothket, 
with its chapels, namely, Inverury and Monkegie,' and this is repeated in the 
bull of Innocent in. In King William's charter (No. cxxxvni.) there is no 
mention of Rothket ; and we have ' the church of Inverury with the chapel 
of Monkegie.' Monkegie does not appear as a separate parish in the thir- 
teenth century. In 1481 'the paroche Kyrk of Monkege ' is mentioned. See 
Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, vol. i. p. 569. 

4 There is now no parish corresponding to Rathmuriel. Its situation can be 
inferred approximately from Charter LV. The form of the word is Rothmuriell 
in the valuation of churches in the thirteenth century printed in Registrum 
Aberdonense, ii. p. 54. In fietours for 1626 (No. 178) we find ' Christiskirk de 
Rothmurielle. ' The ruins of Christ's Kirk are in the parish of Kinnethmont. 

5 It may be observed that the parish of Durnach is Logindurnach (Logy- 
durnach) as early as 1251. See No. LXXX. 



xlii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Thirdly, he granted a tithe of the gains which came to him 
of the gains of his brother the king. An example of such 
is afforded in the gains accruing from the wardship of 
the Lennox already referred to. 1 Fourthly, he granted a 
tithe of all things capable of tithe on his manors beyond 
the Mounth, ' of grain and meal, of butter and cheese, of 
flesh and venison, of food and drink, of the skins of animals 
caught in hunting, of wax and salt, of fat and tallow,' etc. 

All the grants of Earl David, like the great majority of the 
grants made in early times to the Church in Scotland, were 
'in free, pure, and perpetual alms, 1 and nothing was to be 
asked in return ' save only prayers for the weal of the soul/ 
The monks were to be free of all secular services such as lay 
vassals were required to render to their lord, and were ex- 
pressly exempt from the vexatious demand of ' aids ' (auxilia)? 
We have already seen an instance of Earl David, as holding 
the Earldom of Lennox, attempting to obtain an ' aid ' from 
churchlands of Kilpatrick. 3 

Lastly, the foundation charter confers on the monastery 
their 'court free in all respects, and the dignity of peace. * 
The word ' dignitas ' in this connection is probably to be 
understood in the sense (familiar to students of mediaeval 
Latin) of ' privilege, 1 and perhaps refers to the Abbey having 
the earl's protection. Its equivalent in the bull of Celestine 
in. is ' firmam pacem ' (No. xcin.). As ' dignitas pacis ' is 
confirmed by King William (No. cxxxvm.), the Abbey was 
secured of royal protection. In another charter (No. v.), the 
earl grants the abbot and convent a court of jurisdiction over 
'their men' living in the churchlands of Culsalmond and 
Monkegie in the north. 

1 P. xxix. 

2 In England these, as demanded by the king, were felt to be so burdensome 
and numerous that at length the Great Charter of Liberties, wrested by the 
barons from King John, strictly limited their number. See Magna Charta> 12, 
' Nullum scutagium vel auxilium,' etc. 

3 See p. xxix. 



INTRODUCTION xliii 

Such are the grants made in the foundation charter. Other 
benefactions, though not very many or extensive, were made 
by others, which will be noticed hereafter. But this seems a 
suitable place for considering more particularly the character 
and the value of the grant of the ten parish churches Lindores, 
Dundee, and the eight churches in the lordship of Garioch. 
What is said of these may be applied mutatis mutandis to other 
churches granted to the monks in proprios usus. 

Immediately on the first notices we possess of the estab- 
lishment of parish churches in Scotland, we meet with the 
beginnings of the practice of patrons conferring them upon 
monasteries. Such a transfer, when not merely a grant of the 
advowson (that is, merely of the right of presenting a priest 
to the bishop for institution to the church with its cure of 
souls), was intended to convey the whole revenues of the 
church from lands, tithes, oblations, and dues to the 
monastery. This could only be effected with the sanction 
of the bishop in whose diocese the church was situated ; and 
it was his duty (if he sanctioned the transfer) to secure that a 
decent maintenance should be allowed by the monastery to 
the priest who was to have cure of souls in the parish. This 
priest was instituted by the bishop, and when once appointed 
was irremovable except by legal process in the ecclesiastical 
courts. He was the 'perpetual vicar," or, more briefly, the 
'vicar' of the parish, the monastery obtaining all the rights 
of ' rector. ' The monastery had the right to present the 
vicar, who received for his maintenance such an allowance as 
was agreed on between the parties, with the concurrence and 
assent of the bishop. 

As can be easily understood, it was a temptation to the 
abbot and chapter to appoint a cheap man, one who would 
take as little as possible in remuneration for his services; and 
thus leave as much as possible to be added to the income of the 
monastery. The bishop appears constantly as endeavouring 
to secure good terms for the vicars of such churches. And 



xliv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

such efforts on his part contributed not a little to the strained 
relations, or open antagonism, that we find frequently sub- 
sisting between the bishops and the monasteries. 

The growing evil of the aggrandisement of the monasteries 
at the cost of the parochial clergy soon made itself felt in 
various parts of Western Christendom, and we find in- 
junctions by the Popes issued with a view to restrain or 
mitigate the injury. Not long before the foundation of 
Lindores we find Pope Alexander in. writing to the Arch- 
bishop of York that he should refuse the presentation made 
by monasteries to parish churches unless in his presence an 
income was assigned to the presentee which would afford him 
a fitting maintenance (congruam sustentacionem\ and enable 
him to pay his dues to the bishop. 1 Some ten years later the 
same Pope rebuked the monasteries of the diocese of York for 
their ' covetousness which is idolatry ,' as manifested by their 
cutting down the incomes of the parish clergy serving the 
churches which had been appropriated to them. 2 The Scottish 
Church was painfully sensible of the evil. In the body of 
Statutes enacted in Scotland in the thirteenth century, we 
find a canon on the subject enjoining that the vicars of churches 
should have a sufficient and decent maintenance (sufficientem et 
honestam sustentacionem) from the revenues of the churches 
whose altars they served. It fixes the minimum income for 
a vicar at ten marks (6 lib. 13s. 4d.), after meeting all the 
' ordinary burdens,' such as procurations and other dues of 
the bishop, and adds that in the case of rich churches (in 
pinguioribus ecclesiis) there should be a suitable increase of the 
amount. 3 But the struggle between the vicars (supported by 
the bishops) and the monasteries continued to manifest itself 
from time to time. In the case of some of the Lindores 
churches we find, about the middle of the thirteenth century, 

1 The substance of this injunction was afterwards embodied in the Decretals 
of Gregory IX. (lib. iii. tit. v. cap. 12), and became part of the Canon Law of the 
Church. 2 Decretal, lib. iii. tit. v. cap. 10. 

3 Stattita Ecclesiae Scoticanae, ii. 1 2. 



INTRODUCTION xlv 

certain of the vicars of three of the churches in the diocese 
of Aberdeen, which we seem justified in identifying with 
Culsalmond, Rathmuriel, and Kinnethmont (Kilalcmond), 
claiming an augmentation to their incomes, and proceeding 
to litigation on the subject (No. xcn.). The question was 
appealed to the Apostolic See, and the Pope, according to a 
sensible practice, common at this time, referred the matter to 
certain Scottish ecclesiastics delegated by him to examine into 
the dispute and pronounce judgment. One of the vicars, the 
vicar of Kinnethmont, had taken the law into his own hands, 
and for three years had refused the payment to the monastery, 
out of his tithe, of thirty lambs of good quality (pacabiles) 
which he was bound to render. The papal delegates were, as 
usual, chosen from among persons who might be presumed to 
have no personal interest in the disputed question. They 
were the chancellor of Moray, and the treasurer, and a canon 
of Dunkeld. 

In the bull appointing the delegates (No. cv.) we find 
brought out clearly the action of the Bishop of Aberdeen 
in the matter. He had learned that Lindores and other 
monasteries had been demanding increased payments from 
their ' appropriate ' churches, and he had forbidden the vicars, 
on pain of suspension, to pay anything in addition to the old 
pensions, that is, the annual payment fixed at the granting 
of these churches to the monks dd proprios usus. It was a 
test question of great importance. Not only Lindores, but 
also three other, much more important, religious houses were 
affected. The priory of St. Andrews and the abbeys of Kelso 
and Arbroath had their ' appropriate' churches in the diocese ; 
and the three monasteries (a formidable combination) united 
their forces with Lindores to bring the question to an issue. 1 
The curious will not find it difficult to understand the con- 
tentions of the parties if they read the bulls (Nos. cv. and 



See Reg. Aberdon., i. pp. 18-26. 



xlvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

cvi.) and the adjudication pronounced five years later by 
the delegates, but not finally confirmed by the Pope for two 
more years. 1 Appeals to Rome were tedious as well as costly. 

Differences between the monastery and the vicars of their 
'appropriate' churches were not confined to the diocese of 
Aberdeen. About the same time trouble of a like kind arose 
as to the proper valuation of the vicarage of St. Mary's 
Dundee. The abbot and convent of Lindores had presented 
one William Mydford to the vicarage, and the bishop of the 
diocese (Brechin) had admitted the presentee with the reserva- 
tion that the bishop should have the right of determining the 
proportions of the revenues of the church which should be 
assigned to the monastery and the vicar respectively. The 
bishop had a formal hearing in the spring of 1252, the parties 
being present; the revenues of the church were carefully con- 
sidered, and the bishop, de consilio proborum virorum, pro- 
nounced his decision that the vicar should have the whole 
altarage, and out of it should pay annually a ' pension ' of 
ten marks sterling 2 to the monastery. Mydford appealed to 
Rome against this decision, and refused, despite the frequent 
admonitions of the bishop, to pay the assigned pension. 
Somewhat complicated litigation continued to drag its slow 
course for more than four years. Finally the vicar submitted, 
and agreed to pay his ten marks and all arrears, together with 
interest and law expenses, which were taken as amounting to 
fifty marks, though it was admitted that they really amounted 
to a larger sum. 3 

There is preserved in the Register of the Diocese of Aber- 
deen a valuation of the parishes of the diocese, which has 

1 See legist. Aberdon., i. pp. 19-26. 

2 After more than two hundred years it was this sum vi lib. xiii s. and iv d. 
which continued to come to Lindores from 'the wiccarag of Dundy.' See 
Rental in Laing's Lindores Abbey, p. 413. 

3 The course of the legal proceedings in this case is worthy of study, and 
may be followed in the pages of Liber S. Marie de Lundoris by reading con- 
secutively Nos. 7, ii, and 13. A good and full summary of the proceedings will 
be found in Mr. A. Maxwell's Old Dundee. 



INTRODUCTION 



xlvii 






been assigned by Mr. Cosmo Innes to 'about 1275.' J It is 
of much value to us as enabling us to gain a tolerably correct 
notion of the revenues of the churches in the Garioch which 
were ' appropriate ' of the abbey of Lindores, and of the pro- 
portion of such revenues which went respectively to the abbey 
and to the vicars. Whether the valuation should be assigned 
to ' about 1275 ' I shall not discuss ; but it is certain that it 
was before Boiamund's valuation, of which some account will 
be given later on. If conjecture is permissible it may be 
supposed that it was a valuation which it was hoped that 
Boiamund would accept ; but, as will be seen, he was required 
by his commission from the Pope to take a valuation on oath, 
and the real revenues (verus valor) so ascertained were con- 
siderably larger than represented in the old valuation. For 
the convenience of the reader, and the purpose of comparison 
with Boiamund's valuation, in which pounds, shillings, and 
pence is a frequent denomination, the marks of this valuation 
have been reduced to the more familiar form. 

Extracting from this Register the churches of Lindores, 
we have the following results. The word 'Rector 1 is to be 
understood as the community of Lindores, which enjoyed the 
rectoral rights. 



Fintray, . . Vicar, 61ib. 13s. 4d. 

Inverury, . Vicar, lllib. 7s. 8d. 

Premnay, . Vicar, 2Kb. 13s. 4d. 

Rathmuriel, . Vicar, 2lib. 

Insch, . . Vicar, 4lib. 

Culsalmond, . Vicar, 4Kb. 

Kinnethmund, Vicar, 4lib. 

Durnach, . Vicar, 13lib. 6s. 8d. 



Rector, llib. 13s. 4d. and 20 
chalders of meal. 

Rector, 6lib. 10s. and 24 

chalders of meal. 

Rector, lOlib. 13s. 8d. 

Rector, 61ib. 6s. 8d. 

Rector, 141ib. 13s. 4d. 

Rector, I71ib. 13s. 4d. 

Rector, 

Rector, 



71ib. 6s. 8d. and 30 
chalders of meal. 
Leslie, 2 . . Vicar, 31ib. 6s. 8d. Rector, lOlib. 



1 Registr. Aberdon., ii. pp. 51-54. 

2 Leslie (though not of Earl David's gift) is included, as it was granted to 
Lindores shortly after the foundation. See pp. 88-90. 



xlviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

It is perhaps now impossible to determine with precise accuracy 
the value of a chalder of meal in the third quarter of the 
thirteenth century; 1 but from those cases where simply a 
money value is given to the vicar's and the rector's portion it 
can readily be seen to what a large extent the parish revenues of 
the Garioch churches were diverted to the abbey of Lindores. 
Even allowing for the great purchasing value of money in 
those days it is plain that some of the vicars were but 
poorly paid. 

In 1275 the new valuation of the ecclesiastical property of 
Scotland, demanded by the Pope with a view to exacting a 
tithe for the relief of the Holy Land, again furnishes us 
with material for estimating the increases to the vicars of the 
appropriate churches and comparing them with the revenue 
received by the monastery. Boiamund, or, as he was called 
in Scotland, Bagimont, was sent from Rome to Scotland to 
make the valuation and collect the tithe. This proceeding 
was excessively distasteful to the clergy. A valuation which 
had served for many years was beyond question far too low, 
and Boiamund was empowered to compel the clergy to give 
their oaths to the accuracy of the returns they made. This 
he did ; and ' Bagimont's Rolls ' (imperfect though they are) 
form a most valuable record. In making my calculations I 
have followed the Roll as given from the copy preserved at 
Rome and published (1864) in Theiner's Vetera Monumental 
While the record is deficient in many particulars, fortunately 
the return for the deanery of Garioch (in which all the 
northern churches of Lindores were situated) is complete; and 
the accounts are rendered for two years. The denomination 
in which the accounts are given varies; it is sometimes in 

1 As oats were much more largely cultivated than other kinds of grain, we 
may assume that the farina of the record above was oatmeal. The usual price 
for a chalder of oats was a mark, though it sometimes was as much as a pound 
(Exchequer Rolls, I. pp. liii. liv.). Taking the lower figure, we get the value of 
the meal from Fintray as I3lib. 6s. 8d. ; from Inverury as i61ib.; and from 
Durnach as 2Olib. a Pp. 109-116. 



INTRODUCTION xlix 

marks, sometimes in pounds, shillings, and pence. I have 
reduced all the figures to the more familiar denomination. 
What is entered is the tithe of the true value as actually paid 
to Boiamund or his agents. 

The tithe of the verus valor of the vicarages of the 
churches in the deanery of Garioch which belonged to the 
Abbey of Lindores, extracted from the accounts of Boiamund 
as printed in Theiner's Vetera Monumenta Hibernorum et 
Scotorum Historiam illustrantia, pp. 110-11 and p. 115 : 

For the year ending For the year ending 
24th June 1275. 24th June 1276. 



Fintray, . 17 4 174 

Inverury, . . .140 140 

Premnay, . . 10 10 

Rathmuriel, . .068 068 

Insch, . . 17 4 17 3 

Culsalmond, . 10 10 

Kinnethmund, . 13 4 13 4 

Durnach, . . .168 1 10 

Leslie, . . 10 10 

It is to be regretted that we have not a larger number of 
years from which to construct an average. A good year or 
a bad year for the farmers meant a good year or a bad year 
for the Church. But taking the average on the two years we 
find the vicar's income to be as follows : 

lib. s. d. 

Fintray, . . . . 11 3 4 

Jnverury, . . . . 12 

Premnay, . . . . .500 

Rathmuriel, . . . . .368 

Insch, . 8 12 11 

Culsalmond, . . . . .500 

Kinnethmund, . . . . 6 13 4 

Durnach, . . . . 14 3 4 

Leslie, . . ... . 500 

Total, . 70 19 7 

Now we also have recorded in Boiamund's accounts the tithe 
paid each year by the abbot of Lindores for his ecclesiastical 

d 



1 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

income from the deanery of Garioch. This for the first year 
of BoiamuncTs taxation was 331ib. 3s. 8d., and for the second 
231ib. 3s. 8d. ; giving us the average of 281ib. 3s. 8d., repre- 
senting an income of 2811ib. 16s. Sd. This, perhaps, included 
the revenue from the lands in Garioch as well as the churches, 
so that we are still uncertain as to the proportion of revenue 
at this date which came from the churches of the Garioch to 
Lindores ; but the earlier record in the Register of Aberdeen 
makes plain that the proportion was large. 

In the case of the parish of Dundee, Gregory, Bishop of 
Brechin (circa 14) granted the whole revenues of the church 
to Lindores, but required that lOlib. sterling should be paid 
yearly to the vicar. 1 

To the benefactions of Earl David recorded in the founda- 
tion charter he soon added other grants. The monks were 
allowed (No. vn.) to take as much stone as they needed for 
the building of the church and conventual buildings from 
the earl's neighbouring quarry in Hyrneside. 2 

From his English possessions Earl David granted two 
churches Wissendene (Whissendine) in the north-west of 
Rutlandshire, and Cunington (Conington) in the north of 
Huntingdonshire, botli churches being then in the vast diocese 
of Lincoln. 3 

In or adjoining the latter parish was the abbey of Sautry 
in which the body of Earl David found its resting-place. 

At the period of the foundation of Lindores, when so many 



1 Lib. S. Marie de Lundoris, p. 17. 

2 This is the Irnsyde or Earnside of later documents. For a discussion on the 
derivation of the word which it is contended is not to be connected with the 
name of the river Earn see Laing's Lindores Abbey, p. 87 note. I am dis- 
posed to think that Charter vu. may be earlier than the foundation charter. 
See the charter printed in Appendix I. 

3 Whissendine is now in the diocese of Peterborough, and Conington in that 
of Ely. An error of transcription in the Confirmation of Innocent III., as 
printed from Baluze, in Ttirnbull's Liber S. Marie de Lindoris (pp. 39-40), 
gave the name of the latter church as ' Cuningroue ' ; and this led Mr. Laing 
(Lindores Abbey, p. 54) into fruitless speculations as to its identification. 



INTRODUCTION li 

of the barons of Scotland held fiefs in England, it was not 
uncommon to confer land and churches in England on 
Scottish monasteries, and Scottish land and churches on 
monasteries in England. A notable example of the latter was 
the grant of the church of Annan and five other parishes 
in the south-west of Scotland by an early Robert de Brus 
(who held the lordship of Guisborough in the north-riding of 
Yorkshire) to the abbot and canons of Guisborough. 1 The 
great Benedictine Abbey of Reading not only drew a ' pension 
from the Isle of May, but was entitled by a grant of David i. 
to the surplus of the revenues of the vill of Rindalgros, at the 
junction of the Earn and the Tay a few miles west of 
Lindores. 2 

The abbey of Jedburgh had the churches of Abbotsleigh, 
in Hunts, and Bassenthwaite and Kirkanders in Cumberland. 3 
The priory of canons regular of St. Andrews obtained by the 
gift of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster, 'the churches of Carling- 
ford and Ruskache, and the churches of all Caling,** in Ireland, 
which were confirmed to the priory by Henry in. in 1237. 4 

It was often more convenient to take a fixed 'pension 1 
from a parish church in places remote from a monastery than 
to undertake dealing with the collection and disposal of 
tithes. 5 At any rate it was so in the case of Whissendine, 
where the arrangement sanctioned by the Bishop of Lincoln 
was that Lindores should have the patronage of the church 
and an annual pension of ten marks (No. en.). In 1248 the 
incumbent of that parish was Master Rolandin, a chaplain 
of the Pope. Out of ' reverence ' to the Apostolic See the 

1 See Reg. Glasguen., ii. 620 and i. 105. 

2 See Records of the Priory of the Isle of May, p. i. 

3 Originally the two latter churches were in the province of Cumbria when 
subject to the Scottish crown. 

4 Bain's Calendar, vol. i. No. 1363. The charter of De Lacy and King 
Henry's confirmation will be found in Reg. Prior. S. Andr,, pp. 118, 119. 

5 We find, however, in the case of Guisborough that the monks had in each 
of their Scottish parishes an acre for the collection of their tithe-sheaves and a 
threshing-floor in a suitable situation. 



lii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

monastery did not in his case require the payment of the 
pension ; but it was thought well to obtain from the Pope a 
bull (No. en.) to the effect that this act of remission on their 
part was not to create a prejudice against the rights of the 
monastery in the future. 1 

The right of advowson to the church of Whissendine is 
distinctly acknowledged in the bull to belong to Lindores ; 
but at an earlier date (1213) that right was disputed in an 
imparlance before King John by Elena de Moreville and her 
son Alan de Galweia on the one part and the abbot of 
Lindores on the other. 2 The patronage was in Lindores in the 
reign of Edward i. ; but it is said that during the wars of 
independence it was alienated to the prior and convent of 
Sempringham in Lincolnshire. 3 We certainly find nothing as 
to either of the English churches in the records of the 
monastery after that date. 4 

This is not an inappropriate place to observe that, when a 
parish church made over to monks in proprios usus was situated 
in the neighbourhood of the monastery, it was not unusual to 
serve the church by one of the monks and so avoid the ap- 
pointment of a vicar. This would seem to have been the 
arrangement in the case of the parish of Abdie, in which the 
monastery of Lindores was placed, for we find mention, not of 



1 In this bull Master Rolandin is styled ' rector ' of Whissendine ; and other 
instances could be cited where the instituted priests of monastic churches are so 
called. See what is said in the legal opinion (p. 214) : those having care of 
souls, ' qui ad modum patrie dicuntur vicarii, set pocius veri rectores sunt ? ' 
Could this Master Rolandin be the Master Holland, Primicerius of Sienna, to 
whom on the petition of Pandulph, Bishop of Norwich, a dispensation to hold 
benefices and serve them by vicars was granted in 1226 ? See Calendar of Papal 
Registers, vol. i. p. in. 

2 Bain's Calendar, vol. 5. No. 594. 

3 See Laing's Lindores Abbey, p. 54. 

4 The latest notice I have found of Whissendine as connected with Lindores 
is a litigation concerning the church between the abbot and Devorgulla de 
Balliol in 1289 (Bain's Calendar, ii. No. 380). A Scotsman, Adam de Kyrkud- 
bright, was parson of the other English church of the abbey, Conington, in 
1282 (ibid. No. 222). 



INTRODUCTION liii 

a vicar, but of a * chaplain, 1 ministering in the parish church. 1 
In this way the whole of the xxxiv. marks (22 lib. 13s. 4d.) at 
which the church at Lindores (or Abdie) was rated would go 
to the monastery. 2 

In the interval between the bull of Celestine in. and that 
of Innocent in. 3 the church of Muthill in the bishopric of 
Strathern, that is, of Dunblane, was granted to Lindores; 
and as we learn elsewhere in our Chartulary (Nos. cxxvu. and 
XLI.) the donor was Malise, brother of Gilbert, earl of 
Strathern. Malise, it will be remembered, was married to 
Ada, (illegitimate) daughter of the founder of the abbey, who 
herself had made a grant of land to the monastery, and 
bequeathed her body for burial in that place. 

Interests of a material kind, affecting various persons, were 
involved in this grant. Muthill was a ' mensal ' church of the 
Bishop of Dunblane ; that is, it was a church the revenues of 
which, after making suitable provision for the cure of souls in 
the parish, went to the bishop's ' table,' or, in other words, to 
the episcopal income. On the subject of the grant litigation 
arose between the bishop and Guido, first abbot of the 
monastery. The question in dispute was appealed to Rome ; 
and Innocent in. commissioned as judges-delegate the prior 
of St. Andrews, the prior of May, and the archdeacon of 
St. Andrews to try and determine the cause. The nature of 
the proceedings, the judgment, and the amendment of the 
judgment will be found in detail in Charters XLII.-L. 

; 



SOME EARLY NOTICES OF SCHOOLS 

Any notices of the efforts of the Church at an early date 
on behalf of the cause of education are of peculiar 
interest. We find that there was a school at Dunblane, 
which had been accustomed to receive ' conveth, 1 which is pro- 



1 No. LXIII. 

2 See Reg. Prior. S. Andr., p. 34. 

3 Dated respectively 8th March 1195 and 20th March 1199. 



liv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

bably to be understood as an allowance in the form of food, 
in the vill of Eglismagril. Its head, who styles himself ' Rex 
scolarum de Dumblayn,' 1 together with the scholars (scolastici) 
quitclaim their ' conveth ' for two shillings to be paid yearly 
at Whitsunday (No. XLVI.). At Muthill there was another 
school with its ' rex ' and its scholars who quitclaimed their 
4 conveth ' for a like amount (No. XLVII.). One is less con- 
fident that the clerks (clerici) of Methven, who are mentioned 
in the next charter as also relinquishing ' conveth ' on the 
same terms, were students of some establishment for education ; 
but it is not improbable that it was so, for the word clerwus 
is not infrequently used in this sense. The name Macbeth 
borne by the ' rex ' of the schools at Dunblane, and the name 
Malduueny, which belonged to the ' rex ' of the schools of 
Muthill, suggest that these schools were a survival of the 
ancient Celtic Christianity of that part of the country. 

We also learn (No. xxxn.) that the chapter of Dunkeld had 
been accustomed to receive ' conveth ' and rent out of the 
lands of a place called Rathengothen ' ad opus Macleins et 
Scoloccorum."* Here the ' scoloc 1 or ' scolog" of Celtic records 
is very apparent. And it has been suggested that the word 
' Macleins " is here not a proper name but the Gaelic equivalent 
of scholars. 1 Dr. Dickson in the notice of the Chartulary of 
Lindores which was within a few days of its discovery com- 
municated to the Society of Scottish Antiquaries 2 writes : 
' In the early Celtic Church of Scotland as of Ireland, the 
lector or teacher was known as " ferleighinn," while the scholar 
or student was " macleighinn " (pronounced maclane) films 
lectionis, and in a subordinate degree of proficiency " scoloc," 
scholasticus? 3 



1 Mr. Alexander Gibb in the notes which he has supplied to the editor 
writes : ' This word cannot represent the respectable clan of Macleans, which at 
the place and date would have been Mac-Ghille Eoin.' 

2 Proceedings^ vol. xx. pp. 148 ff. 

3 Mr. Edward Gwynn, Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, has furnished the 
editor with a reference to the ' Vision of Mac Conglinne ' (ed. K. Meyer). 



INTRODUCTION lv 

The notices here recorded of schools at Dunblane, Dunkeld, 
and Muthill make a valuable addition to the notices of schools 
at Abernethy, Arbuthnott, Perth, Stirling, Lanark, Ayr, Elgin, 
Glasgow, St. Andrews, Roxburgh, and South Berwick (Berwick- 
on-Tweed) collected by Mr. Joseph Robertson in his erudite 
essay on Scholastic Offices in the Scottish Church in the Twelfth 
and Thirteenth Centuries. 1 

It may be observed that none of these appear to have been, 
strictly speaking, monastic schools. And it may be reasonably 
believed that such schools were more numerous than the notices 
preserved in written records might lead some to imagine, for 
our knowledge of the existence of schools in some of the places 
mentioned is due solely to such accidents as that a master of a 
school was called to test a charter, or was appointed to serve 
on some ecclesiastical commission. 

About, perhaps, 1224 Gregory, Bishop of Brechin, conferred 
on Lindores the right to appoint the masters to the schools 
of Dundee and the neighbourhood; 2 and that the abbey 
exercised the right we have evidence in a notarial instrument 
of 22nd August 1424, dealing with a dispute (the details of 
which are obscure) between the bishop and a priest named 
Gilbert Knycht, who claimed the mastership of the school of 
Dundee. 3 

It is, perhaps, worth observing that there seems to be 
evidence that ' Master Laurence, archdeacon of St. Andrews, 1 
who was one of the judges delegate in the cause concerning the 
land of Eglesmagril and the church of that vill (No. XLII.), was 



MacConglinne, who is a wandering scholar, is usually called scolaige, but also 
mac legind (pp. 47, 52, 54, etc.)- The s at the end of the word 'Macleins' 
looks as though the writer of the charter had put the sign of an English plural 
to the Celtic word. 

1 To the schools enumerated above may be added a school at Linlithgow 
noticed in a bull of Gregory vin. in 1187, and in repeated confirmations by 
Clement in., Innocent in., Honorius in., and Innocent iv. The school be- 
longed, like the church of Linlithgow, to the Priory of St. Andrews. See 
Reg. Prior. S. Andr,, pp. 63, 68, 72, 77, 92, 99. 

2 Lib. S. Marie de Lundoris, p. 17. 3 Reg. Brechin., i. pp. 62, 63. 



Ivi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

himself ' Ferleighmn ' of St. Andrews. Pope Innocent in., in 
a controversy between ' the Master of the schools of the city 
of St. Andrews and the same city,'' on the one part, and the 
prior and convent of St. Andrews, on the other, had appointed 
judges delegate with the assent of Master Laurence, who was 
' archdeacon and Ferlanus of St. Andrews/ 1 Before leaving 
the notices in the Chartulary of schools in the thirteenth 
century we may call attention to the school of Aberdeen 
in 1281, the master of the schools being also at the time 
the rural dean, or, to use the more common Scottish term, 
' the dean of Christianity' of that place (No. cxxv.). 2 

BENEFACTORS OF THE MONASTERY 

Not long after the foundation of the abbey the patronage 
of the church of Leslie in the Garioch was granted to Lindores 
by ' Norman, son of Malcolm, 1 of the family which afterwards 
assumed the name of Leslie (No. Lxxxi.). 3 This Norman is 
' Norman, the Constable ' (Nos. LXXXIII., LXXXIV.). He survived 
Earl David, for we find Earl John confirming to him the lands 
of Leslie with the exception of ' that gift of the church of Leslie 
which the said Norman gave to the Abbey of Lindores and the 
monks there serving God, as the charter of Norman which the 
said monks possess testifies/ 4 It was to Norman's father, 

1 Reg. Prior. S. Andr., pp. 317, 318. He is mentioned as distinct from 
the Master of the Schools, to whom he was superior in office. Master Laurence 
appears again (No. xcvi.) as among those who by friendly intervention brought 
to a termination a dispute between the monks of Lindores and the bishop of 
St. Andrews as to the revenues of certain lands in Garioch. He is probably the 
Master Laurence who in 1207 was Official of St. Andrews. Calendar of Papal 
Registers, i. 28. 

2 The full term ' dean of Christianity ' distinguishes this person from the dean 
of the Cathedral. The ' dean of Christianity ' of Aberdeen had in his deanery 
the parishes of Balhelvy, Banchory Devenick, Culter, Banchory Ternan, Echt, 
St. Machar, St. Nicholas, and Dulmayok. Reg. Aberdon., ii. 54. 

3 This charter must be dated between 1199 and I3th October 1207, when John, 
Bishop of Aberdeen, one of the witnesses, died. 

4 The text of the original will be found in Alacfarlane 's Genealogical Collections 
(edited for the Scottish History Society by Mr. J. T. Clark), vol. ii. p. 454, and 
in Collections of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, p. 547. 



INTRODUCTION Ivii 

' Malcolm, son of BartholfiV that the lands of Leslie had been 
granted originally by Earl David. 1 In Charter LXXXIV. 'Norman, 
son of Norman, the Constable/ styles himself 'Norman de 
Lescelin. 1 This is a considerably earlier date for the assumption 
of the surname than that given in Macfarlane. 2 

NEYFSHIP 

The little group of Leslie charters supplies a glimpse of the 
existence of bondmen on the estate of Leslie. In 1253 John, 
son of Thomas, and all the sequela, the issue of his own body, 
are quitclaimed to the Abbey of Lindores, and released from 
all jus ligacionis which Norman, son of the Constable, possessed 
over them (LXXXIV.). The word sequela applied to the offspring 
of bondmen is the word commonly used in the old charters for 
the young of animals still following the dam. 3 The passage 
before us is a particularly clear example of the application of 
the word to the young of bondmen. If Ducange had known 
it, we should have had a less vague and hesitating article on 
the word in the Glossarmm. Cosmo Innes, speaking of the 
application of the word to bondmen, remarks that it is used 
' j ust as a horse-dealer now sells a mare with her followers.'' 4 
It would seem that the grant of the church lands in Garioch 
cum hominibus manentibus in ipsis terris et eorum sequela (No. iv.) 
was a transfer of the lands and the neyfs astricted to those 
lands. I have not investigated the question of how long such 
transfers of neyfs continued in Scotland ; but in 1375 we have 
a grant by Robert n. of all and singular his lands of the 
Thanage of Kintore to the Earl of Moray and Marjory his 
wife, in fee and heritage 'in bondis, bondagiis, nativis et 
eorum sequelis." 15 And in 1413 the same language in a 
charter by Robert, Duke of Albany, to John Stewart, Earl 






1 See Macfarlane, ibid. p. 453. 2 P. 455. 

3 See an example at p. 185. 4 Scotch Legal Antiqiiities^ p. 51* 

5 Reg. Mag. Sigil., p. 140., No. 72. 



Iviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

of Buchan. 1 Yet while the old language of the charters 
persisted, the institution of neyfship was dying out. 2 



THE PROCESS OF THE TRANSFER OF PARISH CHURCHES TO 
MONASTERIES in proprios usus 

To return to the subject of the grants of parish churches to 
monasteries in proprios usus, it may be observed that our 
Chartulary illustrates the steps of the transfer in more than 
one case. The amplest details occur in the case of the last of 
the parish churches noticed in our Chartulary as added to the 
' appropriate ' list of Lindores. Collessie, adjoining the parish 
of Lindores or Abdie (Ebedyn), was granted to the monastery 
in 1262. Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winton, Constable of 
Scotland, 3 had his chief seat in Scotland at Locres (Leuchars) 
in the neighbourhood. The property in Fife, besides other 
Scottish estates, had come into possession of the family by the 
marriage of his grandfather, Robert de Quincy, with Orabile, 
daughter and heir of Ness, Lord of Leuchars. The moor of 
Kyndeloch (Kinloch) near Collessie, the moor of Edyn, and 
the peat-moss of Monagrey (mentioned in Charter cxxxvu.) 
had already afforded Earl Roger the opportunity of doing a 
kindness to the monks of Lindores by his grant of broom, 
heather, and peats from these places, together with other 
privileges, such as commonage for some of their cattle, and a 
right-of-way (Hberum chymnachium) through all his lands. To 
these benefactions he, as patron, now added the church of 
Collessie with all its pertinents, in usus proprios, if they can 
obtain in any measure leave for this transfer. The consent of 
the bishop of the diocese is what is pointed to. He made the 



1 Reg. Mag. SigiL p. 256, No. 28. 

2 Mr. Cosmo Innes writes, 'The last claim of neyfship or serfdom proved in a 
Scotch Court was in 1364.' Scotch Legal Antiquities, p. 159. 

3 De Quincy became Constable through his marriage with Helen, eldest 
daughter and co-heir of Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Galloway, Constable of 
Scotland. 



INTRODUCTION lix 

grant as far as it lay in his power to make it, or, as it is 
expressed in the bishop's charter of concession, quantum in 
ipsofuit. 1 

But at the time of the grant the church of Collessie was not 
vacant. The rector was a well-known man in his day, Master 
Adam of Malcarviston, a chaplain of the Pope, and provost of 
St. Mary's Church in the city of St. Andrews, who a few years 
before had been employed by Alexander in. as an envoy to 
the court of Henry in. of England. 2 The grant accordingly 
could only be effective on the rector's resignation or death 
(cedente vel decedente). His resignation had, no doubt, been 
anticipated and arranged for. 3 The Bishop of St. Andrews, 
Gamelin, confirmed the grant, with the usual reservation of a 
sufficient and decent maintenance for the vicar, and of his own 
and his successors' episcopal dues. One may suspect that it 
was not a scruple as to being a pluralist which induced the 
provost of St. Mary's to resign, for a notice in the Calendar of 
Papal Registers 4 shows him in the following year as rector of 
the neighbouring parish of Syreys (Ceres). 

The Bishop of St. Andrews seems to have secured rather 
good terms for the vicar of Collessie, for we find him paying a 
tithe of twenty shillings to Boiamund in 1276. 5 But what 
was the share that fell to Lindores it seems impossible to say. 

Shortly afterwards (in 1263) additional security was obtained 
by a confirmation granted by the king. 6 

Whether technically it was absolutely necessary for a bishop 
to obtain the assent of his cathedral chapter to such transfers 
of parochial churches may not be clear ; but the practice seems 



1 P. 189. 

2 In 1258. See Bain's Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland^ i. Nos. 
2126, 2127. 

3 The Bishop of St. Andrews confirms De Quincy's grant, subject to the 
resignation of Malcarviston, on 5th June 1262, and Malcarviston resigned the 
church into the hands of Thomas, Abbot of Lindores, on nth June. 

4 Vol. i. p. 391. 5 Theiner's Monumenta, p. 114. 
6 No. cxxxn. 



Ix THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

to have prevailed, and in the present case the prior and con- 
vent of canons regular at St. Andrews who formed the chapter 
of the cathedral did, as a matter of fact, confirm the grant of 
Earl Roger and the concession of the bishop. This may have 
been, however, only ad majorem cautelam ; for in questions of 
property, ecclesiastical as well as secular, the lawyers seemed 
never weary of obtaining confirmations from every one who 
could by any possibility be supposed to have an interest in 
raising objections. Successive confirmations of the same grant 
by successive bishops were common, as though the force of the 
original confirmation terminated with the life of him who 
granted it. Thus in respect to the original grant of the 
parish church of Lindores we have episcopal confirmations by 
successive bishops of St. Andrews : Roger de Beaumont (1198- 
1202); William Mai voisine (1202-1238); David de Bernham, 
(1239-1252) ; and Gamelin (1255-1271). 1 In like manner the 
appropriation of the parish church of Collessie is confirmed 
not only, as we have seen, by Bishop Gamelin, but subsequently 
by Bishop William Wiseheart (1273-1279). 2 

The bishops had a personal interest in securing to the vicars 
of appropriate churches a sufficient maintenance. There were 
certain ' burdens ' on the parish which went to the upkeep of 
the diocesan establishment ; and these had, as a rule, to be 
met by the vicars. The heaviest of these burdens was what 
was known as 'procurations, 1 a term originally applied to 
the hospitable entertainment of the bishop and archdeacon, 
with their respective retinues, when engaged on their official 
visitations of the churches of the diocese. Such hospitable 
entertainment was at a later date commuted to an annual 
payment in money, the amount of which was often consider- 
able. The Register of the Bishopric of Aberdeen enables us 
to state the amount of the procurations of the several churches 
appropriate to Lindores in the Garioch in the latter half of 



1 Nos. cvn.-cx. 2 Nos. CXLV., CXLVI. 



INTRODUCTION Ixi 

the thirteenth century. Fintray, Inverury, Kinnethmond, 
Culsalmond, Insch, and Durnach paid 2Kb. each ; Leslie and 
Premnay llib. 6s. 8d. each; and Rathmuriel 13s. 4d. 1 The 
Bishop of Aberdeen received from procurations throughout 
his whole diocese the then very considerable sum of 1171ib. 10s. 2 

Another burden was a small payment made annually to the 
bishop by way of recognition of subjection. This was com- 
monly known in Scotland and England as a * synodal, 1 3 and 
corresponds to what is sometimes styled ' cathedraticum.' 
The name 'synodal' has been supposed to have originated 
from the payment being made when the clergy attended the 
diocesan synod, while '* cathedraticum ' is, doubtless, employed 
to signify the recognition of the bishop's chair. These two 
charges ' procurations ' and ' synodals ' formed the bishop's 
dues (episcopalia\ referred to in the bull of Gregory rx. 4 

In addition to 'ordinary burdens' there were ' extraordinary 
burdens ' to be met by the beneficiaries in the case of parish 
churches. Thus the cost of the building of the manse was to 
be defrayed by the rector and the vicar in proportion to the 
share of the revenues of the parish which they respectively 
received. The upkeep of the manse fell wholly on the vicar. 5 
The repair of the chancels of parish churches had to be borne 
by the clergy, and, according to the Scottish statutes of the 
thirteenth century, by the 'parsons,' that is, the rectors. 6 
But it is evident from the Chartulary 7 that the monastery of 
Lindores demanded of their vicars in the Garioch that they 
should pay their proportion de fabrica cancellarum suarum 
ecclesiarum. And it appears that this demand, though dis- 



1 Reg. Aberdon.^ ii. 55. There is reason to believe that the incomes of the 
vicars as stated at p. xlvii, represent the incomes after the payment of procura- 
tions and other dues. 

2 Ibid. p. 56. 

3 See p. 129. While Synodale is the more frequent form, we also find the 
word Synodaticiim. See Reg. Morav., p. 364. 

4 No. xcvill. 5 Statuta Eccl. Scotican., ii. p, 13. 
6 Ibid. p. ii. 7 No. xcn. 



Ixii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

puted by certain of the vicars, was allowed by the decision of 
the judges delegated by the Pope to determine the question. 

It may be added, that in England we find it ordered (A.D. 
1305) in the constitutions of Robert Winchelsey, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, that the repair of the chancels of parish 
churches should be borne by the vicars as well as the rectors ; l 
and it is possible that there may have been some alteration 
of the Scottish statute before the time (A.D. 1375) when the 
dispute between the monastery and their vicars was settled. 

During the earlier part of the period with which we 
are concerned no doubt was entertained that the owner 
of the land from which tithe was derived could, after due 
provision for the performance of the spiritual duties of the 
parish, determine the destination of the revenue to a religious 
house. It was a way in which powerful friends might be 
made. 2 But, distinct from such motives, the records are 
practically unanimous in showing that the desire for prayers 
pro salute animarum which might be secured from the monas- 
teries formed a potent factor in these grants. With the then 
universal belief that such prayers could benefit the souls in 
Purgatory, natural affection no less than rational self-interest 
suggested or encouraged the bestowment of gifts that would 
secure this end. At first the terms of the charters of con- 
veyance were general and somewhat vague. The donors looked 
for 4 devout prayers for the weal of the soul ' ; and further 
specification is often lacking. The names, indeed, of those 
for whose benefit the gift was made are entered in the record ; 



1 Wilkins, Concilia Magnae Britanniae, ii. p. 280. 

2 In Thomas Gascoigne's entertaining Liber Veritatum, we have several 
examples of the granting of churches to monasteries in proprios usus in England 
in the fifteenth century where material advantages as well as ' devout prayers ' 
were the return of the monastery. Let one example suffice : ' Nuper enim unus 
comes fecit ecclesiam de Haghkarth appropriare monachis albis de Gervas ad 
valorem annuatim centum librarum, et ille comes habet sibi et heredibus suis de 
eadem abbathia terras de eorum fundatione, quae valent annuatim xl. libras. 
. . . pro ilia appropriacione.' Loci e libra veritatum (edited byj. E. Thorold 
Rogers), p. 6. 



INTRODUCTION Ixiii 

but, as years ran on, it seemed to be recognised that it was 
safer to specify the times, and often the place or particular 
altar where Mass, on the 'anniversary,' or weekly, or twice 
or three times a week, or daily, was to be celebrated. What 
could be done by any one at any time might come to be 
forgotten or but imperfectly attended to. 

For the illustration of this subject our Chart ulary is sin- 
gularly barren when compared with several of the Scottish 
registers, but there are two or three cases which may be 
noticed. At an early date (for three sons of Earl David are 
witnesses to the instrument) William de Campania grants 
three marks a year for the singing of a Mass every day for the 
soul of his father, Robert de Campania, who was buried in the 
abbey church of Lindores. The Mass was to be celebrated at 
the altar of St. Nicholas. 1 The three marks were made a 
charge on the land of Stokes in the county of Leicester. 2 The 
Lady Ysabel de Brus (second daughter of Earl David) makes 
a grant of land near Dundee on condition that the revenue 
derivable therefrom should be for the maintenance of one 
monk who at Lindores would in all time coming celebrate 
Mass for the souls of herself, her ancestors, and successors. 3 
The fifteenth century presents us with charters generally 
much more full and specific than those of early date in 
declaring the exact character of the religious services which 
were expected in return for grants of money or land. Such 



1 It is often only from notices of this kind that we learn the dedications of the 
altars of cathedrals, collegiate churches, and monasteries. The piscinae and 
ambries of several altars still remain among the ruins of Lindores. Mr. Laing 
has recorded notices of altars of St. Mary, St. Dionysius, and St. John. 
Lindores Abbey, pp. 92, 192, 195. To these we can now add the altar of 
St. Nicholas. I have not been able to find the authority for an altar of 
St. Michael in the abbey, and suspect that Mr. Laing has made a mistake in 
mentioning it. 

2 As one of the witnesses is 'John, Earl of Chester and Huntingdon,' this 
charter (No. i.xxxvn.) must be dated between 1232, when John became Earl of 
Chester, and 1237, when he died. 

3 No. XL. It is somewhat remarkable that the soul of her husband is not 
mentioned. Does this suggest a domestic quarrel ? 



Ixiv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

documents are to be found in abundance in the records of the 
Scottish cathedrals and collegiate churches, and not in- 
frequently in the registers of the monasteries. One specimen 
of that period is preserved in the Lindores Chartulary. In 
1479, Thomas Rossy, vicar of Inchestur, 1 professes his belief 
that by pious prayers and the celebration of Masses sins were 
remitted, the pains of Purgatory mitigated, souls released 
from such pains, and carried to the joys of Paradise, and 
therefore grants to Lindores certain lands and a dwelling- 
house on the condition that every year on the anniversary 
of his dearest uncle, James de Rossy, late abbot of Lindores, 
a solemn Mass of requiem should be sung at the great altar of 
the monastery for his own soul, the soul of his uncle, and the 
souls of all the faithful departed, which Mass was to be pre- 
ceded, on the night before, by the vigils of the dead. 2 

SECOND TITHES 

In the pages of the Chartulary there are several references 
to what are styled 'second tithes' (decimae secundae). The 
term was applied to certain grants made to the Church over 
and above the tithes which were obligatory under the general 
law of tithe. Such grants were purely voluntary and dictated 
by motives of piety. Rents and dues, ordinarily payable in 
kind, came to the lord of the soil after the customary tithing 
of farm produce. He was under no obligation to make any 
grant for religious purposes from such. But there are many 
examples of the devotion of kings or nobles tithing this 
revenue. Again there were gains (lucra) coming to the crown, 
or to the great feudal lords, from other sources. There were 
the fines and escheats of their respective courts, and there 
were important gains from feudal casualties, such as ward, 
relief, and marriage. Of all these the devout not uncommonly 
made an additional grant of a tithe to religion. In certain 



1 Inchture in Cowrie. 2 No. CLI. 



INTRODUCTION Ixv 

cases we find that even as much as an eighth was so granted. 
The dues known as ' cane' were also not infrequently tithed. 

Early grants to the bishoprics or the monasteries made by 
the crown commonly included a ' tenth penny,' sometimes an 
4 eighth penny,' of all the fines and escheats of the courts of 
the Justiciar, Chamberlain, and Sheriff; and even when a fine 
was remitted to the offender by the crown the Church was still 
treated as though entitled to the tenth, or the eighth, as the 
case might be. As the fines of the courts were, in early times, 
ordinarily paid in cattle, it is not difficult to understand how 
the term ' second tithe' came to be used of such tithings. 

The example set by kings came soon to be followed by the 
great lords. They had their own courts and their own canes, 
which piety suggested that they too should tithe. 

Of royal grants of this kind we have examples in the king's 
grant of the tithe of his cane (or custom dues) of ships coming 
to the port of Aberdeen, of his rents from the burgh, and 
from his thanages in the country, and of the fines and escheats 
of all his courts in the sheriffdom of Aberdeen and Banff, all 
these being made over to the bishop and cathedral of Aber- 
deen. 1 Subsequent records leave no doubt that the tithe of 
the ' reliefs ' due to the crown was paid to the Bishop of 
Aberdeen. Thus, in 1695 the relief of the lands of Strath- 
bolgy, on the death of Sir John de Gordon, due to King 
Robert m., amounted to seven hundred marks. The king 
ordered a tithe, viz. 461ib. 13s. 4d., to be paid to the Bishop 
of Aberdeen from his treasury. 2 The profit of ' wards,' 
it is also stated, was tithed to the bishopric of Aberdeen. 3 
Similar grants, though not quite so extensive, were made 
the bishop and cathedral of Moray. 4 The loss of the 

:lesiastical records in the cases of Ross and Caithness 
>, in regard to this subject, supplied in a measure by the 



1 Reg. Aberdon., i. pp. 9, 17, 18. 2 Ibid. i. pp. 198-201. 

3 Ibid. p. 200. 4 Reg. Morav., Nos. 2, 7, 17. 



Ixvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Exchequer Rolls, from which it appears that these two 
bishoprics benefited at least from the fines of the king's 
courts. 1 The bishopric of Brechin enjoyed second tithes 
from the gains pertaining to the king out of the shire of 
Kincardine, derivable not only from fines and escheats, but 
also from the feudal casualties of ward, relief, and marriage. 
And it is clearly implied that these latter also furnished a 
tenth penny in other cases. 2 The see of Glasgow was more 
particularly honoured. David, the restorer of the bishopric, 
added to numerous endowments an eighth penny from his 
courts throughout the whole of Cumbria ; while it had a tithe 
of the king's cane in animalibus et porcis in Strathgrif (Ren- 
frewshire), Cunningham, Kyle, and Carrick. 3 Dunkeld had a 
tithe of the issues of the king's courts in Strathern and 
Stormonth. 4 

Certain of the monasteries were granted favours of a like 
kind. The Abbey of Holyrood had, by its foundation charter, 
a tithe of the issues of the courts and of others of the king's 
lucra from the Avin (Amond Water) to Colbrandspade (Cock- 
burnspath), that is in the counties of Mid-Lothian and East- 
Lothian, and half the tithe of similar ' perquisites of the king 1 
in Kintyre and Argyll. The abbey of Scone had a tenth of 
the issues of the courts in Gowrie. 5 The priory of Restennet 
had a tenth from the courts of Forfarshire. 6 The Abbey of 
Dunfermline had an eighth from the courts in Fife. 7 The 
priory of the Isle of May was entitled to a tenth penny of the 
king's cane from the ports of Anstruther and Pittenweem. 8 

These examples of royal munificence (and they could be 
easily multiplied) may now be supplemented by a few illustrat- 
ing the action of the nobility. Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, 



1 Exch. Rolls, i. pp. 19, 20. 2 Reg. Brechin. , i. pp. 35, 36. 

3 Reg. Glasguen., i. p. 12. 4 Exch. Rolls, i. p. 1 8. 

5 Ibid., i. 2, 3, 1 8, 557. 

6 Reg. Brechin., i. No. 25. See also Exch. Rolls, i. p. 9. 

7 Exch. Rolls, i. 562, 563. 8 Carte Prioratus Insule de May, p. 9. 



INTRODUCTION Ixvii 

was the founder of Inchaffray, and to that monastery he 
granted a tithe of all his canes and rents in wheat, malt, meal, 
and cheese, a tithe of the fish which came to his kitchen, a 
tithe of his venison, a tithe of all the gains from his courts 
and of all ' obventions,' including, perhaps, under the latter 
term his feudal casualties. 1 Malise, brother of Gilbert, Earl 
of Strathern, was a generous benefactor of the monastery of 
Lindores, founded by his wife's father; and he gave to it 
second tithes from his ' cane and rents.' 2 Morgrund, Earl of 
Mar, granted to the canons-regular of St. Andrews a tithe of 
all the revenues from all his land and a tithe of all his courts 
and of his ' reliefs. 13 

As lord of Garioch, Earl David made a grant to Lindores 
as munificent in spirit, if not as great in extent, as that of any 
kingly founder. 4 On his death there appears to have been 
some disinclination or neglect in rendering the second tithes 
from Garioch. Earl John's bailiff or, to use the more 
common Scottish term, bailie, Simon of Garentully seems to 
have been remiss, and then litigious. In 1234 the value of 
the arrears of the second tithes was computed, and, not pay- 
ment, but an acknowledgment of his indebtedness given by 
Earl John to the monks of Lindores, together with a man- 
date to his bailiffs to pay the second tithes of Garioch in 
the future. 5 

Second tithes, from their nature, must have been difficult to 
collect, and were probably a source of annoyance to both 
parties. At all events at an early date we find an inclination 
on the part of the monastery to accept some equivalent in the 
shape either of a money payment made yearly, or of a grant 
of land given them in exchange. Thus, Simon of Garentully, 
already referred to, who had been granted by Earl John 
certain lands in his northern lordship, burdened, of course, 



1 Reg. de Inchaf. , p. 4. 2 No. xxi v. 

3 Reg. Prior. S. Andr., p. 247. 4 See No. n. 

5 Nos. xx., xxi. 



Ixviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

with second tithes, seems to have refused to pay them. Liti- 
gation ensued, and the question was appealed to Rome. The 
Pope appointed judges delegate to determine the dispute; 
but at this stage the matter was amicably settled on the 
intervention of friends, Simon taking on himself the obliga- 
tion to pay annually eight shillings sterling in lieu of the 
second tithes due out of his holdings at Cremond and Eden- 
gerrock. It seems probable that after the death of Earl John 
his Scottish property, like that in England, was divided 
among the families of his three sisters. At any rate we now 
find members of the families of Brus, Balliol, and Hastinges 
holding property in the Garioch. Robert de Brus, lord of 
Annandale, grandson of Earl David through Isabel, his second 
daughter, exchanged his land, called the * vill of William ' 
(Williamstown), in the Garioch for the second tithes which 
the abbot and convent of Lindores had been accustomed to 
receive from his lands, profits, pleas, and escheats. 1 A similar 
course was adopted by Henry de Hastinges, a grandson 
through Earl David's youngest daughter, who gave his whole 
vill of Eland res in exchange for the second tithes of his 
property. Something of the same kind (though here there 
are certain reservations) took place in the case of the property 
of Gocelin de Balliol, on whom his brother, John de Balliol, 
descended from Earl David's eldest daughter, had bestowed 
certain lands in the same lordship. 2 Lastly, the second tithes 
of the property of Malise in Stratherne were redeemed by his 
nephew Fergus (son of Earl Gilbert) with a grant of the lands 
of Fedal. 3 

PRIVATE CHAPELS 

The law and usage of the Church with respect to the erec- 
tion of private chapels are well illustrated from entries in the 
Chartulary. The essential principle on which the ecclesiasti- 



1 No. cxvi. 2 No. cxxni. 3 No. xxiv. 



INTRODUCTION Ixix 

cal authorities insisted was that the parish church, or mother- 
church (matrix ecclesia), as it was styled, should not suffer. 

Early in the thirteenth century Simon of Garentully 
desired a chapel at his manor of Cremond, in the parish of 
Inverury, the church of which was appropriate of Lindores. 
The abbot and the convent consent on the conditions that it 
was to be used only by the members of his private family, who 
were nevertheless to attend the mother-church on the princi- 
pal feasts, that the tenants were, more debito, to continue to 
attend the parish church, and that all the ' obventions ' 
coming to the chapel were to be paid in full to the parish 
church. Simon, his heirs, and his chaplains were to do fealty 
to the parish church, and, as ' recognition, 1 Simon and his 
heirs engaged to give yearly to the parish church two pounds 
of wax (No. LVIIL). 

About the same time Sir Bartholomew Fleming (Flandrensis) 
sought permission for a chapel at Weredors (Wardhouse), in 
the parish of Insch (Inchemabanin). In consideration he 
granted certain lands and a right of commonage to the church 
of St. Drostan at Insch and the ' rectors ' of the same, 1 and 
further undertook that that church should suffer no loss 
(No. LIX.). 

William of Brechin, grandson of Earl David, had a chapel 
in his castle at Lindores, situated apparently on the north of 
the loch. He obtained leave for the celebration of divine 
service in the chapel on condition that the chaplain should 
render canonical obedience to the mother-church of Abdie, 
and pay over to it all the oblations made in the chapel. The 
6 recognition ' of the mother-church was the yearly gift of a 
pound of incense (No. Lxn.). 2 



1 The gift was not to the Vicar of Insch, but to the convent of Lindores, 
which was rector of the parish. 

2 ' Recognitions ' in ecclesiastical charters are ordinarily trifling payments, 
resembling ' blench-duties ' in the case of feudal holdings, serving as acknowledg- 
ments of subjection. 



Ixx THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

The case of the chapel of Dundemore (Dunmore) in the 
same parish of Lindores, or Abdie, is somewhat different. 
It seems to have existed as a chapel of Lindores as early, at 
least, as 1198. 1 It was not, apparently, a private chapel, but 
was for the convenience of the parishioners in its neighbour- 
hood; but it would seem that the services there had been 
discontinued by the monks, and the matter was brought by 
Sir Henry de Dundemor 2 to the notice of the Bishop of St. 
Andrews, David de Bernham, whose pontifical offices form 
the solitary liturgical relic of Scotland in the thirteenth 
century. 3 The bishop heard the cause in his synod at Perth 
in 1248, and pronounced his decision. The monks were to 
pay yearly to Sir Henry twenty-five shillings for the main- 
tenance of a chaplain, and to provide in the first instance a 
chalice, and the necessary books and vestments. Afterwards 
the ornamenta of the chapel were to be kept up at the cost 
of Sir Henry. As usual, it was stipulated that all the obla- 
tions of the chapel should go to the mother-church. And all 
the parishioners at Dundemore, with the exception of the 
household, were to attend the mother-church at Christmas, 
Easter, and the feast of St. Andrew. 

There is an interesting memorandum (No. LXIV.) of the 
ornamenta of the chapel of Dundemore supplied according to 
agreement by the convent. They were a silver chalice, a full 
vestment, 4 and a missal. 5 

1 Indeed it would seem that there was more than one chapel in that district 
of the parish at that date, ' capellas de Dundemore,' p. 108. 

2 Several notices of the family of Dundemore will be found in Laing's Lindores 
Abbey, pp. 434-6. 

3 Scotland has not the honour of possessing the precious manuscript, which is 
deposited in the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris (No. 138 fonds du Supplement ', 
Latin}. It was printed at the Pitsligo Press, and published in 1885 under the 
editorship of Mr. Christopher Wordsworth. 

4 The term vestimentum plenarium is commonly used to denote not only a 
chasuble, but all the other necessary parts of the celebrant's official dress, such 
as amice, stole, maniple, etc. 

5 The description of this book will be of interest to students of liturgical 
bibliography. It contained the Psalter, the Hymnary, the Legenda, the 
Antiphonary, the Grail, and the whole service of the whole year. Through the 



INTRODUCTION Ixxi 

It would seem that in the thirteenth century there was a 
considerable growth of the fashion of having private chapels 
in the castles and manors of the nobles and lesser barons. It 
was naturally looked on with dislike by the parochial clergy; 
and the matter was thought worthy of being made the subject 
of synodical legislation. In the statute, ' De capellis non 
construendis, 1 in the body of Scottish canons enacted in the 
thirteenth century, it was laid down that no chapel or oratory 
should be built without the consent of the diocesan, and in 
those which had already been built divine service should not 
be celebrated without a like consent and authority. To this 
a little later an addition was made to the effect that, inas- 
much as the foregoing statute was in many places not fully 
observed, the bishops should, each in his own diocese, care- 
fully inquire by what right and by whose authority such 
chapels had been built; and, if they were dissatisfied as to 
the results of their inquiries, the chapels were to be suspended. 
And it is further provided expressly that by whatever authority 
a chapel had been built it was of obligation that the mother- 
church should suffer no loss. If there was a special privilege 
alleged in any case it should be exhibited to the satisfaction 
of the Ordinary. Otherwise those offending should be 
suspended ipso jure. 1 The practice of having private chapels 
in the houses of the great continued to grow ; and as late as 
1521 John Major, 2 an unprejudiced witness, tells us that 



kindness of Dr. Swete, Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge, and Canon 
Christopher Wordsworth, the editor is able to state that missals of the type above 
described occasionally, but rarely, occur. The Dean of Sarum in 1224 found on 
one of his visitations ' Missale vetus inordinate compositum continens psalterium 
et ympnarium : collectarium cum notula et cum tropario.' Register of St. 
Osmund (Rolls Series), i. 314. The ' missal ' given to the chapel at Dundemore 
is so described as to suggest that possibly it may have contained the whole 
breviary as well as the service of the Mass. 

1 Statuta Ecclesiae Scoticanae, vol. ii. p. 1 1, and the notes p. 258, where 
Joseph Robertson, with his usual wealth of erudition amply illustrates the text. 
The vast extent of some of the Scottish parishes was, in certain cases, a reasonable 
ground for the erection of chapels for the general use of the parishioners. 

2 Hist. Maj. Brit., lib. i. cap. 6, p. 20, edit. 1740. 



Ixxii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

every little laird (injimus qidsque dominus) kept one chaplain, 
and sometimes more, according to his means. He contrasts, 
very unfavourably to his own country in this respect, the 
condition of England and its numerous and comparatively 
small parishes with the parochial arrangements of Scotland, 
and points out how in many cases parishioners in remote 
districts were dependent on private chapels for the hearing 
of divine service. 

From the first the Abbey of Lindores had been specially 
protected by bulls from Rome 1 against the erection of places 
of worship within the parishes appropriated, unless with 
the consent of the convent and the diocesan, salvis privileges 
Romanorum Pontificum. Here, as in so many other matters 
of administration, the Pope claimed the power of granting 
leave, though it was refused by others having ordinary authority. 
And it is perhaps to this right that reference is made in the 
statute of the Scottish Council cited above where it speaks of 
the exhibition to the bishop of an alleged ' special privilege. ' 
In England certainly it was not uncommon to obtain from 
Rome the authority for the erection of a private chapel. In 
the petitions to the Pope for this privilege distance from the 
parish church is commonly pleaded ; or sometimes the badness 
or dangerous character of the road; and it is commonly promised 
that there shall be no loss to the parish church. 2 Opposition 
from parish churches was so sure to be expected that even the 
colleges of Oxford, when petitioning for permission to have a 
chapel, sometimes stipulated that the rights of the parish 
church would be respected. 3 



1 See Nos. xcm., xciv. 

2 Reference to the volume of ' Petitions ' in the Calendar of Papal Registers will 
supply many illustrations. One must here suffice. William de Clinton, Earl 
of Huntingdon, petitions (1350) for a chapel because his manor of Maystoke is 
on the edge of the parish, the road to the church lying through more than a 
league of wood, and often flooded in winter (p. 192). 

3 For example, Balliol and Queen's. Calendar of Papal Registers (Petitions 
I.) pp. 479, 489. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxiii 

The general usage in Scotland with respect to the erection 
of private chapels may be illustrated by a few examples from 
sources other than the Chartulary of Lindores. In 1243, 
with the consent of Bishop David de Bernham and of the 
prior and convent of St. Andrews, Alexander of Stirling 
founded a chantry in his chapel of Laurenston in the parish 
of Egglisgrig (St. Cyrus) which belonged to the convent : he 
pledging himself that he would bear all the expenses ; that all 
the oblations and obventions coming to the chapel should be 
paid in full to the mother-church ; and that, in ' recognition 
of subjection, 1 he and his heirs would pay a pound of wax 
annually. The chaplain before he celebrated there was to 
take an oath of fealty to the mother-church ; and any failure 
to fulfil the obligations set forth was to be followed by the 
cessation of the celebration of divine service in the chapel. 1 
Sometimes the right to have a private chapel was practically 
bought for a grant of land, or an annual payment, oblations, 
and obventions at the chapel going, as in other cases, to the 
parish church. Of such an arrangement we have examples 
in Bernard Eraser's chapel of Drem in the parish of Hadding- 
ton, and in the private chapel at Ochiltree in the parish of 
Linlithgow. 2 

EXEMPTIONS OF THE LANDS OF RELIGIOUS HOUSES FROM 
MILITARY SERVICE 

Students of the ecclesiastical records of the Church of 
England in the mediaeval period when they turn to the corre- 
sponding Scottish records must be struck by the generally 
prevailing advantages of the form of land-tenure in the 
Scottish Church. While the church-lands of England were 
very largely held by military tenure, indistinguishable from 
that of fiefs held by secular persons, such cases were in Scotland 
rare and exceptional. Almost universally when land was 



1 Reg. Prior, S. An Jr., p. 280. 2 Ibid., pp. 321, 322. 



Ixxiv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

granted in Scotland to the Church, it was granted in frank- 
almoign (in liberam elemosinani) ; and when granted by 
sub-infeudation, the military service due from the land was 
ordinarily undertaken by the immediate superior who made 
the grant. It is not implied, of course, that the vassals of 
the Church were exempt from the obligations of joining in a 
general levy to resist foreign invasion; but it was no small 
advantage to be freed from the necessity of supplying the 
attendance of armed men to the ordinary ' hostings ' of the 
kings. It was a heavy burden on the English monasteries to 
supply their annual quota to the army, which varied with the 
extents of their lands. Thus, to cite a few examples, Abingdon 
had to furnish thirty knights (that is, thirty heavy-armed 
horsemen) for a forty days' service in the year ; Glastonbury, 
forty (at one time sixty) ; St. Edmundsbury, forty ; Hyde, 
twenty ; Coventry, ten ; St. Albans, six ; Evesham, five ; Peter- 
borough, sixty. The lands of the cathedrals were similarly 
burdened. Bath furnished twenty knights ; London, twenty ; 
Salisbury, thirty-two ; Canterbury, sixty ; Winchester, sixty ; 
Lincoln, sixty ; Worcester, fifty ; Norwich and Ely, forty 
each. 1 

The rare exceptions to the general immunity of the religious 
houses of Scotland only help to emphasise the contrast. Thus 
the monks of Melrose held land at Halsingtun, in the Merse, of 
William de Alwentun for the twentieth part of the service 
of one knight, quando commune servicium exigetur per totum 
regnum Scocie? This indeed was scarcely more than a 
'recognition,' or acknowledgment of dependence; and it is 
not to be wondered at that the grant is said to be In liberam 
et puram elemosinam. From our Chartulary it will be seen 
that Earl David held his Scottish possessions of his brother, 



1 See Round's Feudal England, pp. 249, 251. 

2 Lib. S. Marie de Metros, i. p. 294. * The twentieth part of the service of 
one knight ' points to some form of scutage, or commutation of military service 
for a money-payment. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxv 

the king, for the service of ten knights. 1 But when Earl 
David made grants from these possessions to Lindores the sole 
reddendo consists of ' devout prayers.' Other benefactors are 
equally liberal, while in some cases military service due from 
the lands granted is expressly undertaken, so that the monas- 
tery of Lindores might be exempt. Thus the burden of 
hosting (onus exercitus) due from the lands of Eglesmagril 
was undertaken by Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, and this 
undertaking was confirmed by his son, Earl Robert. 2 Again, 
when Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale, gives Williams- 
town in exchange for second tithes, for which he was liable to 
the monastery, he frees that land ab exercitu, that is, he 
undertakes the military service due therefrom. And in the 
confirmation of the exchange granted by Alexander in., he 
implies by the words ' salvo servicio meo^ that the military 
service should be fulfilled. 3 A similar exchange was made by 
Henry de Hastinges ; and he adds with respect to the lands 
of Flandres, ' ab omnibus auxilio, exercitibus, et aliis omnimodis 
for'msecis serviciis adquietabimus." 1 4 Here also the king's con- 
firmation contains the words, ' salvo servicio nostro." 1 5 The 
land was conveyed ; the monks were exempted from the 
military service due from the land, which service, though 
still to be rendered to the king, was to be rendered by the 
superior, Henry de Hastinges. 6 

A charter (No. LV.) of William of Brechin, grandson of 
Earl David, is witnessed by David de Lochore, Michael de 
Munchur, and others, designated by the grantor as ' my 
knights.' It has been suggested, with what seems reasonable 
probability, that this form of expression was used of those 



1 No. i. a Nos. XLIL, XLIIL, XLIV. 

8 Nos. cxvi., cxvii. 4 No. cxvm. 5 No. cxix. 

6 It would be out of place to enter on the- discussion of the question disputed 
by feudalists as to the sense of se)-vitium forinsecum. There is no doubt that it 
applies to service outside those due to the immediate superior in cases of sub- 
infeudation, and ordinarily to service due to the king. Some would confine its 
application to expeditio, or \ho. foreign military service of the king. 



Ixxvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

who discharged the military service due from their lord's 
land. 1 In another of our charters (No. LXXXVI.), Constantine 
de Mortemer is described as 'Earl David, knight 1 ; and 
Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, styles Roger de Luuethot, ' my 
knight ' (No. xxvi.); expressions which are, presumably, to be 
interpreted in the same manner. 

THE PAPAL BULLS 

The bulls transcribed in our Chartulary are fifteen in 
number one of Celestine HI., two of Innocent in., one of 
Honorius in., three of Gregory ix., 2 and eight of Innocent iv. 
Only one of these is, in the language of diplomatics, a ' great 
bull' (No. xciv.). It is dated with all the formalities, and is 
fortified by the subscriptions of the Pope and of fourteen 
members of the College of Cardinals. 3 In the style of the 
Pontifical Chancery, the ' great bulls ' were commonly desig- 
nated Privilegla ; 4 and the Lindores scribe in his rubric 
entitles No. xciv. as 'Magnum privilegium Innocencii Tercij,' 
but it would be hazardous to assume that he used the word 
' privilegium ' in a technical sense, for the ' little bull, 1 No. 
XCHI., appears also as ' Magnum privilegium ' in the rubric. 

With the exception of the great bull of Innocent in. (No. 
xciv.) none of the bulls recorded in the Chartulary are noticed 
by Mr. Bliss in the Calendar of Papal Registers, and, pre- 
sumably, are not recorded in the extant Papal Regesta. Our 
Chartulary therefore affords material for supplying some of 
the deficiencies in the early archives of the Vatican. The great 
bull was printed by Baluze in 1682 in his Epistolae Innocentii 
Papae III., but without the subscriptions, and with the 
formulae indicated only by the opening words ; and (from the 



1 Lib. S. Marie de Melros, preface, p. xi, note. 

2 One of these is recited in a sentence of judges delegate, No. L. 

3 The ' little bulls ' are dated simply with the days of the month ' in the 
year of our pontificate.' 

4 See Giry's Manuel de Diplomatique, p. 688. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxvii 

text of Baluze) it was printed by Mr. Turnbull in his Liber 
Sancte Marie de Lundoris. 1 All the other bulls are (so far as 
the editor is aware) now printed for the first time. 

THE PRIVILEGES GRANTED BY THE POPES TO THE 
ABBEY OF LINDORES 

The papal privileges to Lindores follow the usual lines. 

1. The earliest charter connected with Lindores 2 shows that 
from the outset the monastery of Kelso, from which the first 
monks of Lindores appear to have been drawn, did not claim 
any jurisdiction over this daughter house. From the outset it 
was not a 4 cell ' of Kelso, but a wholly independent establish- 
ment. Celestine in. conferred on the monks the right to 
choose their own abbot on the death of the first abbot, Guido, 
and of each of his successors. So far as the evidence, as yet 
available, throws light on the subject, the direct appointment 
or ' provision,' as it was called, by the Pope to the office of 
abbot does not appear in the case of Lindores till the begin- 
ning of the sixteenth century, when (12th June 1502) Henry 
Orme was 'provided' by Alexander vi. Again, on Henry's 
resignation, John Philips was ' provided' (21st July 1523) by 
Pope Adrian vi. 3 But it is not improbable that, had we the 
evidence, it would be found that the system of direct appoint- 
ment by the Pope commenced, as in the case of several other 
Scottish monasteries, much earlier. Theiner's Monumenta 4 
supplies an example of Clement vi. setting aside an election 
made by the monks of Dunfermline, and ' providing' a nominee 
of his own as early as 1351. Dr. Brady's extracts from 
account-books and Consistorial Acts of the Roman Curia, pre- 
served in the libraries of Rome, Florence, Bologna, Ravenna, 



1 P. 39. There are few variants in the readings, and those of importance 
will be found noticed below, p. 265. 

2 Appendix I. 

3 W. M. Brady's Episcopal Succession, i. 197. 

4 No. 597. 



Ixxviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

and Paris, 1 are not continuous or complete, and do not com- 
mence till the year 1400 ; but they are sufficient to show that 
the system of ' provision ' by the Popes was largely prevalent 
in the case of the monasteries, as well as in the case of the 
bishoprics, in the fifteenth century. Thus we find ' provisions ' 
to Newbottle in 1422, to Deer in 1423, to Paisley in 1423, to 
Holyrood in 1424, to lona in 1426, to Dunfermline in 1427, 
to Inchaffray in 1429, to Kinloss in 1431, to Arbroath in 
1449, to Inchcolm in 1450. Other illustrations could be 
added, but these will suffice for our purpose. It is reasonable 
to conclude that the gradual processes by which the appoint- 
ments to the headships of the religious houses passed in 
practice from the chapters of the monasteries to the Pope 
followed the same lines which mark the transfer to the Pope 
of the appointment to bishoprics from the capitular bodies 
of the cathedrals. In the earlier period the chapters elected, 
and the Pope, as a rule, confirmed. At a later time, the Pope 
claimed to ' reserve ' the appointments to his own ' provision ' ; 
but ordinarily gave effect to the wishes of the chapters as 
manifested by de facto elections. 2 Lastly, appointments both 
to monasteries and bishoprics came to all intents and purposes 
to be mere nominations from Rome. 

2. Among the other privileges conferred on Lindores, in 
common with many other religious houses, was the exemption 
from paying tithes on the crops of fallow-lands (novalid) 3 which 
they had brought into cultivation either by the actual labour 
of the monks themselves or at their charges. Other lands 
would, as in other cases, pay tithes to the church of the parish 
in which they were situated. This exemption was a strong 
incentive to the advance of agriculture and the reclaiming of 
waste lands. 



1 The Episcopal Succession, etc. (Rome, 1876), i. 124-210. 

2 The Popes, when they claimed to have * reserved ' provisions to themselves, 
used to declare elections made by chapters to be dejure null and void. 

3 Pp. 104, 109. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxix 

A further privilege of importance was the exemption from 
tithe of all the cattle, sheep, horses, etc., of the monastery. 1 
There is no evidence to show that the monks of Lindores did 
much in the way of breeding cattle and sheep. The land in 
their neighbourhood did not afford such facilities for the 
pasturing great flocks of sheep as were enjoyed by the monks 
of Melrose ; but still the privilege granted was an appreciable 
gain to the monastery. 

The Chartulary presents us with an instance where the 
privilege now under consideration caused serious loss to those 
interested in the revenue from parochial tithes. The church 
of Muthill was a mensal church of the Bishop of Dunblane. 
When lands were granted to Lindores in that parish the 
flocks and herds on these lands were exempted from tithe, and 
the income of the bishop was diminished. How the matter 
was dealt with will be found in No. LIV. 

3. The right of the monastery to receive ad conversionem 
and retain, without the gainsaying of any, laymen or clerks 
who desired to leave the world and place themselves under 
monastic rule is, as usual, qualified by the provision that such 
persons should be freemen, or formally released from serfdom. 2 
From early times the Church, though it did much to mitigate 
the hardships of slavery, recognised the institution of slavery 
as not incompatible with the divine law. 3 The existence 
of serfdom in Scotland at the time (as witnessed to in No. 
LXXXIV.) shows that the limitation was no mere archaic survival 
of an unmeaning formula. 4 In Sir E. M. Thompson's recently 
issued volume The Customary of the Benedictine Monasteries 

1 The word nutrimenta, in mediaeval Latin, means the young of animals, those 
still sucking the dam, from which only the tithe was exacted, or as Ducange 
expresses it, ' Nutricatus animalium> ex quo decimae penduntur ecclesiis. ' 

2 P. 109. 

3 Pope Gelasius in a passage embodied by Gratian in the Decretum (i. dis- 
tinct, liv. cap. 12) lays down the principle ; and Gratian adds a reference to I Tim. 
vi. I, 2. 

4 Laymen admitted to a religious house and submitting themselves to the 
service of the monastery were commonly known as 'conversi.' 



Ixxx THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

of St. Augustine ', Canterbury, and St. Peter, Westminster^ we 
find the following questions (among others) put to novices: 
4 Si sint liberae condicionis, videlicet non serviles personae ? 
Si unquam fuerunt professi in arciori religione ista?' 2 

4. The brothers of the monastery, after having been formally 
professed, were forbidden to leave the house where their pro- 
fession was made without the formal sanction of the abbot, 
except in the case of their seeking to be admitted to an order 
subjected to a stricter rule than that to which they had pro- 
fessed obedience. 3 How early the exception here noted was 
recognised it is not easy to say, but before long it appears as 
part of the general Canon Law. 4 For a time it had been a 
special privilege of certain orders (among them the Templars 
and Hospitallers) that a professed member could not, against 
the will of his superiors, pass to any other order, even 
though of stricter rule ; but this privilege was abrogated 
by Gregory ix. 5 

5. The privilege of the permission granted to the monastery 
to celebrate divine offices during the time of a general inter- 
dict was very commonly granted to religious houses. The 
permission was qualified by the condition that the services 
should be said suppressa voce, with closed doors, and without 
the ringing of bells. Not many years before the foundation 
of Lindores the contest of King William with the Pope as to 
the appointment to the bishopric of St. Andrews had caused 
the whole kingdom of Scotland to be placed under interdict. 
The sentence was soon reversed; but its memory was fresh. 



Henry Bradshaw Society, 1902. 

P. 6. 

See the second of the questions put to novices at Canterbury. 

Decretals of Gregory ix. (lib. ill. tit. xxxj. cap. 18). 

The decretal letter embodied in the Canon Law, as cited in the preceding 
note, was written by Innocent in. (about 1212) on the occasion of a monk of 
the Benedictine monastery of Durham desiring to pass to the stricter rule of the 
Cistercians. Ultimately, such questions as which of two orders was bound by 
the stricter rule, and what were the motives of him who sought the change, were 
to be referred to the Apostolic See. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxxi 

The horrors of the better-known interdict of the whole 
kingdom of England, in the reign of John some fourteen years 
after the foundation of Lindores, revived the sense of the value 
of the privilege. 1 

6. It was assumed that for the performance of such religious 
offices as were confined to bishops the conferring of orders 
on such of the monks as were to be ordained, the consecrating 
of churches, the consecration of altars, the blessing of the 
chrism and holy oil the bishop of the diocese should be 
applied to ; but Lindores, in accordance with a very common 
privilege granted to monasteries, had the right to resort to 
any Catholic bishop in communion with the Apostolic See in 
the event of the bishop of the diocese attempting to bargain 
for such services. The diocesan bishop was expected to render 
such services sine pravitate? 

7. Another common privilege which Lindores possessed by 
grant from the Pope was the right to afford sepulture to any 
(not being excommunicated or under interdict) whose devotion 
prompted the wish to be buried in the monastery. This 
privilege was qualified by the condition that the rights to 
certain dues possessed by the parish church of the deceased 
should be respected. Beside the ' mortuary ' or 4 corse-present ' 
the best beast (preciosius animal), or, in the case of the very 
poor, the ' umaist claith ' (major pannus et meKor)f& pro- 
portion of the movable goods of the deceased, after the 
payment of debts and the provision for the widow and 
children, was assigned by custom and canon law to the church. 



1 The privilege as conferred on Lindores was the common form. The 
monastery of St. Augustine at Canterbury was specially honoured by Pope 
Celestine ill. in the permission 'celebrare cantus clarissime quando terra est 
interdicta.' See Dugdale's Monasticon, i. 145. 

2 Pp. 104, 109. The phrase sine pravitate was understood as equivalent to 
sine pravitate simoniaca. In the corresponding passage in a bull of Boniface 
viii., addressed to the monastery of St. Augustine at Canterbury, his words run, 
' gratis, et absque pravitate aliqua.' Dugdale's Monasticon^ i. 130. 

3 See the thirteenth century statutes on the subject in Concilia Scotiae, 
ii. 44, 47. 



Ixxxii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

It is to dues of this kind that reference is made in the Chartu- 
lary (No. LIV.), where an agreement is made with the monastery 
that the parish church of Muthill should receive from the 
seculars living on the lands of the monastery, in Fedale, Beny, 
and Concrag, ' obventiones debitas tarn pro vivis quam pro 
defunctis.' The Scottish Church of the thirteenth century 
dealt with the subject by statute. It was enacted that if the 
deceased had chosen a place of burial other than his parish 
church, the body should be first carried to the parish church 
(ad matricem ecclesiam), and, 4 when all dues had been there 
paid,' it should be borne to the place chosen. 1 

Among those who chose the abbey of Lindores for a place 
of burial were Henry of Brechin, the son of the founder, and 
his wife, Juliana, 2 and William Wascelyn and his wife, Mabel. 
The two latter expressly direct that, wheresoever within the 
realm of Scotland they might die, their bodies were to be 
brought for burial to the monastery of Lindores. 3 

The possession by any church of the right of sepulture 
carried with it a privilege of much importance. Such churches, 
as well as ' baptismal churches," that is, parish churches (for 
monasteries were as a rule forbidden to have a font) were 
allowed to afford temporary protection to certain classes of 
criminals fleeing there for safety. 4 

This important, though limited, right is not to be confounded 
with the enlarged and special privilege of 4 sanctuary ' possessed 
by such highly honoured places as Wedale, Lesmahago, Tor- 
phichen, and Innerleithen in the south, Dull in Atholl, and 
Applecross and Dornoch in the north, within whose ' girth "* 
the worst criminals had immunity. 



1 Concilia Scotiae, ii. 44. 2 No. LX. 

3 No. xxxvii. 

4 * Statuimus quod in qualibet ecclesia baptismali, vel in aliqua ubi sepultura 
est, tutum sit refugium unicuique cui conceditur de jure per triginta passus 
cimeterium in circuitu.' Concilia Scotiae, ii. 46. The classes of culprits 
excluded from full protection will be found described in another Scottish statute 
of the thirteenth century, at p. 18 of the same volume. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxxiii 

8. The papal prohibition of any one pronouncing against 
the monastery sentence of excommunication, suspension, or 
interdict, without evident and reasonable cause, cannot 
properly be styled a privilege ; but it would serve as a whole- 
some reminder to the bishop in whose diocese a monastery 
was situated to be wary and discreet in taking action of this 
kind. There is unhappily more than enough of evidence to 
show that the weapon of spiritual penalty, even to the extreme 
of excommunication, was at times used with little scruple 
against opponents. 1 

9. From a bull (not preserved in our Chartulary) of which a 
transcript was made by the scribe of the Lindores writs pre- 
served in the Advocates Library, and printed for the Abbotsford 
Club, 2 we learn that in March 1289 Pope Nicholas iv. granted 
to the monks of Lindores the privilege of wearing caps suitable 
to their order during divine service on the great festivals, and 
in processions, when they were according to custom vested in 
albs and silk copes, with the restriction that at the reading of 
the Gospel and the elevation of the Host in the Mass due 
reverence was to be observed. The monks had pleaded in the 
letter to which the indult of Nicholas was the response that 
some of the monks had suffered frequent and protracted ill- 
nesses from having their heads uncovered in the cold climate 
of Scotland. The monastery of Kelso, in a sense the mother- 
house of Lindores, had obtained (1257) this privilege more 
than thirty years previously. The monks of that house had 
represented that Kelso was ' in frigida zona regionis Scotiae, 1 

1 Treating of the thirteenth century in England, a competent authority, Mr. 
W. W. Capes, writes, ' Excommunications were always in the air. They passed 
to and fro between ecclesiastics in high places ; were expected even by Peckham 
[Archbishop of Canterbury] when he could not pay his debts ; they were flung 
broadcast at times like the curses of a scolding tongue ; were hurled even at a 
saint like Cantilupe [Bishop of Hereford], who died perhaps unabsolved ; were 
licensed even for a schoolmaster to curb unruly boys.' The English Church in 
the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries, p. 35. 

2 Liber S. Marie de Lundoris, p. 24. The scribe entitled the bull ' De bo- 
netis utendis bulla,' etc. But there seems to have been a distinction between the 
bonetum and the pikns as ecclesiastical headgear. See Dueange, s. v. Bonetum. 



Ixxxiv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

and that some of the brethren had died from the effects of the 
exposure of their heads to the cold. 1 The papal rescript in 
the case of Kelso did not specify any limitations on account of 
reverence in the use of the cap. But when, still earlier (1245), 
the privilege was granted to the monks of Dunfermline, the 
Elevation and the Gospel are, as in the case of Lindores, 
particularly mentioned as times when due reverence should 
be shown. 

The permission to wear caps during the celebration of Mass 
was regarded as a distinction and an honour; and, quite apart 
from considerations of health in a cold climate, and in large 
churches which were not artificially heated, was sought after 
as a mark of favour. It could be granted only by the Pope. 2 
The privilege was not due to the exceptional coldness of the 
climate of Scotland. The monks of Glastonbury obtained 
the indulgence in 1247, 3 those of Peterborough in 1249, 4 
and at about the same time the monks of St. Augustine's 
Canterbury. 5 

The fact is that as a token of the Pope's favour the 
permission to use the cap was eagerly sought. When one 
monastery had obtained this mark of distinction, others were 
unwilling to be lacking. It was just like the papal privilege, 
granted to certain abbots, of wearing the mitre and ring. 
When conferred on one house the jealousy of other houses was 
roused, and no efforts were spared to secure the honour. The 
abbot of Lindores does not appear to have ever been accorded 
the latter distinction. 6 

THE MILLS AND MULTURES OF THE ABBEY 

The somewhat singular survival to the present day of rights 
arising out of the ancient obligations connected with mills has 

1 Theiner, Vet. Mon. Hib. et Scot., p. 76. 

2 See Ferraris, Prompt a Bibliotheca, s.v. Pileolus. 

3 Dugdale's Monasticon, i. 41. (edit. 1846). 4 Ibid., i. 393. 5 Ibid., i. 146. 
6 It was enjoyed by the abbots of Kelso, Dunfermline, Cambuskenneth, 

Paisley, and Kynloss. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxxv 

served to make the subject of thirlage and multure more 
generally familiar in Scotland than many other topics of 
feudal law and usage. It will accordingly suffice to deal 
briefly with the matters brought before the reader in the 
Chartulary. 

In the mediaeval records of Scotland mills and the servitudes 
connected therewith make a frequent appearance. They were 
made the subject of legislation, and they formed a constant 
source of dispute and litigation. The possession of a mill 
was a valuable piece of property, because ordinarily the neigh- 
bouring vassals of the superior who possessed the mill were 
required to grind their corn at that mill, and to pay for the 
use of the mill amounts that commonly far exceeded the cost 
of the labour involved. The demands may often have been 
excessive, but it must be remembered that the cost of erecting 
the mill was considerable. These payments (ordinarily a pro- 
portion of the grain or the flour) were the 'multures. 1 Such 
vassals were compelled to attend, or (in technical language) to 
give ' suit ' (sectd) l to that mill, and, in the vernacular, were 
said to be ' thirled ' to it. 

In Earl David's foundation-charter there is a grant to the 
monastery of ' the mill of the vill of Lundores.' 2 There is 
also evidence in the charter that beside this mill there was 
another mill, which the earl refers to as 'my mill,' and it was 
stipulated that if the earl's mill could not grind, his corn was 
to be ground at the monks' mill, free of multure, and, similarly, 
if the monks' mill could not grind, they were to enjoy the right 
of grinding their corn free of multure at the earl's mill. The 
vill of Lindores was doubtless what came to be called 'old 
Lindores,' some two miles from the abbey ; and the mill was 



1 In a similar sense secta is used of the obligatory attendance of vassals at the 
courts of the superior, or of the king. 

2 This shows that the conjecture of Mr. Laing (Lindores Abbey % p. 59) is 
incorrect when he writes, ' There is every reason to believe that the monks were 
the first to introduce the grinding of corn by machinery into this neighbourhood.' 



Ixxxvi THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

probably in its neighbourhood at the Den of Lindores, from 
which the name of Denmylne was given to the old castle with 
which the name of Sir James Balfour, Lyon-King, antiquary 
and annalist, is associated. 1 The mill of the vill of Lindores 
had, as usual, lands astricted or thirled to it, and all the suit 
and multure of the mill was conveyed by the earl to the 
monastery. 

About half a century after the foundation of Lindores, the 
neighbouring priory of Cistercian nuns, which had been 
recently founded at Elcho, came into collision with Lindores 
on the subject of suit and multure which the abbot claimed 
from tenants of the nuns on their lands of Kynhard (Kinnaird), 
a couple of miles south-west of the abbey. For four and 
thirty years the nuns succeeded in preventing their tenants 
giving suit at the abbey mill. Probably litigation had gone 
on during some years, for at last we find this dispute between 
the two neighbouring religious houses was carried to the Pope. 
According to the not uncommon and sensible practice of the 
papal Curia, the Pope appointed an ecclesiastic in Scotland to 
try the question and give judgment. The abbot of Dunferm- 
line was named as judge delegate. It would seem that the 
prioress and other senior members of the convent had, during 
the course of the proceedings, been guilty of contumacy, possibly 
in disregarding the citation of the court. At any rate, ' for 
contumacy 1 the prioress and other ' majores personae 1 of the 
nuns were suspended by the judge delegate, armed with the 
authority of the Pope, from entrance to their church, and under 
this pressure they abruptly surrendered their whole case. The 
monks of Lindores had calculated the arrears of multure due 
from the tenants of Kinnaird for thirty-four years as amounting 
to a hundred and twenty marks sterling ; but it seems that the 
monks did not insist on the immediate payment of these, but 
were content with the formal agreement that so long as the 

1 He is Sir James Balfour ' of Denmylne and Kinnaird,' the latter property 
being the lands noticed below in the litigation as to multure. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxxvii 

niins of Elcho had no mill of their own, the tenants of Kinnaird 
should grind and pay their multure-dues at the abbot's mill ; 
and after the nuns had made a mill on their lands at Kinnaird, 
for which the abbot gave permission, they were to pay to the 
abbot three marks a year in lieu of multure. 

It is interesting to find that three hundred years later the 
arrangement seems to have held good, for in a rental of 
Lindores (of about 1580) we find Kinnaird still paying 'dry 
multure,' a term applied to multure-dues payable by those 
who had been relieved, in consideration therefor, of thirlage 
to the mill. 1 

This case points to what may reasonably be regarded as the 
true origin of * dry multures.' The learned Scottish feudalist 
of the sixteenth century, Sir Thomas Craig of Riccarton, in 
a rather off-hand manner attributes 'dry multures' (siccas 
multuras) to the grasping injustice (iniquitas) of the feudal 
superiors. 2 But there must have been some reasonable, or at 
least some plausible, plea for such an exaction ; and such a 
plea we find in the exemption of land, originally astricted 
to a particular mill, in return for a payment made, which 
payment was designated ' dry multure.' 

It is obvious that on the terms agreed to, the nuns of Elcho 
had but little inducement to go to the expense of building a 
mill at Kinnaird, for the yearly average of the multure for 
the thirty-four years was only a little over three and a half 
marks. 

The arrears of a hundred and twenty marks and the costs 
of litigation were held over the nuns in terrorem for the faithful 
fulfilment of the agreement. The monks may on the whole be 
regarded as having acted with generosity, for they had been com- 
pelled in defence of their rights to appeal to Rome ; and an 



1 The rental is printed by Laing, Lindores Abbey, pp. 418-427. 

2 ' Dominbr-um iniquitas, non his (scilicet multuris consuetis) contenta, etiam 
siccas multuras introduxit, quas etiam deberi volunt, sive apud domini molen- 
dinum grana molantur, sive non.' Jus Feudale, lib. ii. dieg. viii. cap. 6. 



Ixxxviii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

appeal to Rome was a costly proceeding. In the suit before the 
papal delegate they had indeed, in the usual form, claimed * ex- 
pensas in lite facias et de cetero faciendas? But, the agreement 
between the litigants being made before judgment was pro- 
nounced, the costs like the arrears were not to be demanded 
if the terms of the agreement were fulfilled. 

We possess so little material for the history of the Cister- 
cian nunnery at Elcho that any new light on the subject is to 
be welcomed. The instrument (No. cxxv.) with which we 
have been dealing is dated 25th January 1281-2 ; and the 
nuns 1 tenants at Kinnaird not having paid multure for thirty- 
four years is proof that the lands of Kinnaird had been 
granted to the nuns at least as early as 1258; but probably 
not earlier, for if multure had been paid from Kinnaird at an 
earlier date during its possession by the convent at Elcho, it 
is all but certain that the important fact would have been 
mentioned in the formal charge made against the nuns by the 
monastery of Lindores. 

The permission granted to the monks by Gocelin de Balliol 
(for the blench-duty of a pair of white gloves), for the forma- 
tion of a mill-lade, the exact measurement of which is pre- 
scribed, from the river Ury to the mill at Insch (Inchmabani), 
indicates that the abbey contemplated erecting a mill at that 
place. 1 

In the rental (about 1480), printed by Mr. Laing, 2 we find 
the following mills in the possession of Lindores and bringing 
in rents: (1) Williamstown (vilib. xiij s. ivd.); (2) Fintray 
(vij lib. vs. viijd.); (3) Leslie (xxvj s. viij d.) ; (4) Feddelis 
(viij lib.) ; (5) Eglesmagyrdill (viij lib. xiij s. iv d.) ; (6) Dene- 
mylne (liij s. iv d.) ; (7) Cregmylne (iiij chalders of victual). 

The last-named of these mills Craigmill 3 was the mill to 
which the burgesses of Newburgh were thirled ; and according 

1 No. CXXIII. 2 Lindores Abbey, pp. 410-418. 

3 The mill lay directly under Clatchard Craig, about half a mile from the 
Monastery. 



INTRODUCTION Ixxxix 

to the terms of their infeftment the multure paid by them 
was ' the sexteind corne of quheit, and the twenty-ane corne 
of here, malt, and mele.' 1 

Beside the payment of multure-dues there were services 
connected with the lord's mill to which vassals were commonly 
obliged. Among these was the carriage of the mill-stones, 
often from a considerable distance, when they had to be 
renewed. 2 Another service was the repairing of the mill-lade, 
mill-stank, and mill-dam. To works of this kind reference is 
made by William Wascelyn when he grants to Lindores that 
the monks and their ' men ' should be held quit or exempt of 
the ' work of the mill,' due from their land at Newtyle, 
though they were not freed of multure. 3 And an allusion to 
similar obligations seems to be made in the foundation 
charter 4 when Earl David granted the mill of Lindores to 
the monastery, ' ita ut homines meifaciant omnia que pertinent 
ad molendinum sicut solent facere tempore quo habui illud in 
manu mea? 

Sometimes in a grant of land to a monastery the mill was 
excluded. Thus, in the grant of the lands of Rathengothen 
made by Malise, brother of Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, the 
mill and the water of the stank of the mill are excepted ; but 
the monks and 'their men' were to enjoy the privilege of 
having their corn ground at the mill free of multure. 5 

Lastly, when a grant of land was made, if the clause cum 
multuris appeared in the writ of infeftment, the thirlage of 
such land was thereby extinguished. 6 An example of this 

1 See the Decreet Arbitral by Patrick Wellis, Provost of Perth and others in 
the dispute between the Abbot and Convent of Lindores and the Bailies, 
Council, and Community of Newburgh, 6th November 1501. Lindores Abbey, 
pp. 491-495. The decreet is in the charter-chest of Newburgh. 

2 ' Considering that there were few or no roads, the simplest arrangement 
was to thrust a beam or a young tree through the hole of the mill-stone and then 
for the whole multitude to wheel it along upon its edge an operation of some 
difficulty and danger in a rough district. ' Cosmo Innes, Scotch Legal 
Antiquities, p. 47. 

3 No. xxxvu. See also xxxix. 4 No. n. 5 No. xxix. 
6 See Erskine's Institute, Book n. tit. ix. 38. 



xc THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

will be found in the grant to Lindores, made (in excamb.} by 
King Robert de Brus. of the lands of Kynmuk, etc. 1 



THE MS. OF THE CHARTULARY OR REGISTER OF LINDORES, 

PRINTED IN THE, PRESENT VOLUME 

The manuscript from which the Latin text in this volume 
is transcribed has been long in the possession of the family of 
Cuninghame of Caprington. In February 1886 Mr. R. W. 
Cochran-Patrick, while on a visit to Caprington Castle, seems 
to have accidentally got sight of the little volume, and at once 
perceived the general character of its contents. By permis- 
sion of the owner it was transmitted to Dr. Thomas Dickson, 
then Curator of the Historical Department of H.M. General 
Register House, Edinburgh, who after a few days communi- 
cated to the Society of Scottish Antiquaries of Scotland 2 an 
account of the volume. The high value and importance of 
the discovery was at once established. 

4 The volume,' writes Dr. Dickson, 'consists of eighty-six leaves 
of vellum measuring seven and a half by five inches. Its ancient 
binding is now so dilapidated that only a part of one of the 
oak boards remains attached to it, and their leather covering 
has disappeared with the exception of a minute fragment, 
only sufficient to show that its colour was red ; still the stout 
leather bands and the strong sewing are unbroken, and the 
book remains firm and well-preserved. 3 The first twenty-six 
leaves form five unequal gatherings, from which eight or nine 
leaves have been cut away, apparently because they had been 
written upon, suggesting either that the volume was at first 
devoted to a different purpose, or that the first portion had 
once formed part of another book. The remainder of the 



1 No. cxxvi. 2 Proceedings, xx. 148, etc. 

3 When lately (1902) the little book was in the custody of the editor, for the 
preparation of the present volume, only one of the three leather bands remained 
intact. 



INTRODUCTION xci 

volume consists of five equal gatherings, each containing 
twelve leaves.' It may be added that the quality of the 
vellum of folios 29-88, containing the earlier script, is superior 
to that in the first part of the volume, lending some support 
to, or at least falling in with, the second suggestion of 
Dr. Dickson, that the first portion once formed part of 
another book. 1 

The earliest part of the manuscript, beginning at fol. 29, 
and running on to the middle of foL 74 verso, is (with the 
exception of a few places where later scribes have utilised 
blank spaces) written in a beautiful and uniform hand, which 
Dr. Dickson assigns to the middle of the thirteenth century. 
The lines (twenty-five to the page) have been carefully ruled. 
The initial letters appear ordinarily in red and blue or red 
and green alternately, though in a few instances the initial 
letter which had been left blank for colouring has not been 
supplied in colour. The titles are rubricated in this part ; but 
in the other parts of the volume they have in general been 
added (sometimes very carelessly and unintelligently) in the 
current script of a later date, and in ordinary ink of an inferior 
quality. 2 After fol. 74 verso the entries are by a large variety 
of hands, perhaps as many as fourteen or fifteen, varying much 
in character. A page of the earliest handwriting, and two 
pages from other parts (the latter two pages selected rather 
for their affording good subjects for the photographic camera 
than as representing the script of any large part of the 
manuscript) have, by permission of Colonel Cuninghame, been 
reproduced. 

What has been said may suffice for the general reader. 
Mr. Maitland Thomson, Curator of the Historical Depart- 
ment of H. M. General Register House, has been good enough 

1 The leaves have been numbered in ink in comparatively modern times, and 
that numbering has been followed, and is marked in the margin of the printed 

:xt. 

2 There are three exceptions : the titles of Nos. cxxxvr., cxxxvu., cxxxviii., 
are carefully rubricated. 



xcii THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

to furnish the editor with a fuller and more detailed description 
of the manuscript. This will be found in Appendix II. 

The question as to how the Chartulary of Lindores came 
into the possession of the Cuninghames of Caprington must 
be left to conjecture. Dr. Dickson observes, ' It is conjectured 
that it may have been acquired by Sir John Cuninghame when 
he was engaged, towards the end of the seventeenth century, 
in collecting the library which is still preserved at the family 
seat, or, with more probability perhaps, it may have come 
nearly a century earlier, through the marriage of John 
Cuninghame of Brownhill, father of the above-mentioned 
Sir John, with Janet, fourth daughter of Patrick Leslie, 
commendator of the abbey and first Lord Lindores. 1 It may 
be remarked that Sir John Cuninghame is known to have 
been much interested in antiquarian pursuits. 

In a blank space on the verso of fol. 62 there is written 
in what may be sixteenth or seventeenth century hands, 
'lacobus fairful,' and beneath this, 'IHOM KILgoure. 1 
Possibly these names may be found to afford some hint as to 
the story of the ownership of the book, or of the hands 
through which it passed. 

The text of the Chartulary has been transcribed for the 
Scottish History Society by the competent and experienced 
charter-scholar, the Rev. Walter Macleod. In cases of doubt 
I have tested the transcript with the original, and have 
occasionally availed myself of the aid generously afforded by 
expert charter-scholars. The writ entitled 'Dauid Comes 
de Hunthyngton' (CXLIX.) presented special difficulties; and 
much labour has been expended by the editor in producing 
a transcript as exact as possible. 

The punctuation is wholly editorial. To have been content 
with attempting to reproduce the scanty, irregular, and often 
highly capricious use of the medial point would have seriously 
embarrassed the great majority of readers. Nor could I 
approve of the total omission of all punctuation, as adopted 



INTRODUCTION xciii 

in the edition of the Chartulary of the Church of St. Nicholas, 
Aberdeen, recently issued by the New Spalding Club. The 
employment of capitals, though also to some extent capricious, 
will not mislead, and the use of the original has in this respect 
been retained. Readings which were doubtful either because 
of uncertainty as to the word intended by the scribe, or 
because of the obscurity of the sense, have been marked with 
an obelus (f). When any alteration of the text has been 
made the original is indicated in the margin, or, in the case of 
additions, by square brackets. The spelling of the original 
has been retained, except in a few cases noted in the margin. 

THE ABBOTSFORD CLUB'S (SO-CALLED) Chartulary of Lindores. 

In 1841 the Abbotsford Club issued to its members a volume 
under the editorship of Mr. W. B. D; D. Turnbull, bearing as 
title The Chartularies of Balmerino and Lindores, now first 
printed from the original MSS. in the Library of the Faculty 
of Advocates. Confining ourselves to the part of the volume 
relating to Lindores, which appears with separate pagination 
and a separate title-page (inscribed Liber Sancte Marie de 
Lundoris), it may be observed that the manuscript in the 
Advocates'* Library from which it is transcribed has no just 
claim to be called the ' Chartulary of Lindores,' being merely, 
as Dr. Dickson has pointed out, ' a transcript, made apparently 
so late as the time of James iv., of twenty-five documents 
relating to the abbey and its burgh, ranging in date from the 
end of the twelfth century to the beginning of the sixteenth, 
and selected without any appearance of method.' 1 Three of 
these documents are records of obligations to various Scottish 
merchants in 1502 for money transmitted abroad. Of these 
more will be said hereafter. 2 As regards the others, if one 
may venture on conjecture, it would seem that the interests of 



1 Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, xx. 149. 

2 See pp. 297, 298. 



xciv THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

the person who made the transcripts, or for whom they were 
made, were mainly occupied with the possessions and rights of 
the abbey in its own immediate neighbourhood, or in parts 
not very remote. Four relate to Newburgh, six to the neigh- 
bouring fisheries, the quarry, the grange, and the woods of 
Lindores, two to the internal arrangements of the monastery, 
and seven to Dundee and its church and neighbourhood. 
With the exception of a grant of libera foresta in the woods 
of Fintray, and of a toft in the burgh of Aberdeen, no notice 
is taken of the extensive rights and possessions of the abbey 
in Aberdeenshire. Nor is there any reference to the churches 
of the abbey in the diocese of Lincoln. The foundation charter 
is not transcribed. Some of the charters copied appear also 
in our Chartulary. Abstracts of those which do not so appear 
will be found in Appendix III. 

THE CUNINGHAME CHARTULARY AN INCOMPLETE REGISTER OF 
WRITS CONNECTED WITH LlNDORES 

Not only have we evidence from the Abbotsford Club book 
that the record of writs in our Chartulary is not complete, but 
from other sources we find that there were several writs (some of 
them of much importance) which one might naturally expect to 
find in such a register, but which are absent from our manuscript. 
Thus in the Registrum Aberdonense 1 there is entered a bull of 
Pope Alexander iv., dated 13th September 1257, addressed to 
the abbot and convent of Lindores, and bearing on the income 
of the monastery derivable from their churches in the Garioch. 
Again (as we find in the same register) 2 two years later (1st 
August 1259) a deed of agreement was drawn up between the 
Bishop of Aberdeen and the abbot and convent of Lindores 
as to the boundaries of certain lands in Aberdeenshire, 
which, contrary to what one might expect, is lacking in 
our Chartulary. Other later writs (including an important 

1 Vol. i. pp. 23-26. 2 Pp. 26-27. 



INTRODUCTION xcv 

mandate of King Robert n.) will be found calendared in 
Appendix III. 

It is plain that if the convent followed the usual practice of 
registering important deeds relating to rights, privileges, and 
property, the recently discovered volume must have been 
supplemented by one or more other books. It is perhaps too 
much to hope that another volume may yet be rescued from 
some obscure hiding-place ; but it is well that the attention of 
antiquaries should be drawn to the probability that at least 
one other volume of the register once existed. 

The latest writ entered in our register by the scribe who 
wrote the earlier portions of the manuscript (ff. 29-74 verso), 
with the exception of a few writs entered on blank spaces by 
later hands, is dated in July 1253. 1 The bull of Alexander iv. 
>ferred to above as preserved in Registrum Aberdonense is dated 
in September 1257. One cannot but suspect that between 
these two dates the whole of the earliest part was transcribed, 

other words, that it was transcribed at a time when the 
mils of Innocent iv. 2 were the latest bulls in the possession of 
;he monastery. This conjecture falls in sufficiently well with 
the judgment of Dr. Dick son, based on palaeographical con- 
siderations, that the earliest portion was written 4 about 1260.' 

The dull details connected with the succession of the abbots, 
together with some few historical notices of the abbey, have 
jen relegated to Appendix IV. 

J. D. 



1 No. LXXXIV. 2 Nos. xcix., cvi. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

I 
Carta Comitis Dauid de Rege Willelmo. 

W. DEI gracia Rex Scottorum Episcopis, Abbatibus, Comitibus, {fol. 29.] 
Baronibus, Justiciariis, vicecomitibus, prepositis, ministris, et 
omnibus probis hominibus tocius terre sue clericis et laicis, 
salutem. Sciant presentes et futuri me Dedisse et concessisse et 
hac carta mea confirmasse Dauid fratri meo comitatum de 
Leuenaus cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, et Lundors et Dunde, 
et forgrund et petmothel, et Neutyle, et fintreth, et Rothiod, 
et Inuerurin, et Munkegyn, et Boverdyn, et Durnach, et 
Uuen et Arduuen, et Garuiach, et Mertonam que est in 
Laudonia iuxta castellum puellarum. Volo itaque et precipio 
ut predictus Dauid frater meus et heredes sui de me et heredi- 
bus meis in feudo et hereditate teneant et possideant omnes 
terras istas prenominatas per Rectas Diuisas suas quas 
habuerunt quando illas ei dedi, et cum omnibus iustis per- 
tinenciis suis in bosco et piano, In terris et aquis, In pratis 
et pascuis, In molendinis et stangnis, In moris et Maresiis, 
In viis et semitis, et omnibus aliis iustis pertinenciis suis tarn 
non nominatis, quam nominatis; cum sacca et socca, cum 
tol et Tern, et Infangenthefe, bene et plenarie et honorifice, 
et ita libere et quiete in omnibus sicut ego ipse unquam terras 
illas tenui et possedi, faciendo inde mihi et heredibus meis 
seruicium Decem militum. Testibus H. episcopo Sancti Andree; 
Jocelino episcopo Glasguensi ; M. episcopo de Aberden ; S. 
episcopo Morauiensi ; A. episcopo Catenensi ; Comite Dun- 
cano ; Comite Gileberto ; Comite Waldevo ; Malcolmo Comite 
Ethol ; G. comite de anegus ; Comite colbano ; Ricardo de 
Moreuille, | Constabulario; Roberto deQuincy; Waltero Olifer ; [f i, 29, 
Alano filio Walteri Senescalli ; Willelmo De Haya ; Radolpho 



2 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

de Vere; Ricardo de Munfichet; Willelmo de Lindesey; 
Malcolmo filio comitis Duncani; Patricio filio comitis Waldevi; 
Willelmo filio Ricardi de Moreuille; Rand, de Solis. apud 
Perth. 

' CHARTER of EARL DAVID from KING WILLIAM.' 

W[ILLIAM] by the grace of God King of Scots to the bishops, abbots, 
earls, barons, justiciars, sheriffs, provosts, officers, and all good men 
of his whole land, clerical and lay, greeting. Let those present and to 
come know that I have given and granted, and by this my charter have 
confirmed, to David, my brother, the Earldom of Lennox with all its 
pertinents, and Lundors, and Dundee, and Forgrund, and Petmothel, 
and Neutyle, and Fintreth, and Rothiod, and Inverurin, and Munkegyn, 
and Boverdyn, and Durnach, and Vuen, and Arduuen, and Garviach, 
and Merton, which is in Lothian near the Castle of Maidens. I will, 
therefore, and command that my brother David aforesaid and his heirs 
should hold and possess, in fee and heritage, of me and my heirs all those 
aforenamed lands, by their right marches, which they had when I gave 
them to him, and with all their just pertinents in wood and plain, in 
lands and waters, in meadows and pastures, in mills and stanks, in 
moors and marshes, in roads and paths, and all other their just per- 
tinents both named and unnamed, with sac and soc, with thol and them, 
and infangthef, well and fully and honourably, and as free and exempt 
in all things as I myself ever held and possessed those lands, by ren- 
dering to me and my heirs the service of ten knights. Witnesses, 
H[ugh], Bishop of St. Andrews ; Jocelin, Bishop of Glasgow ; M[atthew], 
Bishop of Aberdeen ; S[imeon], Bishop of Moray ; A[ndrew], Bishop of 
Caithness ; Earl Duncan ; Earl Gilbert ; Earl Waldeve ; Malcolm, Earl 
of Atholl ; G. Earl of Angus ; Earl Colban ; Richard de Moreville, 
Constable ; Robert de Quincy ; Walter Olifer ; Alan, son of Walter 
Steward (senescalli) ; William de Haya ; Ralph de Vere ; Richard de 
Munfichet ; William de Lindesay ; Malcolm, son of Earl Duncan ; 
Patrick, son of Earl Waldeve ; William, son of Richard de Moreville ; 
Randolph de Solis. At Perth. 

II 

Magna Carta Comitis Dauid de fundacione 
Monasterij. 

VNIVERSIS Sancte Matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus tarn pre- 
sentibus quam futuris Comes Dauid frater Regis Scottorum, 
Salutem. Sciatis me fundasse quandam Abbaciam apud 
Lundors de ordine Kelkoensi, ad honorem Dei et Sancte Marie 
et Sancti Andree et omnium sanctorum, pro salute anime 



FOUNDATION CHARTER 3 

Dauid Regis aui mei, et pro salute anime comitis Henrici 
patris mei, et comitisse Ade matris mee, et Malcolmi Regis 
fratris mei, et pro salute anime Regis Willelmi fratris mei et 
Regine Ermegard, et omnium antecessorum meorum, et pro 
salute anime mee et Matilde comitisse sponse mee, et pro 
salute anime Dauid, filii mei, et omnium successorum meorum, 
et pro salute animarum fratrum et sororum mearum. Dedi 
eciam et concessi et hac presenti carta mea confirm aui predicte 
abbacie de Lundors. et monachis ibidem Deo seruientibus, in 
liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ecclesiam de 
Lundors cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis, et terram ad 
predictam ecclesiam pertinentem per rectas diuisas suas in 
bosco et piano, sicut magister Thomas eandem terram tenuit et 
habuit. Preterea dedi eis omnem terram ab occidental! parte 
riuuli descendentis de magno lacu usque in they, et totam 
insulam que vocatur Redinche, preter vnam piscariam meam, 
scilicet vnam Jharam : Boues autem mei et vacce mee proprie | 
de Lundors utentur pastura dicte insule. Dedi eciam eis 
molendinum predicte uille de Lundors cum omni secta sua et 
multura, ita ut homines mei faciant omnia que pertinent ad 
molendinum sicut solent facere tempore quo habui illud in 
manu mea. Si autem molendinum meum non potuerit molere, 
molam proprium bladum meum ad molendinum eorum sine 
mulctura. Et si molendinum monachorum non potuerit 
molere, ipsi molent proprium bladum suum ad molendinum 
meum sine multura. Concedo eciam eis ecclesiam de Dunde 
cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis, et vnum toftum in burgo 
meo de Dunde liberum et quietum ab omni seruicio et auxilio, 
et consuetudine et exaccione ; Et ultra muneth fmtreth per 
rectas diuisas suas cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, et ecclesiam 
eiusdem uille cum pertinenciis suis omnibus ; Et in Garuiach 
lethgauel et malind cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, et per rectas 
diuisas suas. Concedo eciam eis ecclesiam de Inueruri cum 
capella de Munkegin et cum omnibus aliis pertinenciis suis, et 
ecclesiam de Durnach. et ecclesiam de Pramet et ecclesiam de 
Rathmuriel, et ecclesiam de Inchemabanin, et ecclesiam de 
Culsamuel et ecclesiam de Kelalcmond cum capellis earundem 
ecclesiarum et terris et decimis et omnibus earum pertinenciis, 

Iproprios vsus et sustentaciones eorundem monachorum. Con- 



4 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

cedo eciam eis totam terrain meam de Perth que uocatur 
insula cum omni plenitudine sua, et libertatibus suis sicut earn 
plenius et melius tenui et habui, et vnum plenum toftum infra 
uillam de Perth, quod euerardus flandrensis de me tenuit, 
tenendum sibi in libero | burgagio liberum et quietum sicut 
illud liberius et quiecius tenui et habui. Concede eciam eis 

[fol. 30, vnam carrucatam terre in uilla de Neutile quam a da filia mea, 
uxor malisij filij comitis fertheth eis dedit, tenendam sibi in 
Hberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, Ita libere, 
quiete, plenarie et honorifice, sicut carta predicte filie mee ade 
testatur. Concede eciam eis vnum plenarium toftum in burgo 
meo de Inuerurin liberum et quietum ab omni seruicio et 
auxilio, et consuetudine, et exaccione. Concedo eciam eis 
decimam omnium lucrorum et placitorum meorum infra terrain 
meam et extra ultra moneth quam habui tempore quo feci 
donacionem istam ; et decimam omnium lucrorum meorum 
que mihi proueniunt de lucris Domini Regis fratris mei, in toto 
regno suo ; et decimam omnium rerum mearum et heredum 
meorum ultra moneth, scilicet decimacionem Bladi et farine, 
Butiri et casei, carnis et venacionis, cibi et potus, coriorum 
ferarum cum mota canum captarum, Cere et salis, vncci et 
sepi, et omnium aliarum rerum que decimari possunt, et que 
dabuntur uel uendentur uel ad firmam ponentur de maneriis 
meis ultra moneth, uel eciam que in eis expendentur, scilicet 
in maneriis meis et terris quas habui tempore quo feci dona- 
cionem istam. Quare uolo et concedo ut predicta ecclesia de 
Lundors, et monachi ibidem Deo seruientes, habeant etteneant 
in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, de me et 
heredibus meis, prenominatas terras, ita libere, quiete, plenarie, 
et honorifice, sicut ego eas unquam liberius, quiecius, plenius, 

[fol. 31.] et honorificencius | tenui et habui. Concedo eciam eis curiam 
suam omnino liberam et dignitatem pacis, et omnes alias liber- 
tates quas abbacia habere debetur. Volo eciam et concedo ut 
predicti monachi habeant et teneant predictas terras et 
ecclesias, cum capellis et terris et decimis et omnibus aliis 
pertinenciis suis, in bosco, et piano, In pratis et pascuis, in 
aquis et molendinis, in stangnis et uiuariis et piscariis, In 
uiis et semitis, cum omnibus libertatibus et liberis consuetu- 
dinibus sine omni seruicio et consuetudine, et auxilio seculari, 



FOUNDATION CHARTER 5 

et exaccione, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
bene et in pace, libere, quiete, plenarie, integre et honorifice, 
sicut aliqua abbacia uel domus religionis in toto regno Scocie, 
melius, liberius, quiecius, plenius, et honorificencius, aliquam 
elemosinam habet et possidet. Haec autem bmnia prenomi- 
nato monasterio de Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruienti- 
bus ita libere et pacifice iure perpetuo possidenda confirmaui, 
ut michi succedencium nullus aliquid ab eis nisi solas oraciones 
ad anime salutem exigere presumat. Hiis testibus, Willelmo 
Rege Scottorum, Rogero episcopo Sancti Andree, Jocelino 
episcopo Glasguensi, Johanne episcopo Dunkeldensi, Matheo 
episcopo Aberdonensi, Hugone cancellario Regis, Dunecano 
Comite de fyfe, Comite patricio, Gilberto comite de Strathern, 
Roberto de Lundors,f Malcolmo filio Comitis Duncani, Seier de 
quinci, Philippe de Valuniis, Willelmo de Lindesey, Willelmo 
Cumyn, Dauid de Lindeseie, Waltero Olifer, Walkelino 
filio Stephani, Willelmo Wacelin, Roberto Basset, Henrico filio 
comitis, Ricardo capellano comitis. 



' EARL DAVID'S GREAT CHARTER of the FOUNDATION of the MONASTERY.' 

To all the sons of Holy Mother Church and to the faithful, as well 
present as to come. Earl David, brother of the King of Scots, greeting. 
Know ye N that I have founded an abbey at Lundors, of the order of Kelko, 
to the honour of God and of St. Mary and of St. Andrew and of All 
Saints, for the weal of the soul of King David, my grandfather, and for 
the weal of the soul of Earl Henry, my father, and of Countess Ada, my 
mother, and of King Malcolm, my brother, and for the weal of the soul 
of King William, my brother, and of Queen Ermegard, and of all my 
ancestors, and for the weal of my soul, and of Countess Matilda, my 
spouse, and for the weal of the soul of David, my son, and of all my 
successors, and for the weal of the souls of my brothers and sisters. 

I have also given and granted, and by this my present charter have 
confirmed to the aforesaid Abbey of Luudors, and to the monks there 
serving God, in free and pure and perpetual alms, the church of Lundors, 

ith all its just pertinents, and the land pertaining to the said church 
by its right marches, in wood and plain, even as Master Thomas had 
and held the same land. Moreover, I have given to them all the land 
on the west of the burn (rivulus) flowing from the great lake as far as 
the Tay, and the whole of the island which is called Redinche, saving 
one fishing of mine, to wit, one yare. But my own oxen and kine at 
Lundors shall use the pasture of the said island. I have also given to 






6 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

them the mill of the aforesaid vill of Lundors, with all its suit (sectu) 
and multure, so that my tenants shall do all things that pertain to the 
mill as they were accustomed to do when I had it in my possession. 
But if my mill shall not be able to grind,, I shall grind my own grain at 
their mill without multure. And if the mill of the monks shall not be 
able to grind, they shall grind their own grain at my mill without 
multure. 

I also grant to them the church of Dundee with all its just pertinents, 
and a toft in my burgh of Dundee, free and discharged of all service, aid, 
custom, and exaction : and beyond the Mounth, Fintreth by its right 
marches, with all its pertinents: and in Garviach, Lethgavel, and Malind, 
with all their pertinents, and by their right marches. I also grant to 
them the church of Inveruri, with the chapel of Munkegyn and all its 
other pertinents : and the church of Pramet, and the church of Rath- 
muriel, and the church of Inchmabanin, and the church of Culsamuel, 
and the church of Kelalcmond, with the chapels of the same churches, 
with their lands, teinds, and all pertinents, for their own uses and for 
the maintenance of the same monks. 

I also grant to them the whole of my land at Perth which is called the 
Island [Inch] with all its full liberties, as fully and completely as I had 
and held it ; and a full toft within the town of Perth, which Everard 
Fleming (flandrensis) l held of me, to be held by them in free burgage, 
as free and discharged of service as when I had and held it. 

I grant also to them one ploughgate of land in the vill of Newtyle, 
which Ada, my daughter, wife of Malise, son of Earl Fertheth, gave to 
them, to be held by them in free, pure, and perpetual alms, as freely, 
quietly, 2 fully, and honourably as the charter of my daughter, Ada, 
aforesaid, testifies. I likewise grant to them one full toft in my burgh 
of Inverurin, free and discharged of all service, aid, custom, and exaction. 

I also grant to them the tithe of all gains and of my pleas both within 
and without my lands beyond the Mounth, which I had at the time when 
I made this gift ; and the tithe of all gains which come to me from the 
gains of my brother, the king, in his whole realm ; and the tithe of all 
the property of me and my heirs beyond the Mounth, namely the tithes 
of grain and meal, of butter and cheese, of flesh and venison, of food and 
drink, of the skins of the animals of the chase caught by packs of 
hounds, of wax and salt, of fat and tallow, and of all other things 
which can be tithed and which shall be given, or sold, or granted for 
a rent out of my manors beyond the Mounth, or even which shall 
be expended in my manors and lands which I had at the time when I 
made that gift. 

Wherefore I will and grant that the aforesaid church of Lundors and 



1 Perhaps, ' the Fleming. ' 

2 The word quiete, frequently used in this connection in the Charters, might 
be better rendered by ' quitly ' or ' exemptly, ' if such words were tolerable. 



GRANTS BY EARL DAVID 7 

the monks there serving God shall have and hold of me and my heirs, in 
free, pure, and perpetual alms, the lands aforenamed, as freely, quietly, 
fully, and honourably as I ever had and held them most freely, quietly, 
fully, and honourably. 

I also grant to them their court wholly free, and the dignity of the 
peace, and all other liberties which an abbey ought to have. I will also 
and grant that the aforesaid monks should have and hold the aforesaid 
lands and the churches with their chapels, lands, tithes, and all other 
pertinents, in wood and plain, in meadows and pastures, in waters and 
mills, in stanks and live-pools (vivariis) and fisheries, in roads and paths, 
with all liberties and free customs, without any service, custom, secular 
aid, and exaction, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, well and in peace, 
freely, quietly, fully, perfectly, and honourably as any abbey or religious 
house in the whole realm of Scotland, most completely, freely, quietly, 
fully, and honourably has and possesses any alms. I have confirmed 
that all these shall be possessed by the aforesaid monastery of Lundors 
and the monks serving God there so freely and peaceably and of per- 
petual right, that none of my successors may presume to exact anything 
from them save only prayers for the weal of the soul. Witnesses, 
William, King of Scots ; Roger, Bishop of St. Andrews ; Jocelin, Bishop 
of Glasgow ; John, Bishop of Dunkeld ; Matthew, Bishop of Aberdeen ; 
Hugh, the King's Chancellor ; Duncan, Earl of Fife ; Earl Patrick ; 
Gilbert, Earl of Strathern ; Robert of London ; Malcolm, son of Earl 
Duncan ; Seir de Quincy ; Philip de Valoniis ; William de Lindesay ; 
William Cumyn ; David de Lindesay ; Walter Olifer ; Walkelin, son of 
Stephen ; William Wacelin ; Robert Basset ; Henry, son of the Earl ; 
Richard, chaplain of the Earl. 



Ill 

Carta Comitis Dauid de Ecclesiis de Lundors, 
de Dunde, et de Garuiach. | 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus tarn pre- CM **. 
sentibus quam futuris Comes Dauid frater Regis Scottorum, 
Salutem. Sciatis me fundasse quandam abbaciam apud 
Lundors de ordine Kelkoensi ad honorem dei et sancte marie 
virginis, et Sancti Andree apostoli, omnium que sanctorum, 
pro salute anime Regis aui mei et pro salute anime Comitis 
Henrici patris mei, et comitisse Ade matris mee, et Malcolmi 
Regis fratris mei, et pro salute anime Regis Willelmi fratris 
mei, et Regine Armengard, et omnium antecessorum meorum, 
et pro salute anime mee et Matildis comitisse sponse mee, et 



8 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

pro salute anime Dauid filij mei, et omnium successorum 
meorum, et pro salute animarum fratrum et sororum mearum. 
Concessi eciam et hac carta mea confirmaui predicte abbacie 
de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus in liberam 
et puram et perpetuam elemosinam ecclesiam de Lundors cum 
omnibus pertinenciis suis, et terram ad eandem ecclesiam 
pertinentem in bosco et piano sicut earn magister Thomas 
tenuit et habuit; et ecclesiam de Dunde cum omnibus per- 
tinenciis suis; et ecclesiam de fintreth cum omnibus pertinenciis 
suis, et ecclesiam de Inuerurin cum capella de Munkegyn, et 
cum omnibus aliis pertinenciis suis ; et ecclesiam de Durnach ; 
et ecclesiam de prameth ; et ecclesiam de Rathmuliel ; et 
ecclesiam de Inchemabanin ; et ecclesiam de Culsamuel ; et 
ecclesiam de Kelalcmund cum capellis earundem ecclesiarum, 
et terris et decimis et omnibus aliis pertinenciis earum ad 
proprios usus, et sustentaciones eorundem monachorum. Quare 
uolo et concede ut predicti monachi habeant et teneant in 
liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam predictas ecclesias 
[/of. 3?.] cum capellis, | terris, et decimis, et omnibus aliis pertinenciis 
suis, sine omni seruicio et consuetudine, et auxilio seculari et 
exactione, bene et in pace, libere, quiete, plenarie, integre, et 
honorifice, sicut aliqua abbacia uel domus religionis in toto 
regno Scocie melius, liberius, quiecius, plenarius, et honorifi- 
cencius aliquas ecclesias, uel aliquas alias elemosinas habet et 
possidet. Has autem ecclesias prenominato monasterio de 
Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus ita libere et 
pacifice iure perpetuo possidendas concessi et confirmaui, vt 
mihi succedencium nullus aliquid ab eis nisi solas oraciones 
ad anime salutem exigere presumat. Hiis testibus ; Willelmo 
Rege Scocie, Johanne episcopo Aberdonensi, Radulfo episcopo 
Brechinensi, Osberto abbate Kelchoensi, Henrico abbate 
de Aberbrodoc, Simone archidiacono de Aberdeen, Roberto 
decano de Aberdeen, Waltero officiali, Matheo de Aberdoen 
clerico domini Regis, Dauid de Lindesei, Waltero Olifer, 
Wiilkelino filio Stephani, Willelmo Wascelin, Roberto 
Basset, Galfrido de Wateruile, Normanno filio Malcolmi, 
Henrico de Beyuile, Matheo falconario, Simone flammang, 
cum multis aliis. 



GRANTS BY EARL DAVID 9 

(Abstract) 

( CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning 1 the CHURCHES of LUNDORS, 
DUNDEE, and GARVIACH.' 

EARL DAVID, brother of the King of Scots, to all the sons of Holy 
Mother Church . . . greeting. Know ye that I have founded an abbey 
at Lundors of the order of Kelko, to the honour of God, and of St. Mary 
the Virgin, and of St. Andrew the Apostle, and of All Saints, for the 
weal of the soul of the king, my grandfather, and ... I have given 
and by this my charter have confirmed to the aforesaid abbey of Lundors 
and the monks serving God there, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, 
the church of Lundors with all its pertinents, and the land pertaining to 
the same church in wood and plain, as Master Thomas held and had it. 
and the church of Dundee . . . and the church of Flntreth, and the 
church of Inverurin, with the chapel of Morikegyn . . . and the church 
of Durnach, and the church of Prameth, and the church of Rathmuliel, 
and the church of Inchmabanin, and the church of Culsamuel, and the 
church of Kelalcmuud, with the chapels of the same churches, and the 
lands, tithes, and all other their pertinents, for their own uses (ad proprios 
usus) and the maintenance of the same monks. Wherefore I will and 
grant that the monks aforesaid should have and hold the aforesaid 
churches, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, with their chapels, lands, 
and all other pertinents, free from all service, custom, secular aid, and 
exaction, well and in peace ... so that none of my successors may 
presume to exact anything from them, save only prayers for the weal of 
the soul. Witnesses : William, King of Scotland. . . 

IV 

Carta Comitis Dauid de terris ecclesiarum de 
Garuiach. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris comes Dauid frater 
Regis Scottorum, salutem. Sciatis me dedisse, concessisse, et 
hac carta mea confirmasse deo et abbacie mee de Lundors 
omnes ecclesias que fuerunt in donacione mea in Scocia cum 
capellis et decimis et terris ad ipsas pertinentibus, per illas 
diuisas quas habuerunt quando feci mensurare terram de 
Garuiach; et cum hominibus manentibus in ipsis terris, et 
eorum sequela ; et ut habeant omnes libertates in terris meis 
quas alii habent in Regno Scocie manentes in terris aliarum 
ecclesiarum. Quare uolo et firmiter precipio ut nullus 
successorum meorum aliquod grauamen uel molestiam faciat 



10 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

predicte abbacie contra hanc meam concessionem. Hiis 
testibus, Dauid de Lindeseie, Walkelino filio Stephani, 
Willelmo Wascelyn, Roberto Basset, Roberto filio Robert!, 
Willelmo et Dauid capellanis, Walkelino de Nuers, Gilberto 
Dolepain, Roberto filio Martini, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

{ CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning the LANDS of the CHURCHES of 
GARVIACH.' 

To all who shall see or hear this writ Earl David, brother of the King 
of Scots, greeting. Know ye that I have given, granted, and by this 
my charter confirmed to God and my abbey of Lundors all the churches 
which were in my gift in Scotland, with the chapels, tithes, and lands 
to them pertaining, by those marches which they had when I caused the 
land of Garviach to be measured ; together with the men and their 
families {eorum sequela) residing on those lands ; and that they should 
possess all the liberties on my lands which others residing on the lands 
of other churches in the realm of Scotland possess. Wherefore I will 
and strictly command that none of my successors cause any grievance or 
trouble to the aforesaid abbey contrary to my grant. Witnesses . . . 



Carta Comitis Dauid de Culsamuel et Munkegin. 

SCIANT presentes et futuri quod Ego comes Dauid, frater Regis 
Scocie, dedi et concessi et hac present! carta mea confirmaui 
deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus pro salute anime mee, et 
uxoris mee, et antecessorum et successorum meorum omne ius 
quod habui in culsamuel et in Munkegyn, saluo cano quod 
pertinet ad episcopum Sancti Andree, scilicet, vj. solidos et 
vj. denarios, de culsamuel ; et iiij. solidos et iiij. denarios de 
Munkegyn, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam. 
Concedo eciam eis curiam suam liberam et quietam de 
hominibus suis qui manent in terris ecclesiarum suarum. 
Preterea concedo eis ut homines sui proprij quieti sint ab omni 
tolneio et consuetudine seculari. Nolo autem quod predict! 
monachi aliquem firmariorum meorum uel hominum super 
terras suas recipiant. Quare uolo ut prefati monachi predicta 
teneant et possideant ita libere, et quiete, plenarie, et honori- 



GRANTS BY EARL DAVID 11 

fice, sicut aliqua abbacia in regno domini Regis fratris 
mei elemosinam liberius, et quiecius, plenarius, et honorifi- 
cencius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, domino J. episcopo 
de Aberdon, Roberto decano de Aberdon, Malisio filio 
comitis fertheth, W. Olifart, duobus Henricis filiis comitis, 
Roberto de parco, J. de Wiltune, W. Wascelyn, R. capellano, \Joi. 33.] 
Kineth iudice, H. de Bouilla, N. filio Malcolmi, Waldeuo 
clerico, H. de Noiers clerico comitis, Gilberto clerico comitis. 

(Abstract) 
( CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning CULSAMUEL and MUNKEGIN/ 

LET men present and to come know that I, Earl David . . . have 
given ... to God and the church of St. Mary and St. Andrew at 
Lundors, and the monks there serving God, for the weal of my soul, of 
the soul of my wife and of my ancestors and successors, all right which I 
have in Culsamuel and in Munkegyn, save the cane which pertains to 
the Bishop of St. Andrews, namely vj. shillings and vj. pence from 
Culsamuel, and iiij. shillings and iiij. pence from Munkegyn, in 
free, pure, and perpetual alms. I grant to them also their court for 
the men residing on their church-lands, free and exempt. Moreover I 
grant to them that their own men should be free from all toll and secular 
custom. But I forbid the said monks receiving any of my tenants or 
men on their lands. Wherefore I will that the aforesaid monks should 
hold and possess the said aforesaid as freely ... as any abbey . . . 
Witnesses . . . 

VI 

Carta Comitis Dauid de Redinch. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus comes Dauid 
frater Regis Scocie, salutem. Sciant tarn presentes quam 
futuri me dedisse et concessisse, et hac carta mea confirmasse, 
deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti Andree de Lundors, et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris totam insulam 
que uocatur redinche et omnes piscarias in they iuxta pre- 
nominatam insulam preter vnam piscariam meam, scilicet, vnam 
iharam ad colcrike. Tenebunt autem predictam insulam in 
puram et perpetuam elemosinam ita libere, quiete, plenarie, et 
honorifice, sicut alias terras suas ex dono meo liberius, quiecius, 
plenius, et honorificencius tenent et possident. Hiis testibus, 
domino A. abbate de Dunfermelyn, comite Duncano, Malisio 
filio comitis ferteht, Malcolmo filio comitis Duncani, Walkelino 



12 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

filio Stephani, Nicholaio de Anas, Roberto Basset, Johanne de 
Wiltun, W. Olifer, Radulfo de Cameys. 

(Abstract) 

' CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning REDINCH.' 

To all the sons of Holy Mother Church and the faithful, Earl David, 
brother of the King of Scotland, greeting. Let men, present as well as 
to come, know that I have given ... to God and the church of St. 
Mary and St. Andrew of Lundors, and the monks who serve or shall 
serve God there, the whole island which is called Redinch, and all the 
fisheries in the Tay near to the afore-named island, except my one fishery, 
namely, one yare at Colcrike. They will hold the aforesaid island in 
pure and perpetual alms as freely, etc. . . . Witnesses . . . 

VII 
Carta Comitis Dauid de Quarrario. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris, comes Dauid fra- 
ter Regis Scottorum, Salutem. Sciatis me dedisse, concessisse, 
et hac carta mea confirmasse monachis meis de Lundors, ut 
capiant lapidem in quarrario meo in hyrneside quantum uolue- 
rint in perpetuum, ubi melius eis uisum fuerit, tarn ad ecclesiam 
suam, quam ad omnia alia edificia que sibi fuerint necessaria 
construenda. Hiis testibus, Willelmo Wascelin, Walkelino 
filio Stephani, Roberto Basset, Nicholaio de Aness, Waltero 
Olifard, Philippe clerico, Henrico de Neueris, et aliis. 

(Abstract} 
' CHARTER of EARL, DAVID concerning the QUARRY/ 

To all who shall see or hear this writ Earl David, brother of the King 
of Scots, greeting. Know ye that I have granted ... to my monks of 
Lundors that they may take as much stone as they wish from my quarry 
in Hyrneside in all time coming, where it shall seem to them best, as 
well for their church as for all other buildings necessary for them to be 
afterwards constructed. Witnesses . . . 

VIII 
Carta Comitis Dauid de Wicheston, etc. 

VNIVERSIS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus tarn futuris 
quam presentibus, comes Dauid frater Regis Scottorum, 
Salutem : Sciatis me dedisse et concessisse et hac present! 



GRANTS BY EARL DAVID 13 

carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclessie Sancte Marie et Sancti 
Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem [deo] seruientibus, pro 
salute anime mee et animarum antecessorum et successorum 
meorum totam terram de pethergus per rectas diuisas suas, et 
terrain que iacet inter torrentem de Matheres et torrentem de 
eglesgirg, sicut cadunt in mari, et duas bouatas terre in 
Pethannot, pro centum solidatis terre, in liberam et puram, et 
perpetuam elemosinam, in bosco et piano, In pratis et pascuis 
et pasturis, In moris et mariciis, In stagnis et uiuariis, in 
aquis et molendinis, et in piscariis ; et in omnibus aliis liber- 
tatibus predictis terris iuste pertinentibus. Quare uolo et 
concede ut predicti monachi de Lundors habeant et possi- 
deant predictas terras, cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis, ita 
libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice, sicut aliqua abbacia uel 
domus religionis in toto regno Scocie aliquam elemosinam 
liberius, quiecius, plenius, et honorificencius, tenet et possidet. 
Hiis testibus, Waltero Olifard, Henrico filio Comitis Dauid, 
Walkelino filio Stephani, Willelmo Wascelyn, Roberto filio 
Roberti, Johanne de Wiltun, Gilberto Scoto, Willelmo filio 
Orme, Roberto de Inuerkileder, AJano clerico de Munros, 
Simone Albo, cum multis aliis. 

(Asbtract) 
( CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning WICHESTON, etc/ 

EARL DAVID grants to Lundores ' the whole land of Pethergus by its 
right marches, and the land which lies between the stream (torrentem) of 
Matheres and the stream of Eglesgirg, as they fall into the sea, and two 
oxgates of land in Pethannot, for one hundred shilling-lands (pro 
centum solidatis terre), in free, pure and perpetual alms, in wood and 
plain . . . mills and fisheries and in all other liberties justly pertaining 
to the lands aforesaid. Witnesses . . .' 

IX 

Confirmacio Comitis Dauid de Carucata terre 
de Balemawe. 

OMNIBVS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus comes Dauid 
frater Regis Scottorum, Salutem : Sciant presentes et futuri me 
concessisse et hac carta mea confirmasse, deo et ecclesie, Sancte 
Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo [>/. 



14 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

seruientibus illam carucatam terre quam ada filia mea, uxor 
Malisii filij comitis fertheth, eis dedit, Tenendam in liberam 
et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ita libere, quiete, plenarie 
et honorifice, sicut carta predicte ade testatur. Hiis testibus, 
Henrico abbate de aberbrothoc, Malisio filio fertheth, 
Henrico filio comitis Dauid, Willelmo Beuel, nicholayo de 
anes : Willelmo burdeth, Roberto basset, Galfrido de 
Wateruile. 

(Abstract) 

' CONFIRMATION of EARL DAVID concerning a PLOUGHGATE of LAND of 
BALEMAWE/ 

EARL DAVID confirms to Lundors ( that ploughgate of land which my 
daughter, Ada, wife of Malise, son of Earl Ferteth, gave to them.' 
It is granted in frankalmoign, 'as the charter of the aforesaid Ada 
testifies.' Witnesses. . . . 

X 

Confirm acio Comitis Dauid de terra de Neutyl. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Comes Dauid 
frater Regis Scocie, Salutem : Sciatis me concessisse et hac 
presenti carta mea confirmasse, deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie 
et Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruien- 
tibus et seruituris donacionem illam quam Willelmus Wascelin 
illis fecit de una bouata terre in villa de Neutile que iacet 
proxima terre ecclesie illius uille, inter superiorem uiam et 
collem, cum communi pastura cum hominibus eius in eadem 
uilla ad decem aueria, et triginta oues et vnum equum. 
Quare uolo et concedo ut predicti monachi teneant et habeant 
prenominatam terram cum predicta pastura, Ita libere, quiete, 
plenarie et honorifice sicut carta predicti Willelmi testatur. 
Hiis testibus, Ernaldo capellano meo, Philippo clerico de 
Dunde, Henrico filio meo, Bartholomeo de Mortemer, 
Roberto filio Roberti, Constantino de Mortemer, Adam filio 
Alani, Willelmo Gubiun, Henrico filio Walkelini. 

(Abstract) 
' CONFIRMATION of EARL DAVID concerning the LAND of NEUTYL. ' 

EARL DAVID confirms to Lundores 'that donation which William 
Wascelin made to them of one oxgate of land in the vill of Neutile, 



GRANTS BY EARL DAVID 15 

which lies next to the land of the church of that vill, between the high 
way and the hill, together with common pasture [to be enjoyed in 
common] with his [Wascelin's] men in the same vill, for ten beasts 
(averia), thirty sheep, and one horse.' To be held as freely, quietly, 
etc. as the charter of the aforesaid William testifies. Witnesses. . . . 



XI 

Carta Comitis Dauid de ecclesia de Wissindene. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus tarn pre- 
sentibus quam futuris, Comes Dauid frater Regis Scottorum, 
Salutem : Sciatis me dedisse et concessisse, et hac carta mea 
confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de 
Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus in liberam et 
puram et perpetuam elemosinam ecclesiam de Wyssindene Nota de 
cum omnibus ad earn iuste pertinentibus. Quare uolo ut pre- 
dicti monachi habeant et possideant prenominatam ecclesiam Anglia. 
ita libere, quiete et honorifice, sicut aliqua abbacia in episco- 
patu lincolniensi aliquam ecclesiam quiecius, liberius, et 
honorificencius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, Henrico 
abbate de Sancto Thoma, Willelmo et Ricardo capellanis 
comitis Dauid, Gaufrido clerico eius, Philippo clerico eius, 
Henrico filio comitis, Roberto Basset, Willelmo burdet, 
Gaufredo Wateruile, Waltero Olifard, Radulfo Games, Gille- 
berto Olepain, Walchelino Nuerres. 

(Abstract) 
CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning the CHURCH of WISSINDENE. 

EARL DAVID declares that he has ' given, granted, and confirmed to 
Lundors in pure and perpetual alms the church of Wyssendeiie, with all 
its just pertinents,' to be held as freely ' as any abbey in the diocese of 
Lincoln holds any church.' Witnesses. . . . 

XII 

Duplicacio carte de Wissendene. 

COMES Dauid frater Regis Scottorum Omnibus sancte matris 
ecclesie filiis presentibus et futuris, salutem : Noueritis me 



16 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

caritatis intuitu et pro salute anime mee, et antecessorum et 
successorum meorum, dedisse et concessisse et hac carta mea 
confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de 
Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam, ecclesiam de Wissendene cum omnibus 
ad earn iuste pertinentibus. Quare uolo quod predicti monachi 
habeant et possideant prenominatam ecclesiam ita libere, 
quiete, et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia in episcopatu lin- 
colniensi aliquam ecclesiam quiecius, liberius, et honorificen- 
cius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, Henrico abbate de 
Sancto Thoma, Willelmo et Ricardo, capellanis, Magistro 
Petro de Paxton. Ricardo filio Willelmi, Philippo clerico, 
Petro de Hach, Henrico de Scotte, Roberto basset, Simone de 
Seynlez, Roberto de Basingh, Ricardo de Lindesei, Willelmo 
86.} Burdet, Galfrido de Water |uile, Waltero Olifard, Radulfo de 
Kamais, Gilberto de holepen, Walkenio de Nuers, Henrico de 
Nuers. 

(Abstract) 
DOUBLE of the CHARTER concerning WISSENDENE. 

EARL DAVID repeats the Charter granting Wissendene to Lundors, 
adding that the gift was made ' at the prompting of charity, and for the 
weal of the souls of myself, and my ancestors and successors. ' Wit- 
nesses. . . . 

XIII 
Carta Comitis Dauid de ecclesia de Cuningtoun. 

VNIVERSIS sancte Matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus Comes 
Dauid frater Regis Scottorum, Salutem : Nouerint omnes 
tarn presentes quam futuri me dedisse et concessisse, et hac 
mea carta confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti 
Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in 
liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ecclesiam de 
Cunington, cum omnibus ad earn iuste pertinentibus. Quare 
uolo ut predicti monachi habeant et possideant prenominatam 
ecclesiam ad proprios usus et ad sustentacionem eorundem 
monachorum, Ita libere, quiete, et honorifice, sicut aliqua 
abbacia in episcopatu lincolniensi aliquam ecclesiam quiecius, 
liberius, et honorificencius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus. 



GRANTS BY EARL DAVID 17 

H. abbate de Sancto Thoma, Willelmo et Ricardo, capellanis 
comitis Dauid, Galfrido clerico, Simone de Seynliz, Walkelino 
filio Stephani, Roberto de Betun, Malcolmo filio Bertolfi, 
Nicholao de adles, Bartholomeo monacho, Roberto Basset, 
Willelmo Burdet, Willelmo filio Walteri, cum multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' CHARTER of EARL DAVID concerning the CHURCH of CUNINGTON.' 

EARL DAVID declares that he has given ... to Lundors in pure alms 
'the Church of Cunington with all its just pertinents to be possessed for 
their own uses/ to be held as freely as any abbey in the diocese of 
Lincoln holds any church. Witnesses . . . 

XIV 
Duplicacio carte de Cunington. 

COMES Dauid frater Regis Scottorum omnibus sancte matris 
ecclesie filiis presentibus et futuris, Salutem : Noueritis me 
caritatis intuitu, et pro salute anime mee et antecessorum et 
successorum meorum, dedisse et concessisse, et hac carta mea 
confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de 
Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam, ecclesiam de Cunington, cum omni- 
bus ad earn iuste pertinentibus. Quare uolo quod predicti 
monachi habeant et possideant prenominatam ecclesiam Ita 
quiete, libere, et honorifice, sicut aliqua abbacia in episcopatu 
lincolniensi aliquam ecclesiam quiecius, liberius, et honorificen- 
cius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, Henrico abbate de sancto 
Thoma, Willelmo et Ricardo capellanis, magistro Petro de 
Paxton, Ricardo filio Willelmi, Philippo clerico, Petro de 
Hach, Henrico de Scott, Roberto Basset, Simone de Seynliz, 
Roberto de Basingh, Ricardo de Lindesei, Willelmo Burdet, 
Galfrido de Wateruile, Waltero Olifard, Radulfo de Camais, 
Gilberto de Holepen, Walkelino de Nuers, Henrico de Nuers. 

(Abstract) 
' DOUBLE of the CHARTER concerning CUNINGTON.' 

THE charter is repeated ; but it is to be observed that the significant 
phrase ' for their own uses ' (ad proprios usus) does not appear in this 
double. Witnesses . 



18 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

XV 

Confirmacio Comitis Johannis de terra de Lundors 
et de Garuiach et de earum ecclesiis. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris, Johannes de Scocia 
Comes huntedun, salutem : Sciatis me concessisse et hac pre- 
sent! carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et 
sancti Andree de Lundors, et monachis ibidem seruientibus, 
donacionem illam quam bone memorie pater meus Comes 
Dauid fecit eisdem, scilicet, totam terram que iacet ab occiden- 
tali parte riuuli descendentis de Magno lacu de Lundors usque 
in they, et totam insulam que uocatur Redinche, preter vnam 
iharam, molendinum et predicte uille de Lundors, cum omni 
secta sua et multura ; Terram quoque quam tenent in Mernes 
ex dono eiusdem, patris mei ; terram de Perth que uocatur 
insula; Et ultra munethe fintreth, lethgauel et malind, cum 
omnibus pertinenciis, et per rectas diuisas predictarum ter- 
rarum, ecclesias quoque de Lundors, de Dunde, de fintrefe, 
de Inueruri, de Durnach, de Prameth, de Rathmuriel, de 
Inchemabanyn, de Kulsamuel, de Kilalcmond, et de dono 
Normanni constabularij ecclesiam de Lescelin, cum terris et 
decimis et omnibus ad predictas ecclesias iuste pertinentibus ; 
[fol. 36.] et vnum plenarium | toftum in uilla de Perth quern euerardus 
flandrensis quondam tenuit ; et vnum plenarium toftum in 
Dunde ; unum plenarium toftum in inueruri ; unam carucatam 
terre in Neutyl de dono ade sororis mee. Concedo eciam eis 
decimam omnium lucrorum et placitorum meorum infra terram 
meam et extra, ultra moneth, et decimas omnium rerum 
mearum et heredum meorum ultra moneth, sicut in carta 
predicti patris mei continetur. Quare uolo et concedo ut 
predicta ecclesia de Lundors et monachi ibidem deo seruientes 
habeant, teneant, et possideant omnia predicta cum omnibus 
suis pertinenciis, et curiam suam liberam omnino et dignitatem 
pacis, et omnes liberas consuetudines, quas aliqua abbacia 
habere debetur in regno Scocie, sine omni seruicio et consue- 
tudine et exaccione seculari, in liberam et puram et perpetuam 
elemosinam ; Ita quod nee ego, nee aliquis successorum 
meorum aliquid ab eis exigat, nisi solas oraciones ad anime 



EARL JOHN'S CONFIRMATION 19 

salutem pertinentes, sicut carta predict! patris mei eisdem facta 
testatur. Hiis testibus, Henrico de Striuelin fratre meo, 
Roberto de Campaniis, Johanne de Brus, Henrico Tuschet, 
Normanno constabulario, Henrico de Dundemor, Thoma de 
Lindeseia, Anketilo de foleuilla, Henrico de Boyuilla, Hen- 
rico de Wincester, Nicholao de Inuerpeffyn, Nicholao Meuerel 
clerico, et multis aliis. 

EARL JOHN'S CONFIRMATION of the LAND of LUNDORS and of GARRIOCH, 
and of their CHURCHES. 

To all who shall see or hear this writ John of Scotland, Earl of Hunt- 
ingdon, greeting. Know ye that I have granted and by this my present 
charter have confirmed to God and the church of St. Mary and St. 
Andrew of Lundors, and to the monks there serving [God] that gift 
which my father, Earl David, of good memory, made to the same, 
namely, the whole land which lies on the west of the burn flowing down 
from the great lake of Lundors as far as the Tay, and the whole island 
which is called Redinche, except one yare, the mill also of the vill of 
Lundors with all its suit and multure : the land also which they hold in 
Mernes, of the gift of the same my father : the land in Perth which is 
called Inch (insula) : and beyond the Mounth, Fintreth, Lethgavel, and 
Malind, with all their pertinents, according to the right marches of the 
aforesaid lands; also the churches of Lundors, Dundee, Fintrefe, Inveruri, 
Durnach, Prameth, Rathmuriel, Inchemabanin, Culsamuel, Kilalcmond, 
and, by the gift of Norman, Constable, the church of Lescelin, with the 
lands, tithes, and all things justly pertaining to the aforesaid churches ; 
and one full toft in the town of Perth, which Everard Fleming, formerly 
held ; and one full toft in Dundee, one full toft in Inveruri, one plough- 
gate of land in Newtyle, given by Ada, my sister. I grant also to them 
the tithe of all profits and of my pleas both within and without my land 
beyond the Mounth, and a tithe of all the property of myself and of my 
heirs beyond the Mounth, as is contained in the charter of my father 
aforesaid. Wherefore I will and grant that the aforesaid church of 
Lundors and the monks there serving God should have, hold, and 
possess all things aforesaid with all their pertinents ; and their court 
wholly free, and the dignity of the peace, and all free customs which 
any abbey in the realm of Scotland ought to have, without any secular 
service, custom, or exaction, in free, pure, and perpetual alms. So that 
neither I nor any of my successors may exact anything from them, save 
only prayers pertaining to the weal of the soul, as the charter of my 
father aforesaid, granted to them, testifies. These being witnesses, 
Henry of Strivelin, my brother ; Robert de Campaniis ; John de Brus ; 
Henry Tuschet ; Norman, Constable ; Henry de Dundemor ; Thomas de 
Lindesay ; Anketil de Foleville ; Henry de Boyville ; Henry de Wincester ; 
Nicholas de Inverpeffyn ; Nicholas Meverel, clerk ; and many others. 



20 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



XVI 

Carta Comitis Johannis de quadam terra in 
territorio de Lundors. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Johannes de Scocia, 

Comes Huntedun, salutem. Sciatis me dedisse et concessisse 

et hac present! carta mea confirrnasse deo et monasterio de 

De tercia in Lundors et monachis ibidem deo servientibus quandam partem 

Lundoris quam terre mee de Lundors quam eis perambulavi in propria persona 

terciam coram probis hominibus meis ultra divisas suas versus orientem 

Jonannes de ^ i 

Scocia per- ad dilatandum gardinum eorum. Quare volo ut predictam 
terram ita libere habeant et teneant sicut alias terras suas, 
quas de me tenent,liberius tenent et melius. Concedo eciameis 
et confirmo excambium factum inter ipsos et Galfridum 
Maupetit, sicut inter eos convenit. Hiis testibus, Henrico de 
Strivelin fratre meo, Roberto de Campaniis, Johanne de Brus, 
Normanno constabulario, Henrico Tuschet, Henrico de Dun- 
demor, Thoma de Lindeseia, Henrico de Boyvilla, Nicholao de 
Inuerpeffin, Nicholao Meueral, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' CHARTER of EARL JOHN concerning- certain land in the TERRITORY of 

LUNDORES.' 

EARL JOHN grants to the monks of Lundors ' a certain part of my land 
of Lundors which I have in person perambulated, in the presence of my 
good men, beyond their marches towards the east, for enlarging their 
garden.' The earl also confirms the exchange of lands (excambium) 
between the monks and Geoffrey Maupetit. Witnesses . . . 



XVII 
Carta Comitis Johannis de xx* 1 . solidis in Inueruri. 

OMNIBVS has litteras uisuris uel audituris J. de Scocia, Comes 
Cestre et Huntedon, salutem. Sciatis me dedisse et con- 
cessisse et presenti carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte 
Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo 
servientibus viginti solidos sterlingorum annuatim percipiendos 



GRANTS BY EARL JOHN 21 

de terra quam burgenses mei de Inueruri tenent de me 
ad firmam, que jacet inter burgum de Inueruri et pontem de 
Balhagerdyn, donee illos eisdem in loco certo assignavero: 
Tenendos et habendos de me et heredibus meis in puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam pro salute anime domini Hugonis de 
Roppel, ad pietanciam dictorum monachorum die anniversario 
eiusdem Hugonis. Et ego et heredes mei dictos xx. solidos 
dictis abbati et conventui contra omnes homines Warranti- 
zabimus. Hiis testibus, dominis Henrico de Striuelyn, B. de 
Paunton, H. Phyton, Galfredo de Appelby, Simone de Garen- 
tuly, Henrico de Boyvilla, David de Audereye, et aliis. [/** 

(Abstract) 
e CHARTER of EARL JOHN concerning xx. SHILLINGS in INVERURI.' 

EARL JOHN grants to the monks of Lundors twenty shillings sterling 
to be received annually ' from the land which my burgesses of Inveruri 
hold of me at rent (ad firmam) which lies between the burgh of Inveruri 
and the Bridge of Balhagerdyn, until I shall assign them [the twenty 
shillings] to the same monks in an appointed place.' This sum of 
money is to be held in pure and perpetual alms for the weal of the soul 
of Sir Hugh de Roppel ' for the pittance of the monks on the day of 
the anniversary of the same Hugh.' ' And I and my heirs will warrant 
(warrantizabimus) the said xx. shillings to the said abbot and convent 
against all men/ Witnesses . . . 



XVIII 

Carta Comitis Johannis de toftis de Inuerbervyn 
et Inuerrury. 

OMNIBVS Sancte Matris ecclesie filiis ad quos presens scriptum 
peruenit J. de Scocia, comes Cestre et Huntedon, salutem in 
domino. Noveritis me pro salute anime mee, patris mei, et 
matris mee, et omnium antecessorum meorum et successorum, 
dedisse, concessisse et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse deo et 
ecclesie beate Marie de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo ser- 
vientibus unum toftum in uilla de Inuerberuyn, illud videlicet 
quod fuit utting Cachepol, juxta a castrum ex parte australi pro 
escambio illius tofti quern Comes David pater meus eis dedit in 
eadem uilla, et unum toftum in uilla de Inueruri ad opus ecclesie 



22 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ejusdem uille et capellanorum ibidem serviencium, Illud scilicet 
dimidium toftum qui fuit Roberti de Bouerdyn, et unam rodam 
que fuit Bernardi, et aliara rodam que fuit utting Ruffi ; Tenenda 
et habenda de me et heredibus meis in perpetuum, libere, 
quiete, integre, pacifice, et honorifice cum omnibus pertinenciis, 
Hbertatibus, et aisiamentis ad predicta tofta pertinentibus, in 
liberam puram et perpetuam elemosinam. In cujus rei tes- 
timonium huic scripto feci apponere sigillum meum. Hiis 
testibus, dominis Henrico de Strivelyn, Simone de Garentuli, 
Willelmode Lacu, Walone de Burg, Girardo de Lindeseye, 
Ada de Audideleger, Nicholao de Inuerpephin, Roberto de 
Wrth clerico, et aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' CHARTER of EARL JOHN concerning 1 the TOFTS of INVERBERVYN and 
INVERURIE.' 

' J[OHN] of Scotland, Earl of Chester and Huntingdon, greeting in the 
Lord/ He gives, 'grants, and confirms to the monks of Lundors, for the 
weal of the soul of himself, his father, and mother, and of all his 
ancestors and successors, one toft in the vill of Inverbervyn, that, 
namely, which belonged to Utting- Cachepol, near the castle on the 
south side, in exchange for the toft which Earl David, his father, had 
given them ; and one toft in the vill of Inveruri for the use of the 
church of the same vill and of the chaplains there serving, namely the 
half toft which belonged to Robert of Boverdyn, and one rood which 
belonged to Bernard, and another rood which belonged to Utting Ruffus. 
To be held of the earl and his heirs, with all pertinents, liberties, and 
easements, in frankalmoign. Seal. Witnesses . . . 



XIX 

Carta Comitis Johannis de tofto in Dunde et de per- 
ambulacione de Durnach et de libertate molendini. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris Johannes de Scocia, 
Comes Cestre et Huntendun, Salutem. Sciatis me dedisse et 
hac carta mea confir masse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et 
Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus 
et seruituris vnum toftum in Dunde, proximum tofto Sancti 
Clementis uersus occidentern ; et piscariam in they proximam 



GRANTS BY EARL JOHN 23 

piscarie quam dedi domino Henrico de Brechyn, uersus 
portencrag : Tenendam sibi et habendam in liberam, puram, et 
perpetuam elemosinam. Concessi eciam eis ut terra ilia que 
perambulata fuit inter magnam Durnach et logindurnach 
coram me et Domino J. abbate de Lundors et aliis probis 
hominibus sit in communi in perpetuum, sicut recognitum fuit 
per sacramenta illorum qui terrain illam perambulauerunt, et 
quod de cetero non fiat aliqua perambulacio inter terras meas 
et terras illorum, sed teneant ipsas diuisas quas habuerunt 
tempore patris mei et tempore meo, sine molestia et sine 
grauamine, Volo etiam et concede ut quando uoluerint uel 
potuerint facere molendina in terris suis, nullus successorum 
meorum impediat homines manentes in terris ipsorum ire 
libere et quiete ad molendina ilia cum omni secta sua et 
multura, quamuis solebant sequi molendina mea quamdiu 
fuerunt sine molendinis propriis. Testibus, Domino H. de 
Striuelin fratre meo, domino Roberto de campaniis, domino 
Hugone Phyton, domino Galfrido de Appelby, domino 
Anketill de Foleuille, Petro et Rogero clericis, Hugone de 
Panton, Baldewino de anuers, Petro pincerna, apud Berewic. 

(Abstract) 

( CHARTER of EARL JOHN concerning a TOFT in DUNDEE, and concerning 
the PERAMBULATION of DURNACH, and concerning the LIBERTY of the 
MILL.' 

'JOHN of Scotland, Earl of Chester and Huntingdon/ grants to the 
monks of Lundors a toft in Dundee next the toft of St. Clement 
towards the west; and a fishery (a stake-net), in the Tay ' next the 
fishery which I gave to Lord Henry of Brechin, facing Porten- 
crag,' to be held in frankalmoign. ' I have granted also to them that 
the land which was perambulated between Great Durnach and Logic 
Durnach, in the presence of myself, and of the Lord J[ohn], abbot of 
Lundors and other good men, should be for ever in common, as was 
acknowledged on the oaths of those who perambulated that land ; and 
that in the future no perambulation shall be made between my lands 
and theirs, but they shall have those marches which they had in my 
father's time and in my time, without molestation. I also grant that 
when the monks wish and are able to make mills on their lands none of 
my successors shall impede the men residing on their lands from going 
freely and quietly to the mills, together with all their suit and multure, 
although they were accustomed to attend my mills so long as they were 
without mills of their own.' Witnesses . . At Berewic. 



24 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

XX 

Littere Comitis Johannis de Solucione secundarum 
decimarum. 

J. DE SCOCIA, comes Cestre et huntendun, Balliuis suis de 
Garuiach, Salutem. Mando uobis quatinus a termino Sancti 
Martini anno gracie. m. cc. xxx. quarto reddatis abbati de 
Lundors et humili eiusdem loci couentui decimas tocius terre 
mee de Garuiach ad ecclesiam suam de Lundors spectantes, 
sicut solui consueuerunt tempore patris mei et meo, secundum 
tenorem carte sue quam inde habent ; et non dimittatis 
quin hoc faciatis, valete. 

(Abstract) 
' LETTER of EARL JOHN concerning- the PAYMENT of SECOND TITHES.' 

' J[OHN] of Scotland, Earl of Chester and Huntingdon, to his bailiffs 
of Garviach.' 

He commands the bailiffs to pay to the abbot of Lundors and ' to the 
humble convent of the same place ' ' the tithes of my whole land of 
Garviach pertaining to their church of Lundors' from Martinmas in the 
year of grace 1234, as they were accustomed to be paid in the time of 
his father, and in his own time. 

XXI 

Littere Comitis Johannis de Solucione secundarum 
decimarum de Garuiach. 

\_fol. 38.] OMNIBVS presentes litteras inspecturis uel audit uris Johannes 
de | Scocia, Comes Cester et huntendun, Salutem : Nouerit vniuer- 
sitas vestra me teneri Johanni abbati de Lundors et eiusdem 
loci humili conuentui in quinquaginta et sex libris et tribus 
obolis sterlingorum pro decimis terre mee de Garuiach ad 
ecclesiam suam de Lundors spectantibus, computatis a tempore 
quo simon de garentulli Balliuam suam de me recepit vsque ad 
festum Sancti Martini anno gracie m. cc. xxx. quarto, 
decimis firmarum eiusdem termini in denariis eisdem compu- 
tatis, simul cum sexaginta et quatuor solidis et vij. denariis, de 
mutuo michi facto. In cuius rei testimonium presentes litteras 
meas patentes sigillo meo signatas eis habere feci. Valete. 



SECOND TITHES OF GARIOCH 25 

(Abstract). 

* LETTER of EARL JOHN concerning the PAYMENT of the SECOND TITHES 
of GARRIOCH.' 

' EARL JOHN ... to all who shall see or hear these present letters, 
greeting 1 . Let all of you know that I am bound to John, abbot of 
Lundors, and the humble convent of the same place in fifty-six pounds 
and three half-pence sterling for the tithes of my land of Garviach . . . 
computed from the time when Simon of Garentulli received from me 
his bailiffship up to Martinmas 1234 ; the tithe of the rents of that term 
being counted in the sum named, together with sixty-four shillings and 
sevenpence of a loan made to me. In testimony of which I have caused 
my present letters patent to be sealed with my seal. Farewell.' 

XXII 

Carta Domini Regis Alexandri de Westere fedale. 

A. DEI GUACIA Rex Scottorum omnibus probis liominibus 
tocius terre sue, salutem : Sciant presentes et futuri nos in 
excambium terre quam monachi de Lundors habuerunt apud 
Perth que uocatur insula, et in excambium terre de Dunmer- 
noch quam eis contulimus in straththay, dedisse, concessisse, 
et hac carta nostra confirmasse eisdem monachis terrain de 
fedal in theynagio de ouchyrardour : Tenendam et habendam 
eisdem monachis per rectas diuisas suas, et cum omnibus iustis 
pertinenciis suis in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam 
libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice ab omni seruicio, auxilio, 
consuetudine, et exaccione seculari : Reddendo annuatim xx. 
solidos, medietatem ad pentecosten. et aliam medietatem ad 
festum Sancti Martini : Saluis elemosinis nostris. Testibus, 
P. Comite de Dunbar, W. Comnyn Comite de menetheth, R. 
de quency, constabulario Scocie, W. filio alani, senescallo, 
Justiciario Scocie, Johanne Byset ; apud Are vicesimo die 
aprilis, anno Regni Domini Regis, vicesimo secundo. 

'CHARTER of our LORD, KING ALEXANDER, concerning WESTERE FEDALE.' 

A[LEXANDER] by the grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of 
his whole land, greeting. Let those present and to come know that 
in exchange for the land which the monks of Lundors have at Perth, 
which is called Inch (insula), and in exchange for the land of Dunmer- 
iioch which we granted them in Strathtay, we have given, granted, and 
by this our charter confirmed to the same monks the land of Fedale in the 



26 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Thanage of Ouchyrardour, to be had and held by the same monks, by 
its right marches, and with all its just pertinents, in free, pure, and 
perpetual alms, freely, quietly, fully and honourably, without any 
secular service, aid, custom, and exaction ; on rendering annually xx. 
shillings one half at Whitsunday, and the other half at the feast of 
St. Martin ; excepting our alms. Witnesses, P. Earl of Dunbar ; W. 
Comyn, Earl of Menteith ; R. de Quency, Constable of Scotland ; W. 
Fitz-Alan, Steward, Justiciar of Scotland ; John Byset. At Ayr ; the 
twentieth day of April in the twenty-second year of the reign of the 
Lord the King. l 



XXIII 

Recognicio diuisarum de Westere fedale. 

ANNO gracie m. cc. xlvj. tempore vicecomitatus Domini 
Johannis de Haya, Isti iurati recognouerunt secundum rectas 
diuisas de Westere fedale sicut Dominus Rex eas tenuit, et 
dictis monachis de Lundors per easdem dedit ; scilicet, per 
aldendoneche usque in aldnecrage, et per aldnecrage usque in 
lonbohthe quorum nomina sunt hec, Patricius Ker, Simon 
de fedale, et Gillemury films dicti Simonis, et Simon Derech, 
Gillebride, et gillefalyn filius dicti Gillebride, Gillecrist mac 
hatheny, et Gillecrist mac moreherthach, Gille ethueny, et 
Gillecostentyn, coram dicto Domino J. de Haya, et dicto 
Domino abbate et monachis suis de Lundors, et hominibus 
quamplurimis Domini Joachim, et hominibus Domini Episcopi 
Dumblanensis, Kessy Mackedny et aliis et Burgensibus de 
Outerardour, et hominibus Domini Comitis de Strathern, et 
hominibus Domini fergusii filij Comitis, Wilellmo de luuetot, 
Thoma clerico, Willelmo clerico, et multis aliis. In cuius rei 
testimonio, ex precepto Domini Justiciarii A. hostiarii per 
litteras suas patentes huic scripto sigillum suum apposuit. 

(Abstract) 

' INQUIRY as to the MARCHES of WESTERE FEDALE.' 

IN the year of grace MCCXLVI., in the time when Sir John de Haya was 
sheriff, certain persons whose names are given below were sworn to try 
and truly declare what were the right marches of Westere Fedale, as 
they existed when the king gave that land to the monks of Lundors. 

1 That is April 20, 1236. 



SECOND TITHES OF FEDAL 27 

These marches were declared to be by Aldendoneche as far as Aldnecrage, 
and by Aldnecrage as far as Lonbohthe. The names are Patrick Ker ; 
Simon of Fedale ; and Gillemury, son of the said Simon ; Simon 
Derech ; Gillebride ; Gillefalyn, son of the said Gillebride ; Gillecrist 
Mac Hatheny ; Gillecrist Mac Moreherthach ; Gille Ethueny ; Gille- 
costentyn ; before the said Sir John de Haya, and the said Lord Abbot 
and his monks of Lundors, and very many men of Sir Joachim, and 
men of the Lord Bishop of Dunblane,, Kessy Mackedny, and others, 
and burgesses of Outerardour, and men of the Lord Earl of Strathern ; 
and men of Sir Fergus, son of the earl ; William de Luvetot ; Thomas, 
clerk ; William, clerk, and many others. In testimony of which thing, 
at command of the Lord Justiciar, A. Durward (Hostiarii) by his 
letters patent, his seal was affixed to this writ. 



XXIV 

Carta Domini fergusii de fedal pro secundis decimis. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit fergus films 
Comitis Gilberti, Salutem : Sciatis me dedisse, concessisse, et hac 
present! carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et 
Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus 
et seruittiris in perpetuum, fedal que est in Kathermothel, pro 
decimis quas habere solebant annuatim de cano et redditibus 
meis tarn de Strathern quam de hure ex donacione Domini 
Malisii patrui mei ; Tenendam de me et heredibus meis, in 
liberam, puram et perpetuam elemosinam, per suas rectas diuisas 
et cum omnibus pertinenciis suis in bosco et piano, in terris et 
aquis, | in stagnis et molendinis, In moris et maresiis, in pratis [foi. 39.} 
et pasturis, sine aliquo retinemento, et cum communi aisiamento 
et libertate capiendi materiem in bosco meo ubi melius et 
proprius ipsis fuerit ad edificandum et sustentandum edificia 
necessaria et racionabilia in predicta terra, et ea que pertinent 
ad agriculturam. Ego autem et heredes mei warentizabimus 
eis predictam terram cum predictis asiamentis uersus Dominum 
Regem et uersus omnes homines, et liberam earn faciemus de 
excercitu et auxilio et de omni seruicio et exaccione tarn erga 
clericos quam erga laicos. Ita quod nee ego nee aliquis suc- 
cessorum meorum aliquid ab eis exigamus nisi solas oraciones 
ad animarum salutem pertinentes. Ipsi autem quietas cla- 



28 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

a MS. de de mauerunt omnes decimas quas habere solebant de dono a 
predict! Malisii patrui mei, et cartas quas inde habebant re- 
signauerunt. Testibus, Domino Roberto Comite de Strathern 
fratre meo, Waltero Oliphard, Waltero de Rotheuen, Henrico 
de Aschirche, Alexandro de Striuelyn, Willelmo de Bayllol, 
Rogero de leuuethot, Gilberto fratre meo, fergusio senescaldo 
meo, Rogero dispensatore meo. 
Ista carta duplatur. 

(Abstract) 
( CHARTER of SIR FERGUS, of FEDAL, for SECOND TITHES.' 

FERGUS, son of Earl Gilbert, gives, grants, and confirms to Lundors 
' Fedal, which is in Kathermothel, for the tithes which they were accus- 
tomed to have annually of my cane and rents, as well of Strathern as 
of Hure, of the gift of my paternal uncle (patrui) Sir Malise,' to be 
held ' of me and my heirs ' in frankalmoign, ' by its right marches 
with all its pertinents, in wood and plain, lands and waters, stanks 
and mills, moors and marshes, meadows and pastures, without any 
reservation, and with the common easement and liberty of taking 
material from my wood, where it shall be best and most suitable for 
them, for building and keeping up necessary and reasonable build- 
ings in the aforesaid land, and for those things which pertain to 
agriculture. ' 

He grants warrandice of the land and aforesaid easements, ' against 
the lord, the king, and against all men. ' ' And we will make it [the land] 
free of military service (exercitu), of aids, and of all service and exaction, 
as well in regard to clerks as laymen.' Nothing to be exacted in return 
save prayers for the weal of the soul. They (the monks) have quit- 
claimed all the tithes which they were accustomed to have by gift of the 
aforesaid Malise, his uncle, and have resigned the charters which they 
had from him. Witnesses . . This Charter is doubled. 



XXV 

Confirmacio Comitis Roberti de fedale, etc. 

VNIVERSIS hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris Robertus Comes 
de Stratherne, salutem : Sciatis me concessisse et hac present! 
carta mea confirmasse donacionem illam quam dominus fer- 
gusius frater meus fecit deo et monasterio de Lundors et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris, de fedale que 
st in Kather Mothel pro decimis quas habebant annuatim de 



GRANTS IN STRATHERN 29 

dono domini Malisii patrui mei quas ipsi quietas clamauerunt ; 
et cartas quas inde habebant resignauerunt. Quare uolo et 
concede ut predict! monachi habeant et possideant prenomina- 
tam terrain de fedal per suas Rectas diuisas et cum omnibus 
pertinenciis suis, sine aliquo retinemento, et cum communi 
asiamento et libertate capiendi necessaria tarn ad edificia 
quam ad agriculturam in bosco ipsius fergusii et heredum 
suorum, in liberam,puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ita libere 
et quiete ut ipsi nulli hominum inde respondeant de aliqua 
seculari exaccione, sicut carta ipsius fergusii testatur. Testibus 
Domino Innocencio abbate de insula missarum, Domino 
Gilberto archidiacono Dumblanensi, Magistro christiano 
fratre ipsius, Domino Thoma capellano Domini fergusii, 
Domino Ricardo de Kinbuch. Bricio de Dunyn, Gilescop de 

Cletheueys. 

(Abstract) 

'EARL ROBERT'S CONFIRMATION of FEDALE, etc.' 

ROBERT, Earl of Strathern, grants and confirms ' that gift which Sir 
Fergus, my brother, made to God and the monastery of Lundors . . . 
of Fedale which is in Kathermothel in exchange for the tithes which they 
had annually of the gift of Sir Malise, my paternal uncle, which tithes 
they have quitclaimed ; and they have resigned the charters [confirming 
the donation of tithes] which they had. . . . Fedale is confirmed with 
the rights and privileges named in Charter xxiv. Witnesses . . . 



XXVI 

Carta domini fergusii de Beny et con crag. 

VNIVERSIS hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris fergusius, filius 
Gilberti quondam Comitis de Strathern, salutem in domino. 
Noueritis me dedisse, concessisse, et hac carta mea confirmasse 
deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors, et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris, pro salute 
anime mee et murielis sponse mee, et animarum omnium paren- 
tum meorum totam terram meam de Beny cum omnibus 
pertinenciis suis, sine aliquo retinemento, per suas rectas diuisas 
et terram illam pertinentem ad Beny que iacet iuxta terram 
Rogeri deLuuethot militis mei, cum suis pertinenciis et diuisis: 
Tenendas et habendas sibi in perpetuum, in liberam, puram et 



30 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

perpetuam elemosinam, quietas ab omni consuetudine et 
seruicio, et excercitu, et auxilio, et omnibus aliis exaccionibus et 
consuetudinibus. Et ego et heredes mei warentizabimus eis 
predictas terras contra omnes homines, et adquietabimus de 
omnibus demandis in mundo. Testibus, Domino Clemente Dun- 
[fol. 40.} blanensi episcopo, Domino Roberto Comite de Stratherne | 
fratre meo, Waltero filio Alani de Rotheuen, Willelmo filio 
Duncani Comitis de Mar, Rogero de luuetoth, Adam filio 
Alani, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

1 CHARTER of SIR FERGUS concerning BENY and CONCRAG. ' 
' FERGUS, son of Gilbert, late Earl of Strathern/ grants to Lundors, 
' for the weal of my soul and of the soul of my spouse Muriel, and of all 
my relations/ my whole land of Beny with all its pertinents, and that 
land pertaining to Beny, which lies close to the land of Roger de 
Luvethot, f my knight/ To be held in frankalmoign, quit of all 
custom and service, and military service and aid, and all other exac- 
tions and customs. He and his heirs give warrandice against all men. 
Witnesses . . . 

XXVII 

Confirmacio Comitis Roberti de terra de Beny 
et concrage. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit, Robertus 
Comes de Strathern, Salutem in domino. Sciatis me concessisse, 
et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse donacionem illam quam 
Dominus fergus frater meus fecit deo et ecclesie beate Marie et 
Sancti Andree de lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus 
et seruituris de terra de Beny, et de terra ilia pertinente ad 
Beny, que iacet iuxta terram Rogeri de Luuethot militis 
ipsius, cum suis diuisis et omnibus pertinenciis sine aliquo 
retinemento. Quare uolo ut iidem monachi predictas terras 
habeant et possideant in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosi- 
nam, quietas ab omni consuetudine et seruicio et excercitu et 
auxilio et omnibus aliis exaccionibus et consuetudinibus, Ita 
quod predictus fergus et heredes sui warentizent et adquietent 
eis predictas terras uersus omnes homines de omnibus de- 
mandis, sicut carta ipsius fergusii testatur. Testibus, Domino 
Clemente Dunblanensi episcopo, G. archidiacono, Malisio 



GRANTS IN STRATHERN 31 

fratre meo persona de Gasch, Malisio senescaldo meo, Malisio 
filio meo, Gilberto fratre meo, Malisio persona de Crefe. 
Magistro Cristino et Bricio clericis meis, Gibun de Munfichet. 

(Abstract) 

e CHARTER of CONFIRMATION of EARL ROBERT concerning the LAND of 
BENY and CONCRAGE.' 

ROBERT, Earl of Strathern, confirms the gift e which Sir Fergus, my 
brother, made ' to Lundors, of Beny and the land pertaining to Beny 
near the land of Roger de Luvethot, f his knight/ in terms of the 
preceding charter. Witnesses . . . 



XXVIII 
Carta Domini fergusii de Cotken, etc. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit fergus films 
G. quondam Comitis de Strathern, salutem : Noueritis vniuersi 
terrain que dicitur Cotken, in Kather mothel, fuisse liberam et 
communem pasturam, tempore omnium antecessorum meorum, 
omnibus hominibus circa predictam pasturam manentibus : 
Ita quod nullus in ipsa pastura aliquam domum faceret uel 
araret uel aliquid aliud faceret vnde alij possent impediri ab 
usu ipsius pasture. Quare uolo et concede ut predicta terra 
in perpetuum ita sit libera et communis ut nee ego nee 
aliquis successorum meorum, per aliquam donacionem uel 
concessionem, communiam illam possimus auferre, et in huius 
rei perpetuum testimonium, huic carte mee sigillum meum 
apposui. Testibus, Domino Clemente Dumblanensi episcopo, 
Dompnis J. et N. de lundors et de Incheaffray abbatibus, 
Domino M. comite de Strathern, Malisio fratre meo, Magistro 
luca Decano Dumblanensi, magistro Duncano archidiacono de 
Strathern, Domino W. de Rotheuen, G. filio suo, Joachym de 
Kenbuc, Malisio senescaldo, militibus, Willelmo de luue- 
tofte, Brice de Ardros, Brice de Donyn, Malisio fratre suo, et 
multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' CHARTER of SIR FERGUS concerning COTKEN.' 

FERGUS, son of G., late Earl of Strathern, declares that the land 
( which is called Cotken in Kathermothel was in the time of all my 



32 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ancestors free and common pasture to all the men residing around the 
said pasture, so that none might build a house in the pasture, or plough 
any part of it, or do anything that would interfere with the use of the 
pasture.' He declares that it shall be common pasture for ever, and 
neither he nor his heirs shall have power by any gift to take away that 
common. He causes his seal to be affixed. Witnesses . . . 



XXIX 

Carta de Rathengoten de malisio filio ferteth. 

OMNIBVS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus tarn presenti- 
bus quam futuris, Malisius films Comitis fertheth, frater Comitis 
Gilbert! de Strathern, Salutem : Sciatis me dedisse et present! 
carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti 
Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in 
puram et perpetuam elemosinam, pro salute anime patris me! 
et anime matris mee, et animarum antecessorum et paren- 
tum meorum, et pro salute anime mee, et anime ade 
uxoris mee, filie Comitis Dauid, Rathangothen per rectas 
diuisas suas in bosco et piano, in pratis et pascuis, in moris et 
marasiis, in aquis, et in omnibus aliis aisiamentis, et cum 
omnibus pertinenciis suis, excepto Molendino et aqua stagni 
ipsius molendini, volo tamen et concedo quod monachi predicti, 
et homines eorum, qui predictam terram tenent de predictis 
monachis, molant bladum suum ad molendinum meum, libere, 
[fol. 41.] quiete, et pacifice, sine omni multura, et quieti sint ab omni 
seruicio seculari et consuetudine et exaccione. Quare uolo 
quod predicti monachi habeant et possideant predictam terram 
ita libere et quiete, plenarie et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia 
in toto regno Scocie aliquam elemosinam liberius, quiecius, 
plenius, et honorificencius tenet et possidet. Et ego et 
heredes mei predictam terram adquietabimus predictis monachis 
uersus Dominum Regem et heredes suos, et uersus omnes 
homines de omnibus secularibus seruiciis, et exaccionibus. 
Hiis testibus, Waltero olifard, Dauid de lindeseia, Henrico 
capellano, Elya capellano, Willelmo Capellano de lundors, 
Walkelino filio Stephani, Willelmo Wascelyn, Dauid olifard, 
Michaele homine Malisii, Douenaldo fratre Kineth, Gilberto 
filio Judicis de Strathern, et pluribus aliis. 



GRANTS IN STRATHEARN 33 

(Abstract) 
' CHARTER of MALISE, son of FERTETH concerning RATHEGOTEN.' 

' MALISE, son of Earl Fertheth, and brother of Earl Gilbert/ grants to 
Lundors, for the weal of the souls of his father, mother, ancestors, and 
relations, for the weal of the souls of himself and his wife, Ada, daughter 
of Earl David, Rathengothen ... in wood and plain . . . with all its 
pertinents, ' except the mill and the water of the stank of that mill.' 
The monks and their men, who hold the aforesaid land of the monks, are 
entitled to grind their corn at the mill without any multure, and shall 
be free from any secular service. He and his heirs will answer to the 
king and all men for all secular service and exactions. Witnesses . . 



XXX 

Confirmacio Comitis Gilbert! de Ratengothen. 

OMNIBVS sancte matris ecclesie filiis tarn presentibus quam 
futuris, Gilbertus Comes de Strath ern, salutem : Sciant tarn 
presentes quam futuri me concessisse, et hoc present! scripto 
meo confirmasse, deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree 
de Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam, Rathargothen, per omnes rectas suas 
diuisas, et cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis et asiamentis, 
ita libere, quiete, et honorifice sicut carta Malisii fratris mei, 
quam ipsi monachi habent de predicta terra, testatur et 
confirmat. Et ego et heredes mei adquietabimus predictam 
terram predictis monachis uersus Dominum Regem et heredes 
suos, et uersus omnes homines de omnibus seruiciis secularibus 
et exaccionibus. Testibus hiis, Abraham Dumblanensi epi- 
scopo, Johanne priore de Incheaffray, Gilberto archidiacono 
de Dumblayn, Roberto et fergus filiis meis, Malisio senescallo 
meo, Ricardo de Kinboch, Bricio persona de Crefe, et pluribus 
aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' CONFIRMATION of EARL GILBERT concerning RATEXGOTHEN.' 

EARL GILBERT confirms the grant as expressed ' in the charter of Malise 
my brother/ arid engages on behalf of himself and his heirs to be 
responsible 'for all secular services and exactions' due to the king and 
his heirs, or to any other. Witnesses . . . 

C 



34 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

XXXI 

Confirmacio Comitis Robert! de Rath engo then. 

OMNIBVS sancte matris ecclesie filiis tarn presentibus quam 
futuris Robertas filius Comitis de Strathern, Salutem : Sciant 
tarn presentes quam futuri me concessisse et hoc presenti scripto 
meo confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti andree 
de lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris, 
in puram et perpetuam elemosinam, Rathangothen, per omnes 
rectas suas diuisas cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis et 
asiamentis ita libere, quiete, plenarie et honorifice, sicut carta 
Malisii auunculi mei, quam ipsi monachi habent de predicta 
terra, testatur et confirmat. Et ego et heredes mei adquieta- 
bimus predictis monachis predictam terram uersus Dominum 
Regem et heredes suos, et uersus omnes homines de omnibus 
seruiciis et exaccionibus secularibus. Testibus hiis, Domino 
A. Dumblanensi episcopo, Domino G. Comite patre meo. 
J. priore de Inchaffran, G. archidiacono de Strathern, Bricio 
persona de Crefe, Malisio senescallo, Ricardo de Kinbuch, 
Willelmo clerico Comitis, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' CONFIRMATION of EARL ROBERT concerning RATHENGOTHEN. ' 

ROBERT, Earl of Strathern, confirms the grant as it was expressed in 
the charter of Malise, my uncle/ Witnesses . . . 



XXXII 

Confirmacio fergusii de Ratengothen. 

OMNIBVS sancte matris ecclesie filiis tarn presentibus quam 
futuris, fergus filius Comitis de Strathern, Salutem : Sciant 
tarn presentes quam futuri etc. ut prius in carta Roberti usque 
testatur et confirmat. Testibus, Domino G. Comite patre meo, 
Domino A. Dumblanensi episcopo, Domino Roberto fratre meo, 
J. priore de Inchaffray, G. Dumblanensi archidiacono, Malisio 
senescallo patris mei, Gillethoma x et Dunecano filiis Malysii, 
Willelmo clerico Comitis, et pluribus aliis. 

1 This word may perhaps be read * Gillechoma. ' 



CONFIRMATIONS 

(Abstract) 

[' CONFIRMATION of FERGUS concerning RATENGOTHEN.' 
' FERGUS, son of the Earl of Strathern,' confirms the grant as in the 
charter of Robert. Among the witnesses are ' G. the earl, my father/ 
and ' Robert, my brother.'] 

XXXIII 
Capitulum Dunkeldense de Rathengothen. 

OMNTBVS sancte matris ecclesie filiis hoc scriptum uisuris uel 
audituris capitulum ecclesie Dunkeldensis, Salutem: Nouerit 
uniuersitas uestra nos, assensu et auctoritate Domini nostri 
Episcopi H. dunkeldensis et communi consilio tocius capituli 
ecclesie nostre de Dunkeld, remisisse et quietum clamasse in 
perpetuum ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors, 
et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris coneuetum [fai. 42.] 
et redditum quem percipere solebamus ad opus Macleins et 
Scoloccorum in dimidia dauach terre de Rathengoten pro 
quatuor solidos quos Malisius, films Comitis ferthet de Strathern, 
et heredes sui nobis et successoribus nostris et ecclesie nostre 
in perpetuum persoluent sicut carta eiusdem Malisij inde facta 
et confirmacio Domini Alexandri Regis Scottorum, et Domini 
Gilberti comitis de Strathern, et Domini Roberti heredis sui 
testantur. Quare uolumus ut predicti monachi de Lundors 
tam presentes quam futuri predictam dimidiam Dauacatam 
terre de Rathengoten liberam teneant in perpetuum, et 
quietam ab omni exaccione que a nobis et successoribus nostris 
de cetero possit exigi, et ut haec nostra quieta clamacio robur 
perpetue firmitatis optineat presens scriptum sigilli nostri 
apposicione Roberauimus. Hiis testibus, H. archidiacono Dun- 
keldensi, Matheo Decano, Magistro Matheo, Eugenio clerico, 
Johanne de hetun, Magistro Roberto de Rapellis, Michaele 
persona de Kinrossyn, Willelmo capellano Dunkeldensi, Nazaro 
capellano, B. capellano de Kergille, B. clerico Domini H. 
Episcopi, Thoma capellano, Magistro alano, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' THE CHAPTER of DUNKELD concerning RATHENGOTHEN. ' 

To all the sons of Holy Mother Church ... the Chapter of the 
Church of Dunkeld, greeting. Let all of you know that we, with the 



36 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

assent and authority of our lord, H[ugh], Bishop of Dunkeld, and by the 
common counsel of the whole Chapter of our Church of Dunkeld, have 
surrendered and quitclaimed for ever to the Church of St. Mary and St. 
Andrew of Lundors . . . the conveth and rent (redditum) which we were 
accustomed to receive for the use of the macleins and scoloccs in a half 
davach of the land of Rathengoten, in consideration of four shillings 
which Malise, son of Ferthet, Earl of Strathern, and his heirs shall pay 
to us and our successors and our Church for ever. . . . f Our seal* 
attached. Witnesses . 



XXXIV 

Confirmacio H. Episcopi Dunkeldensis de 
Rathengothen. 

H. DEI gracia episcopus Dunkeldensis Omnibus sancte matris 
ecclesie filiis, Salutem in domino. Nouerit uniuersitas uestra 
capitulum nostrum de Dunkeld de assensu et auctoritate 
nostra remisisse, et quietum clamasse, deo et ecclesie sancte 
marie et sancti andree de lundors et monachis ibidem deo 
seruientibus et seraituris, redditum et Coneuetum quod ecclesia 
de Dunkeld percipere solebat annuatim de Ratengothen ad 
opus Macleins et Scollocorum pro quatuor solidos quos prefata 
ecclesia de Dunkelden in terra de Hure de cetero percipere 
debet ab heredibus Malisij filij Comitis fertheth, sicut in eorum 
auctenticis scriptis continetur, et per confirmacionem carte 
Domini Regis Alexandri corroboratur, ut autem hec rata et 
inconcussa futuris temporibus permanere ualeant, scriptum 
istud sigilli nostri munimine Roborauimus : Hiis testibus, H. 
archidiacono de Dunkeld, Matheo Decano, Magistro Matheo, 
Egenio clerico, Johanne de Hetun, Magistro Roberto de 
Rapellis, Michaele persona de Kinrossin, Willelmo capellano 
Dunkeldensi, Nazaro capellano, Bernardo capellano de Kergylle, 
B. clerico Domini H. episcopi, thoma capellano, magistro Alano,. 
et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

f CONFIRMATION of H[UGH], BISHOP of DUNKELD, concerning 
RATHENGOTHEN. ' 

' H[UGH], by the grace of God, Bishop of Dunkeld/ repeats the lan- 
guage of Charter xxxm., mutatis mutandis. Seal. Witnesses . . . 



CONFIRMATIONS 37 



XXXV 

Confirmacio Comitis Malisij generalis de Strathern 
et Hure. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus presentes litteras uisuris uel 
audituris Malisius Comes de Strathern, salutem eternam in 
domino : Nouerit vniuersitas vestra nos pro salute anime nostre 
et pro salute animarum omnium antecessorum et successorum 
nostrorum concessisse et hac presenti carta nostra confirmasse 
deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de lundors et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris omnes terras, 
possessiones, et libertates quas habent ex donacionibus et con- 
cessionibus Domini Malisii fratris Inclite recordacionis Domini 
Gilberti quondam Comitis de Strathern, et Domini fergusii 
auunculi nostri. Quare uolumus ut dicti monachi habeant, 
teneant, et possideant in liberam puram et perpetuam elemo- 
sinam omnes dictas terras, possessiones, et libertates cum omni- 
bus aisiamentis suis et iustis pertinenciis, et cum aisiamentis 
siluarum dicti Domini fergusii et heredum suorum adeo libere, 
quiete, pacifice, integre, et plenarie, sicut in cartis ipsorum 
super hiis confectis liberius et plenius continetur. In cuius 
rei testimonium presenti scripto sigillum nostrum fecimus 
apponi. Hiis testibus, venerabili patre Domino C. tune 
Dumblanensi episcopo, Domino Gileberto de Haya, domino 
Gilberto de Glencarny, Domino Joachim, militibus, Domino 
Nicholao Canonico de Incheaffray, Domino Ni|cholao camerario [foi. 43.} 
Comitis, Gilberto de Kenbuc, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
'EARL MALJSE'S general Confirmation of STRATHERN and HURE.' 

MALISE, Earl of Strathern, grants and confirms 'for the weal of our 
soul and of the souls of all our ancestors and successors ' to God and the 
church of St. Mary and St. Andrew of Lundors, etc., ... all the 
lands, possessions, and liberties ' which they have by the gifts and 
grants of Sir Malise, brother of the Lord Gilbert, late Earl of Strathern, 
of illustrious memory, and of Sir Fergus, our uncle,' with all the liber- 
ties, easements, and just pertinents, and with the easements of woods, 
in frankalmoign, as in the charters concerning these donations is con- 
tained. Seal. Witnesses . 



38 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

XXXVI 

Carta Ade filie Comitis de Balemagh. 

VNIVERSIS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus, Ada filia 
Comitis Dauid, vxor Malisii filij Comitis fertheth, Salutem : 
Sciant tarn presentes quam futuri me dedisse et concessisse, et 
hac carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et 
Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus 
in liberam et perpetuam elemosinam unam carucatam terre 
cum corpore meo in uilla de Balemagh, cum communi pastura 
eiusdem uille, liberam et quietam ab omni seruicio et exaccione 
seculari. Quare uolo ut predicti monachi predictam terrain 
habeant et possideant ita libere, et quiete, plenarie, et honorifice, 
sicut aliqua abbacia in regno Scocie aliquam elemosinam 
liberius et quiecius, plenius et honorificencius, tenet et 
possidet : Hiis testibus, Henrico capellano, Petro capellano, 
Malcolmo filio Bertulfi, Willelmo Wascelino, Hugone Malerbe, 
Kyneth, Anegus fratre eius, Winernero, Radulfo filio eudonis, 
Kilegirge filio Malisii, luone, Rainaldo. 

(Abstract) 
'CHARTER of ADA, Daughter of the Earl, concerning BALMAGH.' 

' ADA, daughter of Earl David,, wife of Malise, son of Earl Fertheth/ 
gives, grants, and confirms to the monks of Lundors in frankalmoign 
' one ploughgate of land, with my body, in the vill of Balemagh, with 
common pasture of the same vill,' free from all secular service. Wit- 
nesses . . . 

XXXVII 
Carta Willelmi Wascelyn de terra de Newetyl. 

OMNIBVS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus Willelmus 
Wascelyn et mabilia uxor eius, salutem : Sciatis nos dedisse et 
concessisse et hac carta nostra confirmasse pro salute animarum 
nostrarum, et antecessorum et successorum, et heredum 
nostrorum, deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de 
Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in perpetuam 
efc puram elemosinam, vnam bouatam terre in uilla de Neutile, 



GRANT IN NEWTYLE 39 

que iacet proxima terre ecclesie eiusdem uille, scilicet, inter 
superiorem uiam et collem, et communem pasturam, cum 
hominibus nostris, in eadem uilla ad decem auerias et xxx ta 
oues, et unum equum, libere, quiete, plenarie et honorifice, sine 
omni seruicio et auxilio et consuetudine et exaccione seculari. 
Volumus eciam ut predict! monachi et eorum homines, qui 
predictain terram de eis tenuerint, quieti sint de opere 
molendini nostri, non de multura, et quia concessimus predictis 
monachis, ut ubicunque in regno Scocie moriamur apud pre- 
dictum monasterium de Lundors corpora nostra sepeliantur, 
Volumus ut sepenominati monachi habeant et possideant 
predictam terram cum prenominata pastura, ita libere, quiete. 
plenarie, et honorifice, sicut aliqua abbacia in toto regno 
Scottorum aliquam elemosinam liberius, quiecius, plenius, et 
honorificencius tenet et possidet. Et nos et heredes nostri 
predictam terram adquietabimus cum pastura iam dicta ante- 
dictis monachis uersus Dominum nostrum Comitem Dauid et 
eius heredes, et uersus omnes homines de omnibus secularibus 
seruiciis et auxiliis, et consuetudinibus et exaccionibus, excepta 
multura molendini nostri. Hiis testibus, Henrico filio Comitis 
Dauid, Dauid de Haya, et eius fratre Thoma, Adam de Nesh, 
Roberto de Haya persona de Erole, Philippo senescallo et 
clerico Comitis Dauid, Willelmo persona de Dunde, Henrico 
clerico filio ylyf de Neutyl, Dauid de Audre, et Willelmo 
nepote eius, et Hugone fratre Willelmi, et Dauid oiselario, et 
multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' WILLIAM WASCELYN'S CHARTER of the LAND of NEWTYLE/ 

WILLIAM WASCELYN and Mabel, his wife, give . . . ' for the weal of our 
souls and of the souls of our ancestors and successors and of our heirs' 
to the monks of Lundors, in frankalmoign, ' an oxgate of land in the vill 
of Newtyle, namely between the high way (superiorem viam) l and the 
hill, and common pasture with our men in the same vill for ten beasts of 
burden (averias), thirty sheep, and one horse, free of all service, aid, etc. 
' And we will that the aforesaid monks, and their men, who hold the said 
land of them, shall be quit of the work of our mill, [but] not of multure. 
And, because we have granted to the aforesaid monks that, wheresoever 
we shall die in the realm of Scotland, our bodies shall be buried at the 
aforesaid monastery of Lundors, we will that the aforesaid monks shall 

1 Perhaps the sense is the ' upper road. ' 



40 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

have and possess the aforesaid land with the foreuamed pasture' as freely, 
etc. Wascelyn and his wife will be responsible for all secular service 
due to ' our Lord, Earl David, and his heirs,' or to any other, except the 
multure of the mill. Witnesses . . . 



XXXVIII 
Dauid de Sancto Michaele de tofto in munros. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Dauid de Sancto 
Michaele, Salutem in domino. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me 
dedisse, concessisse, et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse deo 
et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors, et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus pro salute anime mee et 
anime patris mei, et animarum omnium antecessorum et 
successorum meorum, in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosi- 
nam, redditum quern solebam annuatim percipere de tofto illo 
[foi. 44-] in munros quern bone memorie Rex Willelmus dedit Willelmo 
de Sancto Michaele patri meo et heredibus suis, quern videlicet 
toftum Henricus Griser quondam tenuit de predicto Willelmo 
patre meo et postea de me. Quare uolo ut predicti monachi 
habeant et possideant omne ius et dominium quod habui uel 
habere debui in predicto tofto die quo feci eis hanc donacionem, 
liberum et quietum de me et heredibus meis in perpetuum sine 
omni consuetudine, seruicio, et exaccione seculari, ita libere, 
quiete, plenarie, et honorifice sicut aliquam elemosinam liberius 
et quiecius in toto regno Scocie tenent et possident. Hiis 
testibus, Pliilippo cierico senescallo Comitis Dauid, Domino 
Johanne Giffard, Waltero de Cungertune, Thoma de Maleuile, 
Michaele de Inchethor, Waltero de maleuile, Willelmo de 
munfort, et aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' DAVID of ST. MICHAEL'S [CHARTER] of a TOFT in MUNROS.' 

DAVID of St. Michael gives to the monks of Lundors ' for the weal of my 
soul, and of the souls of my father, and of all my ancestors and successors,' 
in frankalmoign, ' the rent (redditum) which I used to receive annually 
from that toft in Munros which King William, of good memory, gave 
to my father, William of St. Michael, and his heirs, namely the toft 
which Henry Griser formerly held of the aforesaid William, my father, 
and afterwards of me. Wherefore I will that the aforesaid monks should 



GRANTS IN MONTROSE AND NEWTYLE 41 

possess all the right and lordship which I had, or ought to have, in the 
aforesaid toft on the day when I made this donation.' Without any 
service, custom, etc. Witnesses . . . 

XXXIX 

Confirmacio Robert! Griffyn de terra de Newtil. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scrip turn peruenerit Robertus Griffin 
ct Mabilia uxor sua, Salutem. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra nos 
concessisse et hac carta nostra confirmasse deo et ecclesie 
sancte Marie et sancti Andree de Lundors, et monachis ibidem 
deo seruientibus illam bouatam terre in Neutyl, quam Willel- 
mus Wascelyn eis dedit, et carta sua confirmauit : vt autem 
predictam terram libere, quiete, et pacifice in puram et per- 
petuam elemosinam teneant et possideant, dedimus eisdem 
unum toftum in uilla nostra de Neutyl et unam acram terre 
in augmentum subtus predictam bouatam. Et concedimus 
ut ipsi et homines eorum, qui terram prenominatam de eis 
tenuerint, quieti sint a multura et opere molendini et omnibus 
aliis consuetudinibus, et seruiciis et exaccionibus secularibus. 
Testibus, Domino G. abbate et conuentu de Aberbrothoc, 
Willelmo de la Karnayll, Roberto filio eius, Domino Wyot 
capellano, Elya seruiente nostro, et aliis. 

(Abstract) 
'ROBERT GRIKFYN'S CONFIRMATION of the LAND of NEWTYLE.' 

ROBERT GRIFFIN and Mabel, his wife, grant and confirm to the monks of 
Lundors the oxgate of land in Newtyle which William Wascelyn gave to 
them. Griffin and his wife give the monks in addition a toft in the vill 
of Newtyle, arid an acre of land, below the aforesaid oxgate. ' And we 
grant that they and their men, who hold of them the aforesaid land, 
shall be quit of multure, and of the work of the mill, and of all other 
secular services, customs, and exactions.' Witnesses . . . 

XL 
Carta Domine Ysabelle de Cragyn. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris, Ysabellade Brus, 
salutem in domino. Sciatis me dedisse, concessisse, et hoc 
presenti carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et 



42 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

sancti Andree de lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus 
et seruituris, totum mesuagium meum de Cragyn iuxta Dunde, 
cum tota terra mea ad me iiel heredes meos pertinente in 
eadem Cragyn, et in uilla que dicitur Mylnetoun, et in uilla 
Abrahe, sine aliquo retinemento. Tenendum sibi de me [et] 
heredibus meis in puram et perpetuam elemosinam ad sustenta- 
cionem unius monachi qui in predicto monasterio celebrabit 
missam pro anima mea et pro animabus antecessorum et suc- 
cessorum meorum in perpetuum, quod ipsi michi ad peticionem 
meam caritatiue concesserimt. Et ego et heredes mei omnia 
predicta predictis monachis Warentizabimus et adquieta- 
bimus de omni seruicio seculari et exaccione. Testibus, 
Dominis Willelmo de Brechyn, Willelmo de Lacu, Hugone de 
Beaumys, Michaele de muncur, militibus, Alberto de Dunde, 
Nicholao filio Roberti, heruino Koks, Normanno de castello, 
Burgensibus, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' THE LADY YSABELLA'S CHARTER of CRAGYN.' 

YSABELLA DE BRus gives to the monks of Lundors ( my whole messuage 
of Cragyn near Dundee, with all my land, pertaining to me and my 
heirs, in the same Cragyn and in the vill which is called Mylnetoun, and 
in the vill of Abraham, without any reservation. To be held by them 
of me and my heirs in pure and perpetual alms for the support of one 
monk, who in the aforesaid monastery will celebrate for ever a mass for 
my soul, and for the souls of my ancestors and successors ; which they 
[the monks] at my petition have charitably granted/ She and her heirs 
will answer for all secular service and exaction. Witnesses . 



XLI 
Confirmacio Domini Roberti de Brus de Cragyn. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris, Robertus de Brus, 
eternam in domino salutem : Noueritis me diuine pietatis 
intuitu concessisse, et presenti carta mea confirmasse donaci- 
onem illam quam domina Ysabella de Brus mater mea fecit 
deo et beate Marie et sancto Andree de lundors et monachis 
ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris, de toto mesuagio suo de 
Cragyn iuxta Dunde, cum tota terra ad ipsam uel heredes 
saos pertinente in eadem Cragyn, eciam in uilla que dicitur 



GRANT OF CRAGYN 43 

Mylnetoun, et in uilla Abrahe, sine aliquo retinemento ; 
Te | nendis et habendis sibi de dicta Domina Ysabella et here- [//. 45'] 
dibus suis, in puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ad sustenta- 
cionem unius monachi, qui in predicto monasterio celebrabit 
missam pro anima ipsius Ysabelle, et pro animabus ante- 
cessorum et successorum suorum in perpetuum, Ita libere et 
quiete, sicut carta eiusdem Ysabelle dictis monachis hide 
plenius confecta testatur. Hiis testibus, domino Alexandro 
Cumyn, Comite de Buchan, Domino Willelnio de Brechyn, 
Dominis Thoma de lascelis, Gilberto de haya, Humfrido 
de Kirkepatrik, Ingeramo de Monceus, Hugone Mauleuerer, 
Hugone de Berkelay, Hugone de Beaumys, militibus, Domino 
Henrico capellano meo, Adam clerico meo, et multis aliis; 
Apud Edenburg, anno gracie M cc xlviij , quinto ydus 

Augusti. 

(Abstract} 

' SIR ROBERT DP: BRUS'S CONFIRMATION of CRAGYN.' 

ROBERT DE BRUS grants and confirms f that donation which Lady 
Ysabella de Brus, my mother, made to God/ etc., f of her whole 
messuage of Cragyn/ etc. [all as in Charter XL.]. Witnesses ... At 
Edinburgh, 9th Aug. 1248. 

XLII 

Carta principalis de terra de Eglesmagril, et de 
ecclesia eiusdem uille, et de decimis de Cletheueis. 

CVM auctoritate Domini pape Innocencii iij,coram iudicibus 
delegatis, scilicet, Simone et Johanne, prioribus de Sancto 
Andrea et de May, et magistro laurencio archidiacono Sancti 
Andree, super ecclesia de Mothel questio mouetur inter 
Dominum Abraham episcopum Dumblanensem ex vna parte, 
et Guidonem abbatem et conuentum de lundors ex alia, Post 
multas hinc inde altercaciones predictus episcopus de assensu 
Nobilis uiri Gilbert! Comitis de Strathern, et Roberti heredis 
eius, et Gilberti archidiaconi episcopi, et Elphini prioris de 
Incheaftran et cleri eiusdem diocesis ex vna parte, et predictus 
Guido abbas de Lundors de assensu conuentus sui ex alia 
commiserunt se, iurisiurando sacramento interposito, potestati 
Willelmi bone memorie episcopi Sancti Andree ut ipse, appel- 
lacione remota, inter episcopatum Dumblanensem et monas- 



44 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

terium de lundors super ecclesia de mothel, pacem perpetuam 
prouideret. Ipse uero, assumptis secum uiris prudentibus et 
discretis, sub hac forma, inter predictasf pacem formauit, 
scilicet, quod predictus episcopus, de assensu predictorum, 
concessit deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti An dree de 
lundors, et abbati et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et 
seruituris, annuum redditum decem marcarum arbitrio boni 
uiri, ita assignatarum, scilicet, uillam que dicitur Eglesmagril 
per rectas diuisas suas cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis in 
bosco et piano, in pratis et pascuis, in moris et stagnis, et 
aquis et molendinis, et omnibus aliis asiamentis pro annuo 
redditu sex Marcarum, liberam et quietam ab auxiliis et 
excercitibus, et canis et coneuetibus, et omni seruicio et exac- 
cione, et consuetudine seculari, Ita quod predictus Gilbertus 
Comes de Strathern pro se et heredibus suis in perpetuum 
suscepit onus exercitus, et Dominus Episcopus Abraham Dum- 
blanensis et successores sui omnia alia onera sustinebunt, et 
insuper ecclesiam eiusdem uille, cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis 
suis in assignacionem redditus duarum marcarum liberam et 
quietam ab hospiciis et procuracionibus et auxiliis, et ceteris 
episcopalibus, preter cathedradicum et canonicam iusticiam, et 
omnes decimas et decimaciones de Cletheues, tarn de blado 
quam de omnibus aliis que decimari possunt, in assignacionem 
duarum marcarum liberas et quietas ab omni oneri. Hunc 
autem redditum decem marcarum ita libere et quiete, in 
perpetuum a predicto monasterio possidendum, predictus 
episcopus et successores sui contra omnes homines warenti- 
zabunt. Dominus uero Guido, abbas de lundors, pro se et 
conuentu suo, et successoribus suis, quietum clamauit in 
perpetuum deo et ecclesie Dumblanensi et Domino Abraham 
eiusdem loci episcopo et successoribus suis ius quod petebat in 
ecclesiam de Mothel ex donacione nobilis viri malisij fratris 
[fol. 46.] predicti Comitis Gilberti | et cartas quas super ecclesia eadem 
habuerunt Resignauerunt, et ne idem episcopus uel aliquis 
successorum suorum a predicta concessione et donacione possit 
resilire, uel predicti abbas et conuentus uel eorum successores 
contra suam quietam clamacionem possint uenire, subicierunt 
se utrumque potestati predicti Willelmi episcopi sancti 
andree et eius successorum, ut ipsi, appellacione remota, eos 



LAND AND CHURCH OF EGLESMAGRIL 45 

possint in perpetuum compellere stare predictis coricessioni et 
quiete clamacioni. Et in huius rei testimonium haec signa 
sunt apposita, scilicet, signum Domini Willelmi episcopi sancti 
Andree, et signa iudicum delegatorum, scilicet, Simonis et 
Johannis, priorum de sancto andrea et de May, et Magistri 
laurencii archidiaconi sancti andree, et abrahe episcopi Dum- 
blanensis, et Gilberti Comitis de Stratherne, et Gilberti archi- 
diaconi Dunblanensis, et cleri eiusdem diocesis, et signum 
prioris et conuentus de Incheaffray, et signa filiorum Comitis 
G., Roberti scilicet et fergusii. 

PRINCIPAL CHARTER concerning the LAND of EGLESMAGRIL, and the 
CHURCH of the same VILL, and concerning the TITHES of CLETHEUEIS. 

WITH the authority of the Lord Pope, Innocent m., a question as to the 
church of Mothel is raised between the Lord Abraham, Bishop of Dun- 
blane, of the one part, and Guido, the abbot and the convent of Lundors, 
of the other, before the judges delegate, namely, Simon and John, 
Priors of St. Andrews and the May, and Master Laurence, Archdeacon 
of St. Andrews. After many discussions on the one side and the other, 
the bishop aforesaid (with the assent of the noble man, Gilbert, Earl of 
Strathern, and of Robert, his heir, and of Gilbert, Archdeacon of the 
Bishop, and of Elphin, Prior of Inchaffran, and of the clergy of the same 
diocese) of the one part, and the aforesaid Guido, Abbot of Lundors 
(with the assent of his convent), of the other part, took an oath to 
submit themselves to the authority of the Bishop of St. Andrews, William, 
of good memory, to the end that he, 110 appeal being allowed, should 
arrange a lasting agreement between the bishopric of Dunblane and the 
monastery of Lundors in respect to the church of Mothel. He [the 
Bishop of St. Andrews] having conjoined with himself prudent and dis- 
creet men, made peace between the aforesaid in the following form : 
' The bishop aforesaid [the Bishop of Dunblane], with the assent of the 
aforesaid, has conceded to God and the church of St. Mary and St. 
Andrew of Lundors, and to the monks who now serve and shall hereafter 
serve God in that place, an annual payment of ten marks, according to 
the decree-arbitral of a good man, to be assigned as follows, that the vill 
which is called Eglesmagril, by its right marches with all its just per- 
tinents, in wood and plain, in meadows and pastures, in moors and 
stanks, in waters and mills, and all other easements, shall for the 
payment of six marks be free and quit of aids and military service 
(hostings), and canes and conveths, and all service and exaction and 
secular custom. The aforesaid Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, has for 
himself and his heirs, undertaken for ever the burden of military service 
(hostings), and Abraham, Lord Bishop of Dunblane, and his successors 
will sustain all other burdens. 



46 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

And moreover [it was pronounced] that the church of the same vill, 
with all its just pertinents, for a payment of two marks should be free 
and quit of hospitia and procurations, and aids and other episcopal dues, 
excepting the cathedraticum and canonical justice. And [it was pro- 
nounced] that all the tithes and tithings of Cletheues, as well in corn as 
in all other things which can be tithed, shall be free and quit of all 
burdens for the payment of two marks. And that this payment of ten 
marks shall be possessed free and quit for ever, by the monastery afore- 
said, the aforesaid bishop and his successors give warrandice against all 
men. And the Lord Guido, Abbot of Lundors, for himself, his convent, 
and their successors, has quitclaimed for ever to God and the church of 
Dunblane, and to the Lord Abraham, bishop of the same place, and his 
successors, the right which he sought over the church of Mothel, as 
granted by the noble man, Malise, brother of the aforesaid Earl Gilbert. 
And the charters which they had in regard to the same church they 
have resigned. And lest the same bishop or any of his successors 
might resile from the aforesaid grant and gift, or lest the aforesaid abbot 
and convent, and their successors, might act contrary to their quit- 
claim, they have severally subjected themselves to the power of the 
aforesaid William, Bishop of St. Andrews, and his successors, so that 
they [the Bishops of St. Andrews] may be able (no appeal being allowed) 
to compel them to stand to the aforesaid grant and quitclaim.' And in 
testimony of this these seals are affixed, namely, the seal of the Lord 
William, Bishop of St. Andrews ; and the seals of the judges delegate, 
namely, of Simon and John, Priors of St. Andrews and the May ; and of 
Master Laurence, Archdeacon of St. Andrews ; and of Abraham, Bishop 
of Dunblane ; and of Gilbert, Earl of Strathern ; and of Gilbert, Arch- 
deacon of Dunblane ; and of the clergy of the same diocese ; and the 
seal of the prior and convent of Inchaffray ; and the seals of the sons of 
Earl Gilbert, namely Robert and Fergus. 



XLIII 

Carta Comitis Gilbert! de excercitu faciendo 
pro Eglesmagril. 

OMNIBVS has litteras uisuris uel audituris, Gilbertus Comes de 
Strathern, Salutem : Nouerit uniuersitas vestra de assensu et 
uoluntate mea et Robert! heredis me! per virum venerabilem 
Willelmum episcopum Sancti Andree causam, que uertebatur 
inter uenerabilem patrem nostrum Abraham episcopum Dum- 
blanensem ex una parte et Dominum Guidonem abbatem et. 
monachos de Lundors ex alia, super ecclesiam de Mothel 



HOSTING FOR EGLESMAGRIL 47 

amicabiliter esse terminatam iuxta quod in auctentico instru- 
mento inter eosdem super predicta pace confecto continetur ; 
Ita quod ego pro me et heredibus meis in me et heredes meos 
suscepi onus excercitus que debetur de terra de Eglesmagril 
que eisdem abbati et monacbis est assignata pro annuo redditu 
sex marcarum in perpetuum, et ne hoc factum meum aliquem 
possit latere in posterum ipsum presentis pagine testimonio et 
sigilli mei apposicione dignum duxi declarandum. Hiis 
testibus, Willelmo episcopo Sancti Andree, Abraham episcopo 
Dumblanensi, Bricio persona de Crefe, et eius filio malisio, 
Rogero de Mortimero, Reginaldo de Dunbernyn, Gillenem et 
malisio senescallis Comitis, anecol et Gillemor filio eius, cum 
multis aliis. 

CHARTER of EARL GILBERT concerning- rendering MILITARY SERVICE 

(exercitu) for EGLESMAGRIL. 

To all who shall see or hear these letters, Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, 
greeting. Let all of you know that, with the assent and approval of me 
and of Robert, my heir, the cause which was in dispute between our 
venerable father, Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane, of the one part, and 
Guido, the abbot, and the monks of Lundors, of the other part, concerning 
the church of Mothel, has been amicably settled by the venerable man, 
William, Bishop of St. Andrews, according to the terms contained in the 
authentic instrument executed between them in reference to the agree- 
ment aforesaid. In accordance with which I, on behalf of myself and my 
heirs, have taken upon me and my heirs the burden of the military 
service which is due from the land of Eglesmagril, which has been 
assigned to the said abbot and monks, for an annual payment, for ever, 
of six marks. And lest this my act might in the future be unknown to 
any, I have thought fit that it should be declared by the testimony of 
this present writ and by the affixing of my seal : these being witnesses, 
William, Bishop of St. Andrews ; Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane ; Brice, 
Parson of Crefe, and his son, Malise ; Roger de Mortimer ; Reginald de 
Dunbernyn ; Gillenem and Malise, seneschals of the earl ; Anecol, and 
Gillemor, his son ; with many others. 



XLIV 

Confirmacio Comitis Robert! de exercitu pro 
eglesmagril. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris, Robertus Comes de 
Strathern, Salutem : noueritis me concessisse et gratum habere 



48 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

quod bone memorie Gilbertus Comes pater meus suscepit in se 
et heredes suos facere excercitum Domini Regis pro terra de 
Eglesmagril in perpetuum. Quare uolo ut nullus de cetero 
aliquod grauamen faciat predicte terre uel alicui manenti in ea 
pro tali exaccione, de qua ego et heredes mei illam adquieta- 
bimus. Et in huius rei testimonium huic scripto sigillum 
meum apponere feci. Testibus, Domino C. episcopo nostro, 
Domino fergus fratre meo, Domino malisio senescaldo meo, 
Domino Rogero de luuetoth, Malisio persona fratre meo, 
Magistro Cristiano, Malisio filio meo, Gilberto et Bricio de 
Morauia. 

(Abstract) 

' CONFIRMATION of EABL ROBERT concerning MILITARY SERVICE 
for EGLESMAGRIL.' 

ROBERT, Earl of Strathern, declares that he holds good the under- 
taking of his father, Earl Gilbert, to ' make the hosting of the Lord 
King ' for the land of Eglesmagril. ' Wherefore I will that in future no 
one put any burden on the said land or on any one residing on it for such 
exaction, for which I and my heirs will be responsible.' Seal affixed. 
Witnesses . . . 

XLV 
De ecclesia de eglesmagril. 

ABRAHAM miseracione diuina Dumblanensis ecclesie minister 
humilis omnibus has litteras uisuris uel audituris, eternam in 
domino Salutem : Sciatis nos de assensu Gilberti, archidiaconi, 
et cleri ecclesie nostre, concessisse abbati et conuentui de lundors 
annuum redditum duaram marcarum de camera nostra et 
successorum nostrorum, die Natiuitatis sancti Johannis Baptiste 
et die natalis Domini percipiendarum in uita patricij persone 
de Eglesmagril, qui eandem ecclesiam in tota uita sua pacifice 
possidebit. Eo autem cedente uel decedente, predicta ecclesia 
libera et quieta cum omni integritate sua redibit ad predictum 
conuentum ; Juxta quod in autentico instrumento super pace 
[/<?/. 47.] inter nos inito continetur. | Nos autem et successores nostri de 
cetero liberi et quieti erimus a solucione predictarum duarum 
marcarum. Hiis testibus, Willelmo episcopo Sancti Andree, 
Gilberto Comite de Stathern, Elpino priore de Incheaffran, 



CHURCH OF EGLESMAGRIL 49 

Roberto et fergoso filiis Comitis Gilbert!, Gilberto archidiacono- 
Dunblanensi, Bricio persona de Crefe, Gillenem et Malisio 
senescallis Comitis Gilberti, Malisio filio Bricij persone de Crefe, 
cum multis aliis. 

' CONCERNING the CHURCH of EGLESMAGRIL.' 

ABRAHAM, by the divine mercy humble minister of the church of 
Dunblane, to all who shall see or hear these letters, health everlasting 
in the Lord. Know ye that with the assent of Gilbert, the archdeacon, 
and the clergy of our church, we have granted to the abbot and convent 
of Lundors an annual payment of two marks from the treasury (camera) 
of ourselves and our successors, to be received on the day of the Nativity 
of St. John the Baptist [June 24] and on Christmas Day during the life 
of Patrick, parson of Eglesmagril, who shall peaceably possess the same 
church during the whole of his life. But, on his resigning or dying, the 
aforesaid church shall return in all its completeness to the aforesaid 
convent, according to what is contained in the authentic instrument of 
agreement made between us. But in the future we and our successors 
shall be free and quit of the payment of the two marks aforesaid. These 
are the witnesses : William, Bishop of St. Andrews ; Gilbert, Earl 
of Strathern ; Elpin, Prior of Inchaffran ; Robert and Fergus, sons of 
Earl Gilbert ; Gilbert, Archdeacon of Dunblane; Brice, Parson of Crefe ; 
Gillenem and Malise, seneschals of Earl Gilbert ; Malise, son of Brice, 
Parson of Crefe ; with many others. 



XLVI 

Quieta clamacio Coneueti de Eglesmagril. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Macbeth, Rex 
scolarum de Dumblayn, et eiusdem loci scolastici, Salutem : 
Noueritis nos com muni consilio et assensu quiet um clamasse in 
perpetuum deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de 
Lundors et abbati et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et 
seruituris, pro nobis et successoribus nostris, Coneuetum quod 
solebamus percipere in uilla de Eglesmagril annuatim, pro 
redditu duorum solidorum, quos Dominus A. Dumblanensis 
episcopus et eius successores nobis dabunt annuatim, ad pente- 
costen, de firma sua de Drumendufelis, sicut in cirograffo inter 
episcopum et ipsos monachos et nos confecto continetur. Et 
quia sigillum non habuimus, ad nostram peticionem Dominus 

D 



50 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Willelmus episcopus sancti Andree sigillum suum huic scripto 
apposuit in testimonium. 

QUITCLAIM of CONVETH from EGLESJIAGRIL. 

To all whom the present writ shall come, Macbeth, King (Rex) of the 
schools of Dunblane, and the scholastics of the same place, greeting. 
Know ye that we, by common counsel and consent, have, for ourselves 
and our successors, quitclaimed for ever to God and the church of 
St. Mary and St. Andrew of Lundors and the abbot and monks there 
serving, or who shall hereafter serve God in that place, the conveth 
which we were accustomed to receive annually in the vill of Eglesmagril, 
in return for the payment of two shillings, which the Lord A[braham], 
Bishop of Dunblane and his successors will give us annually out of his 
rent from Drumendufelis, as is contained in the deed executed between 
the bishop, the monks, and us. And because we have no seal, the Lord 
William, Bishop of St. Andrews, has, at our request, affixed, in testi- 
mony, his seal to this writ. 

XLVII 

Quieta Clamacio Coneueti de Eglesmagril. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens script um peruenerit Malduueny, 
Rex scolarum de Mothel, et eiusdem loci scolastici, salutem. 
Nouerit vniuersitas vestra nos communi consilio et cetera de 
uerbo ad uerbum ut in precedenti proxima. 

QUITCLAIM of CONVETH from EGLESMAGRIL. 

To all to whom the present writ shall come, Malduveny, King (Rex) of 
the schools of Mothel, and the scholastics of the same place, greeting. 
Let all of you know that we, by common counsel : and the rest, word for 
word as in the next preceding. 

XLVIII 

Quieta clamacio Coneueti de Eglesmagril. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Clerici de 
Methfyn, salutem : Noueritis nos communi consilio quietum 
clamasse in perpetuum, pro nobis et successoribus nostris, deo 
et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti Andree de lundors et abbati 
et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris Coneuetum 



QUITCLAIMS OF CONVETH 51 

quod solebamus percipere annuatim in uilla de Eglesmagril, pro 
redditu duorum solidorum quos Dominus A. Dumblanensis 
episcopus et eius successores nobis dabunt annuatim, ad 
pentecosten, de camera sua. Et quia sigillum non habuimus, 
ad peticionem nostram Dominus W. episcopus Sancti Andree 
huic scripto apposuit in testimonium sigillum suum. 

(Abstract) 

QUITCLAIM of CONVETH from EGLESMAGRIL. 

THE Clerks of Methfyn quitclaim for ever the annual conveth which 
they were accustomed to receive in the vill of Eglesmagril, for the pay- 
ment of two shillings which Abraham and his successors, Bishops of 
Dunblane, will give to them at Whitsunday from his treasury. ' And 
because we have no seal,' etc. [As in Charter XLVI.] 

XLIX 
Confirmacio E. prioris de Incheaffran de Cletheueys. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus has litteras 
uisuris uel audituris, Elphinus dei gracia prior de Incheaffran, 
et eiusdem loci conuentus, eternam in Domino salutem : 
Noueritis nos concessisse et hac carta nostra confirmasse deo et 
ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de lundors et eiusdem 
loci conuentui omnes decimas de Clethues tarn de blado quam de 
omnibus aliis rebus que decimari debent ; Ita libere et quiete, 
plene et honorifice, sicut vir venerabilis Abraham episcopus 
Dumblanensis eas cum assensu et auctoritate clericorum suorum, 
tarn archidiaconi quam aliorum, eisdem monachis de lundors 
dedit et carta sua confirmauit. Et quia sigillum commune 
tempore huius confirmacionis non habuimus, in rei facte 
testimonium Domini nostri Gilberti, Comitis de Strathern, huic 
presenti pagine fecimus apponi sigillum. Hiis testibus, 
Abraham episcopo Dumblanensi, Gilberto archidiacono eiusdem, 
Bricio persona de Crefe, et Malisio [filio] eius, duobus filiis 
Comitis Gilberti Roberto et Fergusio, Malisio senescallo 
Comitis, et quoad amplius, Teste capitulo nostro. 

(Abstract) 

' CONFIRMATION of E., PRIOR of INCHEAFFRAN, concerning CLETHEUEYS.' 

' ELPHIN, by the grace of God Prior of Incheaffran, and the convent of 

the same place,' grants and confirms to Lundors all the tithes of Clethues, 



52 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

as well in grain as in all other things which are liable to tithe, as freely 
... as the Bishop of Dunblane, Abraham, gave them to the same monks, 
with the assent and authority of the clergy, the archdeacon, and others. 
And because at the time of this confirmation we had not the common 
seal ... we have caused the seal of our lord, Gilbert, Earl of 
Strathern, to be affixed to this writ in testimony of what has been 
done. Witnesses . . . 



Sentencia Judicum Delegatorum Auctoritate 
Domini Pape super Eglesmagril. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Willelmus dei 
[/&/. 48.] gracia episcopus, Hugo Decanus, et Robertus thesaurarius | 
Glasguenses, eternam in domino salutem. Mandatum domini 
pape suscepimus in hec uerba. Gregorius Episcopus, seruus 
seruorum dei, venerabili fratri . . Episcopo, et dilectis filiis, 
Decano et Thesaurario Glasguensibus, Salutem et apostolicam 
benediccionem : venerabili fratre nostro, Dumblanensi episcopo, 
accepimus intimante, quod cum inter bone memorie A. pre- 
decessorem suum ex parte vna, et Abbatem et conuentum de 
lundors Sancti Andree diocesis ex altera, super ecclesia de 
Mothel coram . . priore Sancti Andree suisque Collegis 
auctoritate apostolica questio uerteretur; Demum hinc inde 
fuit iuramento prestito in uenerabilem fratrem nostrum Epi- 
scopum Sancti Andree tanquam in arbitrum compromissum, 
qui equitate postposita iniquum arbitrium promulgauit, in 
enormes ecclesie dumblanensis lesiones. Quare idem episcopus 
ecclesie predicte subueniri per beneficium restitucionis in 
integrum postulauit. Ideoque discrecioni vestre per apostolica 
scripta mandamus, quatinus si per arbitrium ipsum inueneritis 
Dumblanensem ecclesiam enormiter esse lesam, ad restitu- 
cionem ipsius sicut iustum fuerit procedatis, facientes quod 
super hoc statueritis per censuram ecclesiasticam firmiter 
obseruari : Testes autem qui fuerint nominati, si se gracia, 
odio, uel timore subtraxerint, censura simili, appellacione 
cessante, cogatis ueritati testimonium perhibere. Quod si 
non omnes hiis exequendis potueritis interesse, Tu, frater 
Episcope, cum eorum altero, ea nichilominus exequaris. 
Datum Perusij, iij. Non. Nouembr., pontificatus nostri anno 



LITIGATION AS TO EGLESMAGRIL 53 

Octauo. Huius igitur auctoritate mandati partibus in nostra 
presencia constitutis, et auditis hincinde propositis, Nos dili- 
genter causam examinantes, licet arbitrium a venerabili uiro 
Episcopo Sancti Andree prolatum inuenissemus equum rite 
et bona fide prolatum, Inuenimus tamen ecclesiam Dum- 
blanensem per predictum episcopum Sancti Andree in taxa- 
cione redditus Decem marcharum lesam extitisse. Quapropter 
uolentes ea, que legitime acta sunt, in sua firmitate persistere, 
et ea que forte per errorem minus licite facta sunt, ad statum 
debitum reuocare, auctoritate qua fungebamur, in recompensa- 
cionem illius lesionis, abbatem et conuentum nomine monasterij 
de Lun dors, Episcopo Dumblanensi et eius successoribus, 
nomine ecclesie Dumblanensis, in annua prestacione redditus 
Quinque marcarum sentencialiter condempnauimus; arbitrio 
viri venerabilis Episcopi Sancti Andree in suo robore perdu- 
rante. Quod quidem ratum habemus et illud sicut prouide 
factum est, et in instrumento super hoc confecto continetur, 
auctoritate apostolica qua fungebamur confirmauimus. Actum 
apud Lyston xvj. Kal. Maij anno gracie m. cc. xxx. v* ., 
et ut haec nostra sentencia robur perpetue firmitatis obtineat 
huic scripto sigilla nostra apposuimus. 

SENTENCE of the JUDGES DELEGATE by authority of our LORD 
the POPE, on EGLESMAGRIL. 

To all who shall see or hear this writ, William, by the grace of God 
Bishop, Hugh, Dean, and Robert, Treasurer, of Glasgow, health ever- 
lasting in the Lord. We have received a mandate of our Lord the Pope 
in these words : e Gregory, bishop, servant of the servants of God, to 
our venerable brother, the bishop, and to our beloved sons, the dean 
and the treasurer of Glasgow, health and apostolic benediction. We 
have learned on the information of our venerable brother, the Bishop of 
Dunblane, that when a question about the church of Mothel was debated 
between his predecessor, A[braham], of the one part, and the abbot and 
convent of Luridors in the diocese of St. Andrews, of the second part, 
before the Prior of St. Andrews and his colleagues appointed by apostolic 
authority, at length it was agreed by both parties on oath to submit to 
our venerable brother, the Bishop of St. Andrews, as arbiter, who, 
equity being set aside, promulged an unjust judgment to the very great 
injury of the church of Dunblane. Wherefore the same bishop of the 
aforesaid church [Dunblane] has petitioned for the benefit of restitution 
in full. And on this account we by apostolic writ commit to your 
discretion that if ye shall find that the church of Dunblane is very 



54 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

greatly injured by that judgment arbitral, ye shall proceed, as shall be 
just, to effect restitution, and shall cause what ye shall determine upon 
the matter to be strictly observed, under the pain of canonical censure. 
And if the witnesses who shall be named fail to appear through favour, 
hatred, or fear, ye shall compel them by like censure to give testimony 
to the truth, not permitting any appeal on their part. If ye all shall not 
be able to take part in executing this mandate, do thou, nevertheless, 
Brother Bishop, together with one other of those appointed, give execution 
to this mandate. Given at Perugia, iii. Non. November [Nov. 3] in the 
eighth year of our pontificate [1234].' 

On the authority, therefore, of this mandate, after the parties had 
appeared in our presence, and what was put forward on each side had 
been heard, we diligently examined the cause. And although we have 
found that the decree-arbitral pronounced by the venerable man, the 
Bishop of St. Andrews, was just, and pronounced in due form and in 
good faith , yet we have found that the church of Dunblane was injured 
by the aforesaid Bishop of St. Andrews in the estimate of the payment 
of the ten marks. Wherefore wishing that those things which were 
lawfully done should remain firmly established, and that those things 
which perchance through error were not quite lawfully done should be 
recalled to their due state, we, by the authority which we possess, have 
pronounced sentence condemning the abbot and convent of Lundors, as 
representing the monastery of Lundors, to pay annually to the Bishop of 
Dunblane and his successors, as representing the church of Dunblane, 
the sum of five marks, the decree-arbitral of the venerable man, the 
Bishop of St. Andrews, still remaining in force. Which decree-arbitral 
we ratify, and as having been wisely made (as contained in the instru- 
ment dealing with matter) we have confirmed it. Done at Lyston, 
xvi. Kalends of May [April 16] in the year of grace MCCXXXV. And that 
this our sentence may be firmly established we have affixed our seals to 
this writ. 



LI 

Confirmacio Clementis episcopi Dumblanensis 
de Eglesmagril. 

VNIVERSIS Christi fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum peruen- 
erit, Clemens del gracia Dumblanensis Episcopus, eternam in 
domino Salutem : Ea que iudicio uel concordia terminata 
sunt, ne aliquorum improbitate uel astucia in recidiue conten- 
cionis iurgia relabantur, dignum est auctentici scripti per- 
petuare munimine. Ea propter ad vniuersitatem vestram 
uolumus peruenire, nos de assensu cleri nostri diocesis ratam 



CONFIRMATION BY THE BISHOP 55 

habere sentenciam uirorum uenerabilium Domini Willelmi 

Episcopi, Hugonis Decani, et Roberti thesaurarij ecclesie 

Glasguensis, quam auctoritate Domini pape Gregorii Noni tule- 

runt super arbitrio Domini Willelmi Episcopi Sancti Andree, 

quondam prolate super controuersia mota inter A. bone 

memorie, predecessorem nostrum, et abbatem et conuentum de 

lundors super ecclesia de Mothel ; per quod arbitrium causati 

sumus ecclesiam Dumblanensem fuisse lesam : Qui equitate a a MS. equitata. 

pensata arbitrium equum et rite prolatum pronunciaverunt ; 

et excessum factum in taxacione redditus | Decem marcarum [/&/. 49-] 

vnde dictam ecclesiam lesam perpenderunt corrigentes, con- 

dempnauerunt dictos abbatem et monachos, nomine monasterij 

sui, nobis et successoribus nostris, nomine predicte ecclesie 

Dumblanensis, in Quinque marcis argenti annuatim soluendis. 

Quam sentenciam quia in commodum predicte ecclesie nostre 

lata est, acceptamus et Ratam habemus, bona fide, in periculo 

anime nostre et animarum successorum nostrorum, promit- 

tentes quod super predicto arbitrio nullam de cetero moue- 

bimus questionem : set sicut a predecessore nostro susceptum 

est, et in instrumento super hoc confecto plenius expressum, 

et auctoritate Domini pape a iudicibus prenominatis confirma- 

tum, illud sine cauilacione et dolo obseruabimus in perpetuum. 

Et ut hoc futuris temporibus robur firmitatis obtineat, huic 

scripto sigillum nostrum apposuimus ; actum in sinodo nostra 

in ecclesia de Outerardouer coram prelatis et clero nostfe 

diocesis, Non. Maij, anno gracie m. cc. xxx. Quinto. Ego 

Clemens Episcopus consencio et subscribo. Ego R. abbas 

subscribe. Ego J. abbas subscribo. Ego P. abbas subscribo. 

Ego Hugo, abbas de sancto Seruano subscribo. Ego Gilbertus 

archidiaconus Dumblanensis, subscribo. Ego lucas vicarius 

ecclesie de Methel subscribo. Ego Martinus Decanus de 

Menethet subscribo. Ego Henricus subscribo. Ego Mauricius 

prior Keledeorum de Mothel subscribo. Ego Andreas prior 

Keledeorum de Abernethyn subscribo. 

CONFIR3IATION by CLEMENT, BlSHOP of DUNBLANE, of EoLESMAGRIL. 

To all the faithful of Christ to whom the present writ shall come, 
Clement, by the grace of God, Bishop of Dunblane, health everlasting 
in the Lord. 



56 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

It is meet that those things which have been terminated by judicial 
sentence or by agreement should be made lasting by the muniment of 
an authentic writ,, lest, by the dishonesty or craft of any, they might 
relapse into disputes of renewed contention. Wherefore we will that it 
should be known to all of you that we, with the assent of the clergy of our 
diocese, hold as established the sentence of the venerable men, the Lord 
William, Bishop, Hugh, Dean, and Robert, Treasurer, of the church of 
Glasgow, which, by the authority of our Lord, Pope Gregory ix., they 
pronounced upon the decree-arbitral of Lord William, Bishop of St. 
Andrews, formerly pronounced upon the controversy between A[braham], 
of good memory, our predecessor, and the abbot and convent of Lun- 
dors, in respect to the church of Mothel, by which decree-arbitral we 
pleaded that the church of Dunblane had been injured. Who [the 
Bishop, Dean, and Treasurer of Glasgow], taking equity into considera- 
tion, pronounced and duly promulgated a just decree-arbitral, and 
corrected the excess in the estimate of the payment of ten marks by 
reason of which they judged the said church was injured, condemning 
the said abbot and monks, on the part of the monastery, to pay annually 
to us and our successors, as representing the aforesaid church of Dun- 
blane, five silver marks. 1 Which sentence, because it was pronounced 
to the advantage of our church aforesaid, we accept and hold good ; and 
we promise in good faith, on the peril of our soul and of the souls of 
our successors, that in the future we will raise no question as to the 
aforesaid decree-arbitral ; but, as was undertaken by our predecessor, 
and as is more fully expressed in the instrument executed upon this 
matter, and on the authority of our Lord the Pope confirmed by the 
judges aforenamed, we will observe it for all time without cavil. And 
that this in times to come may hold good, we have placed our seal to this 
writ. Done in our synod in the church of Outerardouer, in the presence 
of the prelates and clergy of our diocese, on the Nones [7th] of May, in 
the year of grace, MCCXXXV. 

I, Clement, Bishop, consent and subscribe. I, R., Abbot, subscribe. 
I, J., Abbot, subscribe. I, P., Abbot, subscribe. I, Hugh, Abbot of St. 
Serf, subscribe. I, Gilbert, Archdeacon of Dunblane, subscribe. I, 
Luke, Vicar of the church of Methel, subscribe. I, Martin, Dean 
of Menethet, subscribe. I, Henry, subscribe. I, Maurice, Prior of the 
Keledei of Mothel, subscribe. I, Andrew, Prior of the Keledei of Aber- 
nethyn, subscribe. 



LII 
Confirmacio Cleri Dumblanensis de Eglesmagril. 

VNIVERSIS Christ! fidelibus ad quos presens peruenerit, R. de 
Aberbrothoc, Hugo de sancto seruano, J. de Insula missarum, 

1 Or ' five marks in money' (quinque marcas argenti). 



CONFIRMATION BY THE CLERGY 57 

P. de Ka[m]buskinel, del gracia abbates, G. archidiaconus, et 
uniuersus clerus Dumblanensis diocesis, Salutem in Domino. 
Noueritis nos ratam habere coucordiam quondam prouisam et 
factam inter ecclesiam Dumblanensem et monasterium de 
lundors per arbitrium Domini Willelmi Episcopi Sancti 
Andree super controuersia mota inter partes de ecclesia de 
Mothel. Ipsumque arbitrium prout in autentico continetur 
uerbo ad uerbum, et a domino W. Glasguensi Episcopo et 
suis collegis, auctoritate Domini pape, est declaratum et con- 
firmatum, et a nostro diocesano Domino C. Episcopo Dum- 
blanensi sponte susceptum et obseruatum, communi assensu et 
consilio acceptamus et in perpetuum bona fide obseruandum 
decernimus. Et in huius nostre approbacionis testimonium 
unacum sigillis predictorum abbatum, nomine cleri tocius, 
quia sigillum commune non habemus, sigillum patroni nostri 
Domini R. comitis de Strathern huic scripto apponi 
procurauimus. 

CONFIRMATION by the CLERGY of DUNBLANE, of EGLESMAGRIL. 

To all the faithful of Christ to whom these presents shall come, R. of 
Aberbrothoc, Hugh of St. Serf, J. of Inchaifray, P. of Cambuskinel, by 
the grace of God Abbots, G. Archdeacon, and all the clergy of the 
diocese of Dunblane, health in the Lord. Know ye that we hold as 
ratified the agreement formerly provided and made, between the church 
of Dunblane and the monastery of Lundors, by the decree-arbitral of 
the Lord William, Bishop of St. Andrews, upon the controversy between 
the parties concerning the church of Mothel. And that decree-arbitral 
we accept, and decree that it be in good faith observed for ever, as it is 
contained in the authentic instrument, word for word, and declared and 
confirmed, on the authority of our Lord the Pope, by W. Bishop of 
Glasgow and his colleagues, and as it was of his own accord accepted 
and observed by our diocesan, the Lord C., Bishop of Dunblane. And 
in testimony of our approval we have procured that the seal of our patron 
(patroni nostri), the Sir R., Earl of Strathern, should be attached to 
this writ, in the name of the whole clergy, together with the seals of the 
abbots aforesaid, because we have no common seal. 

LIII 
Confirmacio capituli Dumblanensis de Eglesmagril. 

VNIVERSIS christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris 
capitulum Dunblanense eternam in domino salutem : Nouerit 



58 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

uniuersitas uestra nos ratam et gratam habere sentenciam 
auctoritate Domini Pape latam uiris uenerabilibus Domino 
W. Episcopo, Domino H. decano, et Domino R. Thesaurario 
Glasguensibus, super perpetua pace ordinata inter ecclesiam 
nostram cathedralem ex una parte, et monasterium de lundors 
ex altera, per arbitrium bone memorie W. episcopi sancti 
Andree super ecclesia de Mothel, sicut, in scripto sentenciam 
illam continente, uerbo ad uerbum continetur. Approbamus 
insuper et Ratam habemus amicabilem composicionem de 
assensu nostro factam inter uenerabilem patrem Dominum C. 
Episcopum nostrum nomine ecclesie sue de Mothel, ex parte 
vna, et Dominum J. abbatem et conuentum de lundors nomine 
monasterij sui, ex altera, super decimis de fedale, Beny, et 
Cuncrag, sicut in scripto inter partes confecto plenius con- 
tinetur. Et ut hec perpetue firmitatis robur obtineant, 
maxime cum ad comodum nostre spectant ecclesie, presenti 
scripto commune sigillum nostrum vnanimi assensu apposui- 
[foi. 50.] mus in testimonium. Testibus, Domino C. Episcopo, Domino 
fergus filio comitis, magistro luca archidiacono, Malisio persona 
de Gasc, Gillebaran et Padyn, capellanis. 



CONFIRMATION of EGLESMAGBIL by the CHAPTER of DUNBLANE. 

To all the faithful of Christ who shall see or hear this writ the 
Chapter of Dunblane, health everlasting in the Lord. Let all of you 
know that we hold as ratified and established the sentence pronounced, 
on the authority of our Lord the Pope, by the venerable men, Lord W., 
Bishop, Sir 1 H., Dean, and Sir R., Treasurer, of Glasgow, on the per- 
petual peace established between our cathedral church of the one part 
and the monastery of Lundors of the other, by the decree-arbitral of W. , 
Bishop of St. Andrews, of good memory, on the church of Mothel, as is 
contained, word for word, in the writ containing that sentence. We 
approve, moreover, and hold established the amicable agreement made, 
with our consent, between the venerable father, Lord C., our bishop, in 
the name of his church of Mothel of the one part, and Lord J., the abbot, 
and the convent of Lundors, in name of the monastery, of the other 
part, as to the tithes of Fedale, Beny, and Cuncrag, as is more fully 
contained in the instrument executed between the parties. And that 



1 The word ' dominus ' was applied frequently not only to bishops and abbots, 
but to ecclesiastics of inferior rank. In such cases the vernacular Scots equi- 
valent is often ' schir ' or ' sir. 5 A similar use of ' sir ' will be familiar to readers 
of Shakespeare. 



TITHES OF FEDAL, ETC. 59 

these things may be firmly established for ever, especially since they 
concern the advantage of our church, we have in testimony, with unani- 
mous assent, placed our common seal to this present writ. Witnesses, 
Lord C., Bishop; Sir Fergus, son of the Earl; Master Luke, Arch- 
deacon ; Malise, Parson of Gasc ; Gillebaran and Padyn, chaplains. 



LIV 

Composicio super decimis de fedal, Beny et 
Concragh. 

CVM monasterium de lundors haberet quasdam terras sibi in 
perpetuam elemosinam collatas in parochia de Mothel, scilicet, 
fedale, Beny et Cunecrach, et idem monasterium immune sit a 
prestacione decimarum de noualibus suis et de nutrimentis 
animalium suorum per priuilegium sibi a sede apostolica indul- 
tum, et ecclesia de Mothel ad mensam pertineat Domini 
Dumblanensis episcopi, ne occasione dicti priuilegij ipsam 
ecclesiam contingeret enormiter ledi, mediantibus uiris Dis- 
cretis et juris peritis, inter Dominum Clementem Dumblan- 
ensem episcopum de assensu capituli Dumblanensis, nomine 
ecclesie de Mothel ex una parte, et Dominum Johannem abbatem 
et Conuentum de Lundors nomine monasterij sui ex altera, ita 
est amicabiliter compositum, quod iidem abbas et conuentus in 
perpetuum habebunt omnimodas decimas predictarum terrarum 
quocunque nomine censeantur, a quibuscunque terre ipse fuerint 
inhabitate, liberas et quietas ab omni exaccione et consuetu- 
dine, et persoluent annuatim eidem ecclesie de Mothel sex 
marcas sterlingorum ad duos terminos, scilicet, tres marcas ad 
festum sancti Michaelis, et tres marcas ad pasca. De seculari- 
bus autem in dictis terris manentibus habebit dicta ecclesia 
obuenciones debitas, tarn pro uiuis quam pro defunctis. Et in 
huius rei testimonium perpetuum huic scripto inter partes 
confecto signa partium sunt apposita; signum, scilicet, partis 
unius scripto partis alterius. Testibus, Domino H. abbate de 
insula missarum. Dompno W. Decano Dumblanensi, Domino 
ferguso filio Comitis, magistro luca archidiacono, Dompno 
Adam priore de Abberbrodoc, Domino Andrea priore de 
Abernythyn, magistro Christiano, Gillebaran capellano, Padin 
Presbytero de mothel. Acta in sinodo de Gask crist. vij Idus 
aprilis anno gracie M. cc xxx ix. 



60 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

AGREEMENT concerning the TITHES of PEDALED BENY, and CONCRAG. 

INASMUCH as the monastery of Lundors had certain lands in the parish 
of Mothel, namely, Fedale, Beny, and Concrag, conferred on them in 
perpetual alms, and inasmuch as the same monastery is free from the 
payment of tithes from their fallow-lands and the young of their flocks, 
by reason of a privilege granted to them by the Apostolic See, and inas- 
much as the church of Mothel pertains to the table (ad mensatri) of the 
Lord Bishop of Dunblane, to the end that serious injury might not be 
inflicted on that church by reason of the said privilege, on the interven- 
tion of discreet men, learned in the law, an amicable agreement was 
made between Lord Clement, Bishop of Dunblane, acting with the assent 
of the chapter of Dunblane, on behalf of the church of Mothel, of the 
one part, and the Lord John, the abbot, and convent of Lundors on 
behalf of their monastery, of the other part, to the effect that the same 
abbot and convent shall always have all manner of tithes from the lands 
aforesaid, under whatsoever denomination they are reckoned, by whom- 
soever those lands shall be inhabited, free and exempt from all exaction 
and custom, and they shall pay yearly to the same church of Mothel six 
marks sterling at the two terms, namely, three marks at the feast of St. 
Michael, and three marks at Easter. But from the seculars residing on 
the same lands the said church shall have the due obventions as well for 
the living as the dead. And in perpetual testimony of this thing, to this 
writ, executed between the parties, the seals of the parties are affixed, 
namely the seal of the one party to the writ of the other party. Wit- 
nesses Lord H., Abbot of Inchaffray ; Sir W., Dean of Dunblane; 
Sir Fergus, son of the Earl; Master Luke, Archdeacon; Sir Adam, 
Prior of Aberbrothoc ; Sir Andrew, Prior of Abernethyn ; Master 
Christian ; Gillebaran, Chaplain ; Padin, Presbyter of Mothel. 

Done in the Synod of Gask crist, vij. of the Ides [7th] of April in the 
year of grace MCCXXXIX. 



LV 

De terra resignata quam Willelmus de Brechin 
perambulavit de terra ecclesie de Rathmuriel. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris 
Willelmus de Brechyn, salutem : Sciatis me pro amore dei, 
et anime mee salute dedisse et quietam clamasse deo et 
monasterio de Lundors terrain illam que perambulate fuit de 
terra ecclesie de Rathmuriel ad alteram Rathmuriel que est 
terra mea, et Resignasse pro me et heredibus meis in per- 
petuum totum jus et clamium, quoad nobis posset accidere 



CHURCH LAND OF RATHMURIEL 61 

occasione illius perambulacionis. Et ut terra ilia remaneat 
quieta et libera predicte ecclesie de Rathmuriel per easdem 
diuisas quas habuit ante dictam perambulacionera, Scilicet, 
per altam viam que vadit de vado de vry uersus Lascelyn. Et 
in huius rei testimonium huic scripto sigillum meum apposui. 
Testibus, Dominis Johanne de Haya, Gilberto de Haya, 
Willelmo de Haya de Balcolmi, Willelmo de Haya fratre 
Domini Gilbert! de Haya, Hugone de Beumys, Henrico de 
Dundemor, Johanne Wischard, Michaele de Munchur, Dauid 
de Lochore, militibus meis, et aliis. Apud Lundors, In 
crastino Decollacionis Sancti Johannis Baptiste, anno gracie 
M. cc xl. quinto. 

(Abstract) 

'Op LAND RESIGNED, which WILLIAM of BRECHIN perambulated, 
belonging to the LAND of the CHURCH of RATHMURIEL.' 

WILLIAM of Brechhi declares that ' for the love of God and the weal 
of my soul ' he had given and quitclaimed ' to God and the monastery of 
Lundors that land which was perambulated from the church land of 
Rathmuriel to the other Rathmuriel which is my land,' and that he had 
resigned for ever for himself and his heirs all right and claim which 
could arise by reason of that perambulation. The land was to be free 
and exempt, by the marches which it had before the perambulation, 
namely, by the highway which goes from the ford of Ury towards Lescelyn. 
Seal. Witnesses. At Lundors, on the morrow of the Decollation of St. 
John Baptist [Aug. 29], MCCXLV. 



LVI 
De terra de Ederlarg. 

VNIVERSIS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Simon de 
Garentuly, salutem eternam in domino. Sciatis me dedisse, 
concessisse, et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse Deo et 
ecclesie Sancte marie et Sancti Andree de lundors, et monachis 
ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris totam terram meam 
de Ederlarg per easdem diuisas et cum eisdem asiamentis cum 
quibus ego earn tenui ; Tenendam et habendam sibi in puram | \_f l - 
et perpetuam elemosinam, de me et heredibus meis, sine omni 
seruicio et exaccione seculari, vnde ego et heredes mei illam 
adquietabimus et liberam faciemus, et warentizabimus contra 



62 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

omnes homines. Testibus, Domino Henrico de Boyuille, 
Dauid de Andrea, Malcolmo fratre constabulary, Normanno 
filio Normanni, Jacobo de Vuen, Simone de Boyuille, Simone 
de tendal, ferhare iudice, Thoma filio eius, Ricardo fratre 
meo, Ricardo clerico meo, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract). 
' OF the LAND of EDERLABG/ 

SIMON of Garentuly declares that he gives to God and the monks of 
Lundors l my land of Ederlarg by the same marches and with the same 
easements with which I held it.' To be held in frankalmoign of him 
and his heirs, without any service or secular exaction. Warrandice 
against all men. Witnesses . . . 



LVII 

De tholachkere et de secundis decimis, S. de 
Garentuly. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presentes litteras uisuris uel audi- 
turis, Simon de Garentuly, miles, eternam in domino salutem, 
Nouerit uniuersitas uestra quod cum esset causa mota inter 
uiros religiosos abbatem et conuentum de lundors, ex vna parte, 
et me ex altera, super secundis decimis terre mee de Creymund 
et de edengerroke quam habui ex collacione nobilis uiri 
Comitis Johannis, coram uiris uenerabilibus magistro Abel, 
archidiacono Sancti Andree, et . . . priore de May, in dicta 
causa auctoritate apostolica judicibus delegatis et eorundem 
subdelegatis diucius uentilata : tandem, amicis mediantibus, 
ut omnis discordie et dissensionis mote et mouende usque in 
diem confeccionis presencium litterarum materia omnino et 
Radicitus in perpetuum tolleretur, quam ego uel heredes mei 
habebamus uel aliquo modo habere poteramus ex quacunque 
causa contra predictos abbatem et conuentum, dedi et concessi 
et present! scripto confirmaui eisdem et monasterio suo de 
Lundors, pro dictis secundis decimis, octo solidos Sterlingorum 
annuos predictis abbati et conuentui uel eorum certo actornato, 
singulis annis in perpetuum de me et heredibus meis apud 
domum meam de Creymund ad festum sancti Martini in 
hieme, sine dilacione et cauillacione aliqua petsoluendos ; 



COMMUTATION OF SECOND TITHES 63 

Renuncians omni excepcioni iuris et facti michi competent! uel 
competitive qua posset predicta solucio predictorum solidorum 
aliquatenus impediri uel difFerri. Insuper pro bono pacis, pro 
remedio, et pro salute anime mee et antecessorum meorum et 
heredum meorum, renunciaui pro me et heredibus meis in per- 
petuum omni iuri et clamio quod habebam uel habere poteram, 
uel habere credebam in terra dictorum abbatis et conuentus et 
monasterij de lundors, que uocatur tolaukery, et pertinenciis 
suis ; et predictam terrain cum suis pertinenciis dictis abbati et 
conuentui in perpetuum pro me et heredibus meis quietam 
clamaui : Renuncians in hac parte omni accioni et iuris bene- 
ficio que mihi uel heredibus meis super premissis omnibus 
et singulis possent uel poterint prodesse, et predict is abbati et 
conuentui obesse. Et ad hec omnia et singula sine fraude, 
cauillacione, et malo ingenio firmiter et fideliter in perpetuum 
observanda, pro me et heredibus meis, affidavi. Et ad maiorem 
securitatem et robur perpetue firmitatis presentibus litteris 
sigillum meum apposui. Testibus, Thoma de Perth et Thoma 
de Benuer monachis de Lundors, Ricardo tune vicario de 
fintreth, Michaele Prath, Alano le larderer, laicis, et multis 
aliis. Actum apud fintreth, anno gracie M cc 1 secundo, 
die Jouis proxima post festum sancti Johannis Baptiste. 

(Abstract) 

1 SIMON of GARENTULY concerning THOLACHKERE, and concerning 
SECOND TITHES.' 

SIMON of Garentuly, knight, recounts that litigation had been carried 
on between the abbot and convent of Lundors, of the one part, and him- 
self, of the other part, as to the second tithes of his land of Creymund 
and of Edengerroke (which land he had of the collation of Earl John) 
before the judges delegate in the said cause, by the authority of the 
Apostolic See, namely Master Abel, Archdeacon of St. Andrews and 
. . . Prior of May. The cause was long discussed by the subdelegates 
of the judges delegate. At length, on the intervention of friends, with 
a view to the removal of all cause of dispute, he gives and confirms to 
the monks of Lundors, in lieu of the second tithes, eight shillings to be 
paid annually to the abbot and convent, or their attorney, at his 
[Simon of Garentuly's] house of Creymond, at the feast of St. Martin 
in winter, without cavil or delay. He renounces any right to take ex- 
ception whether of law or of fact that would impede the payment of the 
shillings aforesaid. Moreover, for the good of peace, and for the weal 



64 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

of his soul and of the souls of his ancestors and his heirs, he renounces 
for himself and his heirs for ever ' all right and claim which I had, or 
could have, or was believed to have in the land of the aforesaid abbot 
and convent and monastery of Lundors, which is called Tolaukery, and 
its pertinents/ and quitclaims the said land. He further renounces 
his right to action at law in this respect. And he gives his pledge that 
these things, all and singular, shall be observed firmly and faithfully 
for ever, without fraud, cavil, or evil design. Seal. Witnesses. Done 
at Fintreth, on the second Thursday next after the feast of St. John 
Baptist, 1 MCCL. 

LVIII 
De Capella de Cremond. 

NOTVM sit omnibus hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris quod 
dompnus Johannes abbas et conuentus de lundors concesse- 
runt domino Simoni de Garentuly ut faciat sibi capellam 
intra septa curie sue, ubi ipse et priuata familia sua tantum 
audiant diuinum officium. Ita tamen quod in diebus precipue 
festiuitatis eant ad matricem ecclesiam, et homines de eo 
[/&/. 52.] tenentes more debito ueniant ad matricem ecclesiam. Idem 
autem Simon et heredes sui inuenient de suo omnia necessaria 
predicte capelle, et facient fidelitatem ecclesie de Inuerhuri, 
ipsi et capellani ministrantes in capella; Quod si aliqua 
obuencio ibi facta fuerit integre persoluetur eidem ecclesie et 
quod occasione illius nichil amittet ecclesia. Et si aliter 
fecerint tamdiu suspendetur capella donee plene satisfecerint. 
In recognicionem autem huius concessionis dabunt annuatim 
idem Simon et heredes sui matrici ecclesie duas libras cere ad 
festum assumpcionis beate Marie. In huius rei testimonium 
hoc scriptum est conscriptum. 

OF the CHAPEL of CREMOND. 

BE it known to all who shall see or hear this writ that Lord John, 
the abbot, and the convent of Lundors have granted to Sir Simon of 
Garentuly to make for himself a chapel within the enclosure of his 
court, where he and his private family only may hear divine service. 



1 The feast of St. John the Baptist (i.e. the feast of his Nativity) is June 24th. 
This fell on Friday in the year 1250 ; and therefore the date of the charter is 
7th July 1250. 



PRIVATE CHAPELS 65 

Yet so that on the principal festivals they and the tenants holding- of 
him should come, in the accustomed manner,, to the mother-church. 
The same Simon and his heirs shall at their own cost find all things 
necessary for the aforesaid chapel, and shall do fealty to the church of 
Inverhuri, they themselves and the chaplains ministering in the chapel. 
If there be any ohvention there made, it shall be paid in full to the 
same church, so that by reason of it [the chapel] the church may lose 
nothing-. And if they shall act otherwise the chapel shall be suspended 
until full satisfaction shall have been made. And in recognition of 
this grant the same Simon and his heirs shall give annually to the 
mother-church two pounds of wax at the feast of the Assumption of 
St. Mary [Aug. 15]. In testimony of this thing this writ has been 
drawn up. 

LIX 
De Capella de Weredors. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Bartholomeus 
flandrensis, salutem ; Sciatis me dedisse et hac carta mea 
confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancti Drostani de Inchemabani 
vnum toftum et dims acras terre arabilis iuxta eundem tof- 
tum, in Rauengille uilla mea inter magnam uiam et morum 
uersus Gillandreston, cum communi asiamento eiusdem uille, et 
cum communi pastura ad sex animalia et vnum equum et 
quadraginta oues ; Tenendum et habendum eidem ecclesie 
et rectoribus ipsius de me et heredibus meis ita libere et 
quiete, sine omni consuetudine et exaccione seculari, sicut 
aliqua terra ecclesie liberius tenetur et quiecius : feci eciam 
fidelitatem et per cartam istam oblige me et heredes meos 
quod predicta ecclesia de Inchemabany sine dampno erit nee 
aliquid amittet de iure suo occasione capelle mee, quam feci 
michi et priuate familie mee tantum per licenciam domini 
abbatis et conuentus de lundors, sicut in eorum carta quam 
inde habeo continetur. Testibus, Domino G. episcopo, Domino 
Malcolmo archidiacono Aberdonensi, Normanno constabulario, 
Simone de Garentuly, Henrico de Boyuilla, Simon e filio 
eius, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
OF the CHAPEL of WEREDORS. 

BARTHOLOMEW FLEMING grants to the church of St. Drostan of Inche- 
mabani a toft and two acres of arable land adjoining the toft in his vill 

E 



66 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

of Ravengille between the great road and the moor towards Gilland- 
reston, with the common easement of the same vill, with common 
pasture for six ( animals/ one horse, and forty sheep : to be held of him 
and his heirs by the same church and the rectors of it, as freely, etc. 
. . . He declares that he has given his faith and bound himself and 
his heirs that the church of Inchemabani shall suffer no injury and lose 
none of its rights by reason of his chapel, which he had made by leave 
of the abbot and convent of Lundors (as contained in the charter in 
his possession) for the use of himself and his private family only. 
Witnesses . . . 

LX 

De firma 1 . . . 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Henricus de 
Brechyn, films Comitis Dauid, eternam in domino salutem : 
Sciatis me dedisse, concessisse, et hac presenti carta mea con- 
firmasse, pro salute anime mee, et Juliane sponse mee, et 
Willelmi filij mei, et pro animabus omnium antecessorum et 
successorum meorum deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti 
Andree de lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et 
seruituris, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
viginti solidos sterlingorum annuatim percipiendos de me et 
heredibus meis in perpetuum, ad festum sancti martini, apud 
Brechyn. Volumus autem et concedimus tarn ego quam 
predicta Juliana uxor mea ut ad obitum nostrum corpora 
nostra portentur ad lundors sepelienda, quia ibidem locum 
sepulture nobis elegimus, sicut illi qui recepti sumus in pleno 
capitulo in fraternitatem domus et participacionem omnium 
oracionum et beneficiorum que in ea fient. Et ut hec donacio 
et concessio perpetuam obtineat firmitatem presenti scripto 
sigillum meum apposui. Testibus, Domino G. Brechinensi 
episcopo, Domino Henrico de Striuelin fratre meo, Domino 
Ricardo filio Thome, Willelmo filio meo, Henrico de Edene- 
burg, Willelmo, Waltero, seruientibus meis. 

(Abstract) 
[Title only partially legible.] 

HENRY of Brechin, son of Earl David, grants to Lundors for the weal 
of his soul, and of the soul of Juliana, his spouse and for the souls of 
all his ancestors and successors, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, twenty 

1 The rest of the rubric is illegible. 



HENRY AND WILLIAM OF BRECHIN 67 

shillings sterling, to be received yearly from him and his heirs for ever,, 
on the feast of St. Martin, at Brechin. He and his aforesaid wife, 
Juliana, desire and grant that on their decease their bodies should be 
carried to Lundors there to be buried, ' because there we have chosen a 
place of sepulture, as being persons received, in full chapter, into the 
brotherhood of the house and into participation of all the prayers and 
benefits which are to be had therein. ' In confirmation he seals the writ with 
his seal. ' Witnesses ; the Lord G., Bishop of Brechin ; Sir Henry of 
Stirling, my brother ; Sir Richard, son of Thomas ; William, my son ; 
Henry of Edeneburg ; William and Walter, my servants.' 



LXI 
Confirmacio domini Willelmi de Brechyn * . . . 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel 
audituris Willelmus de Brechyn, eternam salutem in domino. 
Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me concessisse et hac presenti carta 
mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte marie et sancti Andree 
de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris 
ilium annuum redditum xx solidorum quern inclite recorda- 
cionis Henricus pater meus pro salute anime sue et Juliane 
sponse sue, et pro salute anime mee, et successorum suorum 
eisdem pie contulit et concessit in liberam, puram, et perpetuam 
elemosinam, sicut carta ipsius super hoc confecta plenius 
testatur. Assignaui eciam eis predictum annuum redditum 
xx solidorum percipiendum perpetuo de firma mea et heredum 
meorum de Lundors per manus Balliui mei et heredum meorum 
quicunque ibidem pro tempore fuerit, ad duos terminos, vide- 
licet Decem solidos ad festum penthecostes, et Decem solidos 
ad festum sancti martini in hyeme. Et ad maiorem huius 
rei securitatem concessi eisdem quod si in solucione predictorum 
denariorum prenominatis terminis aliquando cessatum fuerit, 
liceat eisdem, elapsa quindena post terminum, non petita ab 
aliquo licencia, sine aliqua calumpnia, cauillacione, uel contra- 
diccione capere namos meos et heredum meorum in predicta 
terra de Lundors, et detinere eosdem non liberandos alicui, uel 
ad uadium uel ad plegium, quousque eisdem de porcione 
termini preteriti plenarie fuerit satisfactum. In huius rei 
testimonium presens scriptum sigilli mei apposicione roboraui. 

1 The rest of the rubric is almost illegible. It is probably ' de xx solidis.' 



68 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Testibus, Dominis Petro de Haya, Roberto de Rossith, et 
Hugone de Beumys, militibus, Magistro Hugone de Striuelyn 
rectore ecclesie de forgrund, Gilberto clerico Rectore ecclesie 
de Adel, Johanne de Kinkel capellano, Laurencio clerico 
Rectore ecclesie de Kinetics, Roberto filio Mabilie, tune 
seruiente meo de Lundors, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' SIR WILLIAM of BBECHIN'S CONFIRMATION. . . . ' 

WILLIAM of Brechin confirms to Lundors the annual payment of 
twenty shillings, which Henry, his father, had granted for the weal of 
his soul and of the soul of Juliana, his spouse, ' and for the weal of my 
soul ' and of his successors, as the charter made by him more fully 
declares. He assigns the payment to be made from his rents (firma) of 
Lundors by the hands of the bailiff, ten shillings at Whitsunday and 
ten shillings at Martinmas. ' And for the greater security of this thing 
I have granted to the same, the monks of Lundors, that if at any time 
the payment of the money aforesaid at the forenamed terms should 
cease, it shall be lawful for them after the lapse of fifteen days from the 
term, without asking leave of any and without charge, cavil, or dispute, 
to take poinds from me and my heirs in the aforesaid land of Lundors, 
and to detain them and not give them up to any on pledge or security, 
until full payment has been made to them for the portion due at the past 
term.' Seal. Witnesses . . . 

LXII 

De Capella domini Willelmi de Brechyn de 
Lundors. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presens scriptum visurisuel audituris 
Willelmus de Brechyn, eternam in Domino Salutem : Nouerit 
vniuersitas uestra nos obligasse nos et heredes nostros ad in- 
ueniendum omnia necessaria cuidam capellano nostro qui in 
capella castri nostri de lundors celebrabit divina, quando nos 
uel heredes nostri uoluerimus quod ibidem diuina celebrentur. 
Dictus autem capellanus canonicam obedienciam faciet matrici 
ecclesie de Ebedyn, et omnes oblaciones ad dictam capellam 
uenientes eidem matrici ecclesie fideliter persoluet. Nos autem 
et heredes nostri dictam capellam quam de uoluntate venera- 
bilis patris Dauid dei gracia episcopi Sancti Andree et assensu 
abbatis et conuentus de Lundors construximus, quociens opus 
fuerit, in omnibus reparabimus. Ita siquidem quod per pre- 



PRIVATE CHAPELS 69 

dictam capellam nullum predicte ecclesie matrici in aliquo stat 
preiudicium. In recognicione autem iuris matricis ecclesie nos 
et heredes nostri dabimus annuatim prefate ecclesie de Ebedyn 
vnam libram thuris infra septimanam penthecostes. In cuius 
rei testimonium sigillum nostrum presentibus litteris apponi 
fecimus. Datum apud Inchemurthach, dominica qua cantatur 
oculi mei, in quadragesima anno gracie m cc xl octauo. 

(Abstract) 
( OF SIB WILLIAM of BRECHIN'S CHAPEL at LUNDORS.' 

WILLIAM of Brechin takes the obligation, for himself and his heirs, to 
find all things necessary for the chaplain who will celebrate divine service 
in the chapel of his castle at Lundors, whenever he or his heirs may 
desire divine service to be celebrated there. But the said chaplain shall 
make canonical obedience to the mother- church of Ebedyn, and will 
faithfully pay to the mother-church all oblations coming to the chapel. 
William and his heirs will in all things repair, whenever there is need, 
the said chapel, which he had built at the will of David, Bishop of 
St. Andrews, and with the assent of the abbot and convent of Lundors, 
so that the chapel should in no way be prejudicial to the mother-church. 
In recognition of the rights of the mother-church he and his heirs will 
annually give to the said church of Ebedyn one pound of incense within 
the week of Whitsunday. Seal. ' Given at Inchemurthach on the 
Sunday in Lent on which is sung Oculi mei, 1 in the year of grace 
MCCXLVIII.' 

LXIII 

Ordinacio Episcopi Sancti Andree super capella 
de Dundemor. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Dauid dei gracia 
episcopus Sancti Andree, eternam in domino salutem. Noueritis 
quod cum mota esset controuersia inter abbatem et conuentum 
de lundors ex ima parte, et Dominum Henricum de Dundemor 
militem, ex altera, super seruicio capelle de Dundemor ; Tandem 
partibus coram nobis constitutis in sinodo nostra celebrata 
apud Perth anno gracie m cc xl octauo, quarto nonas Junij, 
consencientibus eisdem partibus in nos et nostre ordinacioni 
se submittentibus sub hac forma ordinacionis, videlicet [quod 
dicti abbas et conuentus dabunt singulis annis domino Henrico 

1 The Third Sunday in Lent. 



70 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

de Dundemor et heredibus suis viginti et quinque solidos ad 
sustentandum] l vnum capellanum ministrantem in capella de 
Dundemor percipiendos per mamim capellani qui pro tempore 
ministrabit in matrici ecclesia de Ebedyn, ad duos terminos 
anni, scilicet, duodecim solidos et sex denarios ad festum 
Sancti Martini in hyeme, et duodecim solidos et sex denarios 
[/&/. 54.] ac [ Penthe | costen, saluo iure matricis ecclesie de Ebedyn in 
omnibus ; Ita, uidelicet, quod omnes parochiani de Dundemor, 
excepta propria familia domus domini H. de Dundemor et 
heredum suorum, uenient ter in anno ad matricem ecclesiam de 
Ebedyn, scilicet, die Natalis Domini, et die Pasce, et die Sancti 
Andree apostoli, et percipient in matrice ecclesia omnia 
sacramenta sua. Dictus uero H. et heredes sui honeste facient 
deseruiri dicte capelle, et capellano, qui in eadem celebrabit 
diuina, in omnibus necessaria inuenient. Nee unquam de cetero 
aliquid exigent a dictis abbate et conuentu nisi predictos xx et 
v solidos. Capellani uero qui in dicta capella ministrabunt 
iuramentum prestabunt quod fideles erunt matrici ecclesie de 
Ebedyn, et omnes oblaciones que in dicta capella fient eidem 
ecclesie de Ebedyn fideliter persoluent. Dictus uero abbas 
ornatum per visum proborum hominum sufficientem tarn in libris 
quam in uestimentis et calice dicte capelle semel inuenient, et 
dictus H. et heredes sui dictum ornatum sumptibus suis in per- 
petuum sustentabunt. Et ad hec fideliter obseruanda, dictus 
abbas pro se et conuentu, et dictus Henricus pro se et heredibus 
suis in manu magistri Andree de Aberdon, tune officialis Sancti 
Andree, affidauerunt. Nos, uero, ad maioris roboris firmitatem, 
predictam ordinationem in modum cirographi confectam, 
Cuius ordinacionis una pars penes abbatem et conuentum, alia 
penes Henricum et heredes suos residet, sigilli nostri munimine, 
vna cum sigillorum Domini A. archidiaconi Sancti Andree, et 
magistri A. de Aberden, Officialis nostri, et parcium apposicione 
communimus. 

(Abstract) 
' ORDINANCE of the BISHOP of ST. ANDREWS on the CHAPEL of 

DUNDEMOR.' 

DAVID by the grace of God Bishop of St. Andrews to all,, etc. He 
recounts that there had been a controversy between the abbot and con- 

1 The words in brackets are almost illegible, and are partly supplied 
conjecturally. 



THE CHAPEL OF DUNDEMOR 71 

vent of Lundors, of the one part, and Sir Henry of Dundemor, of 
the other, concerning the service of the chapel of Dundemor. At 
length the parties appeared before the bishop in his synod at Perth 
on the fourth of the Nones of June [June 2] in the year of grace 
MCCXLVIII., and by consent submitted themselves to his determination 
of the dispute, which determination took the form of the following 
ordinance : The abbot and convent will every year give five and twenty 
shillings to Sir Henry and his heirs for the maintenance of a chaplain 
ministering in the chapel of Dundemor. This money was to be paid 
through the hand of the chaplain, for the time being, of the mother- 
church of Ebedyn, at the two terms of the year : twelve shillings and 
six pence at the feast of St. Martin in winter, and twelve shillings and 
six pence at Whitsunday, saving the rights of the mother-church of 
Ebedyn in all things. Thus, all the parishioners of Dundemor, except 
the family of the house of Sir Henry and his heirs, were to go to the 
mother-church of Ebedyn three times a year, namely, on Christmas 
Day, Easter Day, and the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, and in the 
mother-church they were to receive all their sacraments. The said 
Henry and his heirs were to cause the chapel to be decently (honeste) 
served, and were to find all things necessary for the chaplain who would 
celebrate service there. For the future Henry and his heirs were not to 
demand anything from the abbot and convent except the five and twenty 
shillings aforesaid. The chaplains ministering in the chapel were to 
take an oath that they would be faithful to the mother-church of Ebedyn, 
and would faithfully pay to the mother-church all the oblations made in 
the chapel. The abbot and convent were in the first instance to provide 
for the chapel sufficient furnishing (ornatus), ' at the sight of good men,' 
both in books, vestments, and chalice, and Henry and his heirs were 
ever after at their own expense to maintain the furnishing. That they 
would faithfully observe this ordinance, the abbot, for himself and his 
convent, and Henry, for himself and his heirs, pledged themselves ' in 
the hand of Master Andrew of Aberdeen, then Official of St. Andrews.' 
The ordinance of the Bishop of St. Andrews was written in the form of 
an indenture (in modum cirographi), one part of which was to be kept by 
Henry and his heirs, and the other part by the abbot and convent. It 
was sealed with the seals of the bishop, of A., Archdeacon of St. Andrews, 
and of Master A. of Aberdeen, the Official of St. Andrews, and with the 
seals of the parties. 

LXIV 

Ornamenta capelle de Dundemor. 

MEMORANDVM quod die dominica proxima post festum Sancti 
Johannis ante portam latinam anni gracie m 1 cc 1 I 1 tercij apud 
Ebedyn recepit Dominus Johannes de Dundemor, miles, Calicem 
argenteum et vnum missale in quo continetur psalterium. 



72 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ympnarium, legenda, et antiphonarium, et gradale, et totum 
plenarium seruicium tocius anni, et uestimentum plenarium ad 
missam celebrandam, coram Magistro Adam de Malkarueston, 
Domino Willelmo de Balcolmy, Mauricio de Abernythyn 
senescaldo, Ricardo Palmero de Kingore, et Thoma capellano 
de Dunbulg, Johanne capellano de Cullessy, Thoma capellano 
de Ebedyn, et multis aliis. In cuius rei testimonium magister 
Adam de Malkarueston, ad instanciam predict! Domini 
Johannis, huic scripto sigillum suum apposuit. 

(Abstract) 

MEMORANDUM : On Sunday next after the feast of St. John before 
the Latin Gate [May 6], MCCLIII., at Ebedyn, John de Dundemor, 
knight, received a silver chalice, and a Missal in which were contained 
Psalter, Hymuary, Legenda, Antiphonary, and Gradual, and the whole 
full service for the entire year, also a complete vestment for celebrating 
mass ; in the presence of ... In testimony of which Master Adam of 
Malkarueston, at the instance of Sir John, put his seal to this writ. 



LXV 
De tofto in Munorgrund. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit Magnus de 
Morgrund, salutem : Noueritis me dedisse et hac present! carta 
mea confirmasse monasterio de Lundors et monachis ibidem 
deo seruientibus et seruituris unum toftum et unam acram 
terre que iacet proxima terre domini Henrici de Striuelyn in 
Monorgrund : Tenendum sib! de me et heredibus meis, in 
liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, sine omni seruicio 
et consuetudine et exaccione secular!. Vnde ego et heredes 
mei ipsam terrain in perpetuum adquietabimus et waranti- 
zabimus contra omnes homines. Testibus, domino Henrico de 
Striuelyn, Nicholao de Inverpefrin, Michaele de Muncur, 
Roberto de Fodinrey, Gilberto et Randolfo de Polgauelyn, 
Adam homine meo, et multis aliis. 

(Attract) 
' OF a TOFT in MUNORGRUND.' 

MAGNUS DE MORGRUND gives and confirms to the monastery of Lundors 
a toft and an acre of land which lies next the land of Sir Henry of 



GRANTS OF TOFTS 73 

Stirling, in Monorgrund. To be held of Magnus and his heirs in free, 
pure, and perpetual alms, without any service, custom, and secular 
exaction. Warrandice against all men. Witnesses . . . 



LXVI 

De tofto theodorici quondam tinctoris de Perth. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Johannes de Haya 
et uxor eius Juliana, Salutem. Sciatis nos, pro animabus nostris 
et liberorum nostrorum et pro animabus antecessorum et 
successorum nostrorum, Dedisse et concessisse et hac present! 
carta nostra confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti 
Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, in 
puram et perpetuam | elemosinam omne ius quod habemus uel [/<?/. 55.] 
habere poterimus in tofto illo quern Alanus de Lasceles 
uendidit Teoderico tinctori de Perth : Tenendum sibi de nobis 
t heredibus nostris in perpetuum. Quare uolumus ut predicti 
monachi habeant et possideant predictum a ius prefati tofti ita * 
libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia in toto 
regno Scocie aliquod ius in aliquo tofto liberius, quiecius, 
plenius, et honorificencius tenet aut possidet. Et ut donacio 
nostra rata et illibata permaneat sigillorum nostrorum muni- 
mine corroborauimus. Hiis testibus, Domino Dauid de Haya, 
Roberto fratre eius, Simone de Camera, Serlo talliatore, 
Henrico filio Galfridi, Arnaldo tinctore, Roberto et Patricio 
de insula, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' OF the toft of THEODOBIC, late dyer of PERTH. ' 

JOHN DE HAYA and his wife, Juliana, grant to Lundors, for the souls of 
themselves, their children, their ancestors and successors, in free and 
perpetual alms, all right which they had in the toft which Alan de 
Lasceles sold to Theodoric, the dyer of Perth ; to be held as freely, etc. 
Their seals attached. Witnesses . . . 

LXVII 
De celario de Perth. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit, Ricardus de 
Leycestre, salutem. Sciatis me dedisse et concessisse, et hac 



74 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

present! carta mea confirmasse, deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie et 
Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus 
et seruituris, celarium meum in Perth, quod est sub domo que 
quondam fuit Johannis Norreys : Tenendum et habendum sibi 
post mortem meam, in liberam et perpetuam elemosinam, saluo 
seruicio Domini Regis. Ego autem Ricardus eisdem monachis 
annuatim sex denarios de eodem celario ad festum Sancti 
Johannis Baptiste in uita mea persoluam, et de dicto celario 
predictis monachis plenam feci saisinam. Et ad maiorem 
securitatem huic scripto sigillum commune de Perth vnacum 
sigillo meo feci apponi. Testibus, Henrico filio Galfridi, 
Johanne de la batayle, Osberto Redberd, Johanne filio leue, 
Michaele filio serlonis, Johanne Cokyn, Waltero filio Roberti 
de Perth, et Roberto fratre eius, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' OF a CELLAR in PERTH. ' 

RICHARD DE LEYCESTRE grants to Lundors his cellar in Perth which was 
under the house of the late John Norreys, to be held after the death of 
Richard in free and perpetual alms, saving- the service of the king. 
During his life Richard will pay yearly to the monks of Lundors six 
pence out of the said cellar at the feast of St. John the Baptist [June 
24] and e to the aforesaid monks I have made full sasine of the said 
cellar. And for greater security I have caused the common seal of 
Perth to be put to this writ, together with my seal.' Witnesses . . . 



LXVIII 
[De Terra in Forgrund.] 1 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Rogerus de 
Berkeley, salutem in domino. Sciatis me dedisse, concessisse, 
et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse, deo et monasterio 
Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem 
deo seruientibus et seruituris pro salute anime mee, et Mar- 
garete uxoris mee, et animarum omnium antecessorum et 
successorum meorum, vnam bouatam terre in manerio meo de 
forgrund, scilicet, totam terram illam quam habui ad partem 
meam de terra que quondam fuit in contencione inter forgrunt 
et Eglesmagrille pro ix acris, et quatuor acras que iacent pro- 

1 Rubric illegible. 



GRANTS BY ROGER DE BERKELEY 75 

pinquiores illis uersus aquilonern : Tenendam sibi de me et here- 
dibus meis in puram et perpetuam elemosinam, liberam et 
quietam ab omni seruicio et omni consuetudine et omni exaccione 
seculari. Vnde ego et heredes mei predictam terrain adquieta- 
bimus et warentizabimus contra omnes homines. Testibus, 
Domino Henrico de Striuelyn, Domino Reginaldo de Warenne, 
Domino Adam Oliphard, Domino Alexandro de Striuelin, 
Archebaldo fratre eius, Radulfo senescaldo meo, Postoyle, 
maro meo, Alwino seruiente meo, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

[' OF LAND in FORGRUND. '] 

ROGER DE BERKELEY grants to Lundors, for the weal of his soul and 
of the soul of Margaret, his wife, and the souls of his ancestors and 
successors, one oxgate of land in his manor of Forgrund, namely the 
whole of the land which he had at that part of his land which was 
formerly in dispute between Forgrund and Eglesmagrille, 'for nine 
acres,' and four acres which lie next them towards the north. To 
be held of him and his heirs in frankalmoign. He grants warrandice 
against all men. Witnesses . . . 

LXIX 

De dimidia petra cere firmitatis Roger! de Berkeley. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris Rogerus de 
Berkeley, salutem in domino. Noueritis me diuine pietatis 
intuitu dedisse, concessisse et hac present! carta mea confirmasse 
deo et abbacie de Lundors vnam dimidiam petram cere in per- 
petuum annuatim percipiendam de firma terre quam Robertus 
Herneys de me tenuit in forgrund : et predictam ceram 
recipient annuatim de me et heredibus meis ad assumpcionem 
beate Marie, in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosinam. 
Hiis testibus, Domino Patricio vicario de forgrund, Hugone, 
Doven | aldo, Waltero filiis meis, Radulpho senescaldo, Poys- \.f l > 
toyl maro meo, Alewin seruiente meo, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract.) 

' OF HALF a STONE of WAX [ . . . ] * of ROGER de BERKELEY.' 
ROGER DE BERKELEY grants to Lundors a half stone of wax to be received 
yearly out of the rent of the land which Robert Herneys held of him 

1 In the Notes and Illustrations will be found a discussion of the sense of the 
word firmitatiS) which seems to be the reading of the text of tbe MS. 



76 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

in Forgrund, to be delivered as free, pure, and perpetual alms at the 
Assumption of Blessed Mary [Aug. 15]. Witnesses . . . 



LXX 

De Warenna. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit, 
Reginaldus de Warenna, Salutem in domino. Nouerit vniuer- 
sitas vestra me quietum clamasse pro me et heredibus meis 
omne ius quod habui uel habere potui in uilla de Eglesmagril, 
deo et ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de lundors et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris, pro dimidia 
marca argenti quam dominus Abraham episcopus Dumblanensis 
et ems successores michi et heredibus meis ad duos terminos 
soluent annuatim de camera sua, medietatem, scilicet, ad 
penthecosten, et medietatem ad festum sancti martini. Ego, 
eciam, pro me et heredibus meis firmiter promisi, et me et 
heredes meos presenti carta obligaui quod Domino abbati 
et conuentui de Lundors nullam de predicta terra inferam 
molestiam aliquando, licet predictum Episcopum uel successores 
eius in solucione predicte dimidie marce cessare contingeret. 
Hiis testibus, Domino W. episcopo Sancti Andree, Laurencio 
eius archidiacono, Gilberto archidiacono Dumblanensi, Wil- 
lelmo decano de Perth, Edwardo capellano Episcopi Sancti 
Andree, magistris Michaele et Ricardo eiusdem episcopi 
clericis, Willelmo de Golin, Adam fratre Reginaldi de 
Warenna, Henrico de Wincestre, cum multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
f DE WARRENNE.' 

REGINALD DE WARRENNE quitclaims to Lundors all right which he had 
in the vill of Eglesmagril, in return for a half mark of silver, which 
Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane, and his successors should pay to him and 
his heirs from their treasury (camera), half at Whitsunday and half 
at the feast of St. Martin. He promises for himself and his heirs, and, 
by the present charter, obliges himself and his heirs that he will give 
no trouble to the abbot and convent in regard to the land aforesaid, 
although it might happen that the payment of the half mark was not 
made by the bishop and his successors. Witnesses . . . 



GRANTS BY REGINALD DE WARRENNE 77 

LXXI 

Warenna de tribus acris iuxta Eglesmagrill. 

OMNIBVS ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit, R. de Warrene, 
salutem in domino. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra, Adam nepotem 
meum de uoluntate et consilio omnium parentum et amicorum 
suorum, Dedisse et concessisse deo et ecclesie sancte marie et 
sancti andree de Lundors, et monachis eiusdem loci, tres acras 
terre arabilis mensuratas, proximas terre illi quam dedi 
eisdem monachis versus aquilonem : Tenendas sibi in per- 
petuum, in liberam et puram elemosinam, de ipso A. et heredi- 
bus suis libere et quiete ab omnibus -seruiciis et consuetudini- 
bus, et exaccionibus secularibus. Et quoniam ipse A. sigillum 
non habuit, ad peticionem suam et suorum predictas tres 
acras terre predictis monachis sicut dominus principalis con- 
firmaui; Ita quod ego et heredes mei predictam terram eis 
contra Dominum Regem, et contra omnes homines in omnibus 
auxiliis et seruiciis adquietabimus et warentizabimus per illas 
diuisas que facte sunt coram me et aliis probis hominibus, 
scilicet, Hugone Sax, Patricio persona de Eglesmagril, Adam 
et Thoma fratre eius de Pethkathilin, Dauid fratre predict! 
ade nepotis mei, Johanne nepote ipsitis, et Roberto Herneys 
de forgrund, et pluribus aliis probis hominibus, scilicet, sicut 
torrens aque currit inter terram meam et ipsorum mona- 
chorum. Et in huius donacionis et confirmacionis testimonium 
present! carte sigillum meum apposui. Testibus predictis 
probis hominibus, et aliis multis. 

Ista carta duplata est. 

(Abstract) 
' WARENNE, of three acres near EGLESMAGRIL.' 

R. DE WARENNE makes known that his nephew Adam, with the consent 
and advice of all his relations and friends, had given to Lundors three 
measured acres of arable land next to that land which he [R. de Warenne] 
gave to Lundors towards the north, to be held of Adam and his heirs in 
frankalmoign, free from all service, custom, and exaction. ' And since 
Adam himself has no seal, at the petition of him and his relations, 
I as lord-in-chief (dominus principalis) have confirmed to the aforesaid 
monks the aforesaid three acres of land/ R. de Warenne and his heirs 



78 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

will answer for all the aids and services due from the said land according 
to the marches which were assigned in the presence of him and other 
good men, and grants warrandice ' against the king and all men.' The 
names of the ' good men ' in the presence of whom the marches were 
fixed are given. He affixes his seal. Witnesses, the ' good men ' already 
named, ' and many others. ' 
This charter is doubled. 



LXXII 
De Warenna. 

VNIVERSIS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus, ad quos 
presens scriptum peruenerit, Reginaldus de Warenna, Salu- 
tem : Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me dedisse, concessisse, 
et hac present! carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie 
sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors et monachis 
ibidem deo serai en tibus, in liberam et puram et perpetuam 
elemosinam, pro salute anime patris mei et matris mee, et pro 
salute anime mee et uxoris mee, et omnium antecessorum et 
successorum meorum, to tarn terram illam que mea fuit que 
iacet inter duos riuulos, scilicet, inter ilium riuulum qui 
currit inter Eglesmagril et Dunbernyn uersus occidentalem 
plagam ex una parte et inter alium riuulum qui currit 
inter Eglesmagril et petcathelin uersus orientalem plagam 
ex alia parte. Quare uolo et concede ut predicti mon- 
achi totam terram predictam ita libere et quiete, plenarie 
et honorifice, sine omni seruicio et auxilio et consue- 
[fol. 57.} tudine, et exaccione seculari, iure | perpetuo habeant et possi- 
deant sicut aliqua abbacia uel aliqua domus religionis in toto 
regno Scocie aliquam terram uel aliquam elemosinam liberius, 
quiecius, plenius, et honorificencius habet et possidet. Hanc 
autem terram prefato monasterio de lundors et monachis 
ibidem deo seruien tibus ita libere et quiete in perpetuum 
possidendam dedi et concessi, et hac carta mea confirmaui, ut 
nulhis heredum meorum uel successorum aliquid ab eis preter 
oraciones presumat exigere. Hiis testibus, Ada et Rogero, 
fratribus meis, Hugone Sax, W. Decano, Ada persona de 
forgrund, W. de Berkeley, Ada de petcathelin, et T. fratre 
eius, W. preposito nostro. 



CONAN, SON OF THE EARL OF ATHOLL 79 

(Abstract) 
' DE WARENNE. ' 

REGINALD DE WARENNE gives to Lundores for the weal of the souls of his 
father and mother, himself and his wife, his ancestors and successors, in 
frankalmoign, all his land which lay between the two burns, namely, 
between the burn which runs between Eglesmagril and Dunbernyn 
towards the west, on the one side, and the burn which runs between 
Eglesmagril and Petcathelin towards the east, on the other side. It 
was to be held as freely, etc., as any abbey or house of religion in the 
kingdom of Scotland had or possessed any land or any alms, etc. None 
of his heirs or successors were to presume to require anything from the 
monks except their prayers. Witnesses . . . 

LXXIII 
Conan de Bosco. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Conanus films 
henrici quondam Comitis de Athoyle, Salutem. Sciatis me de- 
disse, concessisse, et hac present! carta mea confirmasse deo et 
abbacie de Lundors et Domino Johanni tune abbati, et monachis 
ipsius abbacie deo seruientibus et seruituris, pro salute anime mee 
et uxoris mee, et puerorum meorum, et omnium antecessorum 
et successorum meorum, lignum siccum quod dicitur mortuum 
boscum ad ardendum quantum uoluerint, et ligna que dicuntur 
Wrawes de bule et de auhne, quantum opus habuerint: Et 
centum tractus uirgarum de corilo ad trahas suas faciendas, et 
centum longas uirgas ad circulos faciendos ; Capiendas annua- 
tim de Bosco meo Tulyhen, vbi melius et propius eis fuerit, et 
habenda sibi et successoribus suis de me et heredibus meis in 
perpetuum, et unum messuagium in terra mea ubi manere 
possint homines illorum qui predicta ligna secabunt, et ad 
aquam trahent, cum pastura ad v. uaccas et ad unum equum, 
in puram liberam et perpetuam elemosinam, scilicet, vbicunque 
uacce mee pascunt, sine omni exaccione seruicio et demanda 
seculari. Et ego et heredes mei warentizabimus eis predictam 
elemosinam in perpetuum. Testibus, Dominis colino de 
Lundyn, Radulfo de Fefwerel, militibus, Johanne de Hastinges, 
Evvyn filio meo, Hath filio Gilbrid genero meo, Madith de 
Clonyn, Johanne de Klogestoun, Michaele de Galewath, 
Roberto filio Ylyf, et aliis. 



80 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



(Abstract) 

' CONAN, Of WOOd.' 

CONAN, son of Henry, late Earl of Atholl, grants to Lundors and to 
Lord John, then abbot, and the monks, for the weal of the souls of him- 
self, his wife, his children, his ancestors and successors, dry timber 
(lignum siccum), which is called dead wood (mortuum boscum), for fuel, as 
much as they need, and the wood which is called ' wrawes of bule and of 
auhne/ also one hundred loads (tractus) of hazel rods for making their 
sleds (trahas), and one hundred long rods for making hoops ( ? circulos), 
to be taken yearly from his wood of Tulyhen, where it shall be best and 
nearest to them, and also one house (messuagium) on his land where the 
men of the monks may stay who will cut the aforesaid wood and draw it 
to the water, with pasture for five cows and one horse, in pure and 
perpetual alms, wherever his cows were pastured, free of all service, etc. 
He and his heirs grant warrandice. Witnesses . . . 



LXXIV 

Kinespinedyn de terra in Perth. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris Malcolmus de 
Kinspinithin et Margeria uxor eius, Salutem in domino. 
Noueritis nos de assensu et uoluntate Willelmi filij nostri 
primogeniti dedisse, concessisse, et hac present! carta nostra 
confirmasse Deo et ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree 
de Lundors et monachis ibidem Deo Seruientibus, terciam 
partem tofti illius in Perth, quod quondam fuit Willelmi filij 
Lambyn, proximum tofto Johannis filii Leue, cum omni iure 
quod in ea habuimus uel habere potuimus sine aliquo retine- 
mento. Et ut hec nostra Donacio stabilis sit in perpetuum 
huic scripto sigilla nostra apposuimus. Testibus, Domino Elya 
Decano de Perth, Johanne de Dunbernyn capellano, Arnaldo 
rupe, Alexandra Wife, Willelmo filio nostro, Michaele seruiente 
nostro. 

(Abstract) 
' KINESPINEDYN, of land in PERTH.' 

MALCOLM of Kinspinithin and Margery, his wife, with the will and 
assent of William, their eldest son, grant to Lundors a third part of that 
toft in Perth which formerly belonged to William, son of Lambyn, next 
the toft of John, son of Leve, with all the right which they had or could 



GRANTS OF DRIED HERRING 81 

have in it, without any reservation. The seals of Malcolm and his wife 
are affixed. Witnesses . . . 

LXXV 

Willelmus de Munford de sicco alleci. 

VNIVERSIS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis, Willelmus de Muntfort, 
salutem. Sciant omnes tarn poster! quam presentes, me 
dedisse et concessisse, et hac carta mea confirmasse deo et 
ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors et monachis 
ibidem deo seruientibus, in liberam et puram et perpetuam 
elemosinam, vnum dimidium miliarium de sicco allec singulis 
annis inperpetuum : quod ego et heredes mei reddemus ipsis 
monachis in perpetuum singulis annis ad purificacionem sancte 
marie, ad Karel de mea carucata terre in Karel. Quare uolo et 
concede ut predict! monachi predictam elemosinam ita libere 
et quiete habeant et possideant in perpetuum, sicut aliquam 
aliam elemosinam in regno Scocie liberius et quiecius habent et 
possident. | Testibus, Willelmo persona de Aberden, Matheo [/<?/. 58.] 
clerico fratre eius, Philippo clerico Comitis Dauid, Walkelino 
filio Stephani, Malcolmo filio Bartolfi, Willelmo Wascelyn, 
Gilberto filio Gocelin, Willelmo filio Hugonis, Henrico de 
tindale, Dauid de furthrit. 

(Abstract) 
' WILLIAM DE MUNFORD, of DRIED HERRING. ' 

WILLIAM DE MUNFORD grants to Lundors, in free, pure, and perpetual 
alms, five hundred-weight of dried herring every year, to be rendered by 
him and his heirs annually at the feast of the Purification of St. Mary 
[Feb. 2], at Karel, from his ploughgate of land at Karel. Witnesses . . . 

LXXVI 
De piscaria de Glasbani et Rugesablyn. 

OMNIBVS Sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus presentibus 
et futuris, Dauid de Haya, Salutem : Sciatis me dedisse et con- 
cessisse et hac carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte 
marie et sancti andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo 
seruientibus, in perpetuam et puram elemosinam, pro salute 

F 



82 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

anime patris mei et matris mee, et pro salute anime mee et pro 
salute animarum uxorum mearum Ethne et Eue, et pro salute 
animarum fratrum et sororum mearum, antecessorum et suc- 
cessorum meorum, terciam partem piscarie recium meorum 
trahencium super sabulum de Glesbanin, et terciam partem 
piscarie recium meorum trahencium super rugesablun contra 
Colcric, saluis piscariis meis stantibus cum palo et sepi. 
Quare, uolo et concedo ut predicti monachi de Lundors habeant 
et possideant terciam partem prenominate piscarie recium 
meorum trahencium super sabulum de Glesbanyn, et terciam 
partem predicte piscarie recium meorum trahencium super 
Rugesablun contra Colcric, in perpetuam et puram elemosinam, 
ita libere, et quiete, plenarie, et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia 
in toto regno Scocie aliquam elemosinam liberius, quiecius, 
plenius, et honorificencius tenet et possidet. Ita ut michi suc- 
cedencium nullus aliquid ab eis nisi solas oraciones ad anime 
salutem exigere presumat. Hiis testibus, Gilberto filio meo, 
Roberto de Haya fratre meo, Malcolmo de Haya fratre meo, 
Thoma Gigan, Patricio capellano, Baldewino de Lornyn, Ada 
Walensi tune temporis senescallo, Oliuero de Graham, et 
multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' OF the FISHERY of GLASBANI and RUGESABLYN.' 

DAVID DE HAYA grants to Lundors in pure and perpetual alms, for the 
weal of the souls of his father and mother, and for the weal of his soul 
and of the souls of his wives, Ethna and Eva, and for the weal of the 
souls of his brothers and sisters, and of his ancestors and successors, a 
third part of his draw-net fishery on the sands of Glesbanin and a third 
part of his draw-net fishery at Rugesablyn, opposite Colcric. His fishery 
of stake nets was excepted from the grant. Witnesses . . . 



LXXVII 
De decima piscarie de Glasbani et de Rugesablun. 

OMNIBVS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus, presentibus et 
futuris, Robertus de Haya et Malcolmus frater eius, salutem : 
Sciatis nos dedisse et concessisse et hac carta nostra confirmasse 
deo et ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors, et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, pro salute animarum nos- 



GRANTS BY THE HAYS OF ERROL 83 

trarum et pro salute animarum antecessorum nostrorum, in 
puram elemosinam, totam decimam recium ipsorum mona- 
chorum trahencium super sabulum de Glesbanin, et super 
sabulum de Rugesablun contra colcric, que ex dono domini 
Dauid fratris nostri tenent et possident, sicut carta ipsius 
Dauid testatur ; Reddendo nobis inde annuatim duos salmones 
ad festum, scilicet, sancti Johannis Baptiste. Quare uolumus 
ut predict! monachi teneant et possideant predictam decimam 
recium ipsorum trahencium super prenominata sabula ita 
libere et quiete, ut nullus ex nostris in uita nostra nisi solas 
oraciones ab eis aliquid exigere presumat. Hiis testibus, 
Domino Dauid de Haya, Gilberto filio ipsius, Dauid, Thoma 
Gygan, Patricio capellano, Baldewino de Lornyn, Ada Walensi, 
Oliuero de Graham, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
f OF the TITHE of the FISHERY of GLASBANI and of RUGESABLUN.' 

ROBERT DE HAYA and Malcolm, his brother, grant to Lundors, for the 
weal of their souls, and for the weal of the souls of their ancestors, 
in pure alms, a whole tithe of the monks' draw-nets on the sands of 
Glesbanin and on the sands of Rugesablun, over against Colcric, which 
the monks hold and possess by the gift of David, their brother. The 
monks were to hold the tithe aforesaid on rendering to Robert and 
Malcolm two salmons at the feast of St. John the Baptist [June 24]. 
During their lifetime, neither of them would exact anything from the 
monks, save only their prayers. Witnesses . . . 



LXXVIII 
De tercia parte piscarie. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel audi- 
turis, Gilbertus de Haya, eternam in domino Salutem. Nouerit 
vniuersitas vestra me concessisse et presenti carta mea con- 
firmasse deo et ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de 
Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris, 
donacionem illam quam bone memorie Dauid de Haya, pater 
meus, eis dedit, videlicet, terciam partem piscarie recium 
trahencium super sabulum de Glesbanyn, et terciam partem 
piscarie recium trahencium super Rugesablun contra colcric. 
Dedi et concessi et presenti carta mea confirmaui deo et dicte 



84 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de lundors et monachis 
eiusdem monasterij deo seruientibus et seruituris pro salute 
anime dicti Dauid patris mei, et matris mee, et pro salute 
[/&/. 59.} anime mee,et anime Edoyne uxoris mee, et pro salute | anima- 
rum omnium f rat rum et sororum, antecessorum et successorum 
meorum totam terciam partem piscarie recium meorum trahen- 
cium super Joymersandes, in puram liberam et perpetuam 
elemosinam. Quare uolo et concede ut predicti monachi de 
lundors teneant et possideant omnia prenominata de me et 
heredibus meis, ita libere et quiete, plenarie et honorifice in 
omnibus, sicut aliqua abbacia in toto regno scocie aliquam 
elemosinam liberius, quiecius, plenius et honorificencius tenet 
et possidet; Ita, uidelicet, ut michi succedencium nullus 
aliquid ab eis nisi solas oraciones ad anime salutem exigere 
audeat uel presumat. In cuius rei testimonium presenti 
scripto sigillum meum apposui. Hiis testibus, Dominis Rogero 
de Berkeley, Ricardo Cumyn filio Ricardi Cumyn, militibus, 
Nicholao filio meo, Willelmo tune capellano meo, Roberto de 
Haya nepote meo, Malisio de Strathern consanguineo meo, 
Galfrido de Keldelech, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
( OF the THIRD PART of the FISHERY.' 

GILBKRT DE HAYA confirms to Lundors the donation which David de 
Haya, his father, had made to the monks, namely, a third part of 
the fishery of his draw-nets on the sands of Glesbanyn and on the sands 
of Rugesablun, over against Colcric. He also grants to Lundors, for 
the weal of the souls of David, his father, and his mother, and of himself 
and his wife, Edoyna, and for the weal of the souls of all his brothers 
and sisters, ancestors and successors, a third part of his draw-net fishery 
at Joymersandes, in free, pure, and perpetual alms. He promises that 
none of his successors should demand anything of the monks but 
prayers only. His seal attached. Witnesses . . . 

LXXIX 
De decima recium. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presentes litteras uisuris uel audi- 
turis, Dauid de Haya, Rector ecclesie de Erole, eternam in 
domino salutem. Noueritis me, predecessorum meorum Roberti 
de Haya et Malcolmi fratris eius, quondam Rectorum ecclesie 



GRANT BY ALAN DURWARD 85 

de Erole, uestigiis inherentem, concessisse et present! carta mea 
confirmasse donacionem illam quam ipsi fecerunt abbati et 
conuentui de Lundors, videlicet, de decima recium ipsorum 
monachorum trahencium super sabulum de Glesbanyn et 
super Rugesablun contra Colcrike. Dedi eciam eisdem abbati 
et conuentui decimam recium ipsorum trahencium super 
Joymersandes : Tenendas et habendas eisdem in tota uita 
mea ; Reddendo inde annuatim michi uel actornato meo duos 
salmones ad Natiuitatem sancti Johannis Baptiste. In cuius 
rei testimonium presenti scripto sigillum meum apposui. 

(Abstract} 
c OF the TITHE of NETS.' 

DAVID DE HAYA, rector of the church of Erole, declares that follow- 
ing the example of Robert de Haya and Malcolm, his brother, formerly 
rectors of the church of Erole, he confirms the grant which they had 
made to Lundors of the tithe of the monks' draw-nets on the sands of 
Glesbanyn and of Rugesablun. He also grants to the monks a tithe of 
their draw-nets at Joymersandes. Those gifts were to be had and held 
during the whole of his life on the monks rendering to him annually at 
the Nativity of St. John the Baptist [June 24] two salmons. His seal 
attached. 



LXXX 
De Logydurnach. 

VNIVERSIS christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel audi- 
turis Alanus Ostiarius, Justiciarius Scocie, eternam in domino 
salutem : Nouerit vniuersitas uestra me anno gracie m cc. 1, 
primo, Die martis, infra octavas apostolorum Petri et pauli, 
pro anima pie recordacionis domini mei Alexandri quondam 
illustris regis scocie, et pro salute anime mee, et Margerie 
uxoris mee, et omnium antecessorum et successorum meorum, 
de consensu et uoluntate venerabilis Patris, Domini P. dei 
gracia episcopi Aberdonensis, et religiosorum uirorum Abbatis 
et conuentus de Lundors, dedisse, concessisse, et presenti 
scripto confirmasse deo et capelle beate marie site in parochia 
de Logindurnach, quinque marcas annuas sterlingorum ad 
sustentacionem vnius capellani qui in dicta capella continue 



86 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

residebit, et de licencia dictorum Domini Episcopi Aberdo- 
nensis et abbatis et conuentus de Lundors in perpetuum de 
gloriosa uirgine maria diuina celebrabit, soluendas annuatim 
uicario ecclesie de Logindurnach qui pro tempore fuerit, ad 
duos terminos anni, scilicet, duas marcas et dimidiam ad 
Penthecosten, et duas marcas et dimidiam ad festum sancti 
martini in hyeme, de terra mea de Kinnerny per me et heredes 
meos, uel per ipsum quicunque dictam terrain tenuerit : Ita, 
uidelicet, quod non liceat michi uel heredibus meis prefatam 
terram uel aliquam ipsius partem aliquo genere alienacionis 
alienare, quin predicte quinque marce prefate capelle ad 
sustentacionem vnius capellani, ut dictum est, integre reseruen- 
tur, dicto vicario singulis annis fideliter persoluende. Ipse 
autem uicarius dictam capellam et prenominatum capellanum 
in omnibus decenter sustentabit, et omnia ornamenta ipsius 
capelle honeste inueniet. Quod quidem Ricardus tempore 
donacionis huius perpetuus uicarius ecclesie de Logindurnach 
existens nomine uicarie sue de consensu et uoluntate dicti 
domini Episcopi Aberdonensis pro se et successoribus suis 
[fol. 60.] fideliter promisit, | et in se nomine uicarie sue onus suscepit. 
Et sciendum quod si aliquo tempore a solucione dicte pecunie 
seu administracione capellani, quod absit, cessatum fuerit, 
liceat episcopo aberdonensi qui pro tempore fuerit tarn me et 
heredes meos, quam predictum uicarium ad omnia premissa et 
singula fideliter obseruanda per censuram ecclesiasticam com- 
pellere; Renunciato hincinde omni iuris beneficio, et omni 
excepcione sublata que michi et heredibus meis uel prefato 
uicario poterit competere, uel que executionem dicte censure 
aliquatenus poterit impedire uel differre. In cuius rei testi- 
monium duo super hoc in modum cirograffi confecta sunt 
instrumenta ; vnum sigillo dicti domini episcopi aberdonensis 
et sigillo meo sigillatum, quod penes se habere debent dicti 
abbas et conuentus de Lundors, et alterum communi sigillo 
ipsorum abbatis et conuentus, et sigillo prenominati vicarij de 
Logindurnach sigillatum penes me et heredes meos semper 
Residendum. Testibus, Domino Colino Ostiario fratre meo, 
Domino Thoma de Cunigburch, militibus, magistro Nicholao 
de Eddun, Jacobo de Ouen, Johanne excomunicato, et multis 
aliis. 



GRANT BY ALAN DURWARD 87 

OP LOGYDURNACH. 

To all the faithful of Christ who shall see or hear the present writ, 
Alan Durward, Justiciar of Scotland, health everlasting in the Lord. 
Know all of you that on Tuesday within the octave of the Apostles 
Peter and Paul, in the year of grace, MCCLi., 1 for the soul of my Lord, 
Alexander, of pious memory, late illustrious King of Scotland, and for 
the weal of my soul, and of Margery, my wife, and of all my ancestors 
and successors, I have, with the will and consent of the venerable 
father, P[eter], by the grace of God, Lord Bishop of Aberdeen, and of 
the religious men [i.e. men bound by monastic vows] the abbot and 
convent of Lundors, given, granted, and by this present writ confirmed 
to God and the chapel of Blessed Mary, situated in the parish of Login- 
durnach, five marks sterling a year, for the maintenance of a chaplain 
who in the said chapel will reside continually, and with the leave of the 
said Lord Bishop of Aberdeen and of the abbot and convent of Lundors 
will for ever celebrate divine services in honour of the Glorious Virgin 
Mary, [the five marks] to be paid annually to the vicar of the church of 
Logindurnach at the two terms of the year, namely, two marks and a 
half at Whitsunday and two marks and a half at the feast of St. 
Martin in winter, by me and my heirs, out of my land of Kinnerny, 
or by him whosoever shall hold the said land, in such wise that 
it may not be lawful for me or my heirs to alienate by any kind 
of alienation the aforesaid land or any part of it without reserving the 
aforesaid five marks for faithful payment to the said vicar every year in 
full, as has been said, for the maintenance of the chaplain of the said 
chapel. But the vicar will maintain the said chapel and the aforenamed 
chaplain becomingly in all things, and will find all the ecclesiastical fur- 
nishings of the chapel in honourable wise. Which thing, Richard, being 
perpetual vicar of the church of Logindurnach at the time of this 
donation, faithfully promised, with the will and consent of the said Lord 
Bishop of Aberdeen, for himself and his successors, in the name of his 
vicarage [i.e. the benefice]; and in the name of his vicarage took the 
burden upon himself. And let it be known that if at any time the pay- 
ment of the said money or the service of the chaplain shall cease, which 
God forbid, it shall be lawful for the Bishop of Aberdeen for the time 
being to compel by ecclesiastical censure as well me and my heirs as the 
aforesaid vicar to faithfully observe the premisses, all and singular ; all 
benefit of law being renounced, and all exception [in law] surrendered, 
which might be competent to me and my heirs, or to the vicar aforesaid, 
or which might impede or delay the execution of the said censure. In 
testimony of which two instruments were drawn up on the matter, in 
the manner of an indenture, one sealed with the seal of the said Lord 
Bishop of Aberdeen and with my seal, which should remain with the 



1 The feast of St. Peter and St. Paul is June 29th. This fell on Thursday in 
A.D. 1251, so the date of the charter is July 4th. 



88 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

said abbot and convent of Lundors, and the other, sealed with the 
common seal of the abbot and convent and with the seal of the afore- 
said vicar, always to remain with me and my heirs. Witnesses, Sir 
Colin Durward, my brother, Sir Thomas de Cunigburch, knights ; Master 
Nicholas de Eddun ; James de Oven ; excommunicated John ; and 
many others. 

LXXXI 

Donacio patronatus ecclesie de Lesselyn. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis tarn presentibus quam 
futuris, Normannus filius a malcolmi, salutem : Sciatis me con- 
cessisse et hac carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte 
marie et sancti andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo 
seruientibus et seruituris, ecclesiam de Lescelyn cum terris et 
decimis,obuencionibus et omnibus aliis rectitudinibus ad eandem 
ecclesiam iuste pertinentibus, pro amore dei et pro salute 
anime domini mei Comitis Dauid fratris Regis Scottorum, et 
Matildis Comitisse uxoris sue, et antecessorum et successorum 
suorum, et pro salute anime mee, et A. uxoris mee et ante- 
cessorum et successorum meorum ; Tenendam in liberam et 
puram et perpetuam elemosinam. Quare uolo ut prefati 
monachi predictam ecclesiam cum omnibus ad ipsam pertinen- 
tibus ita libere et quiete, plenarie et honorifice teneant et 
possideant in perpetuum, sicut aliquod monasterium aliquam 
ecclesiam uel aliquod ecclesiasticum beneficium ex alicujus 
concessione in toto regno Scocie liberius, quiecius, plenius et 
honorificencius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, Johanne 
Aberdonensi episcopo, Domino Comite Dauid, Waldeuo 
monacho de Kelcho, R. Decano de Aberdene, magistro omero, 
Johanne et Bricio capellanis de Burgo, Matheo et S. capel- 
lanis de Aberdene, Waltero Olifer, Dauid de Lindesei, h. et h. 
filiis Comitis Dauid, Willelmo Wacelyn, Willelmo persona de 
Dunde, Kinef iudice, Normanno filio Bertolfi, J. de Stokes 
senescaldo episcopi de Aberdene, W. de Warte, Jacobo 
camerario, Matheo filio edrici, Willelmo filio Hugonis, 
Johanne capellano de Inueruri, Petro Pincerna, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

1 DONATION of the PATRONAGE of the CHURCH of LESSELYN.' 
NORMAN, son of Malcolm, grants to Lundors the church of Lescelyn 
with its lands, tithes, obventions, and all other rights justly pertaining 



THE PATRONAGE OF LESLIE 89 

to the same church, for the love of God, and for the weal ' of the soul of 
my lord, Earl David, brother of the King of Scots, and of the Countess 
Matilda, his wife, and of all his ancestors and successors, and for the 
weal of the soul of me, and of my wife A., and of all my ancestors and 
successors,' to be held in free, pure, and perpetual alms, as freely, 
quietly, etc. Witnesses . . . 



LXXXII 

Confirmacio comitis Dauid super donacione 
patronatus ecclesie de Lesselyn. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus tarn presenti- 
bus quam futuris, Comes Dauid f rater Regis Scottorum, 
Salutem : Sciatis me concessisse, et hac presenti carta mea 
confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte marie et sancti an dree de 
Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, donacionem 
quam Normannus filius malcolmi predictis monachis dedit, 
scilicet, ecclesiam de Lescelin, cum terris et decimis et omnibus 
aliis prouentibus et iustis pertinenciis suis, in perpetuam et 
puram elemosinam, in proprios usus et sustentaciones ipsorum 
monachorum libere, quiete, plenarie et honorifice, sicut carta 
predict! Normanni testatur. Quare uolo et concede ut prefati 
monachi predictam ecclesiam habeant et possideant, ita libere, 
quiete, plenarie, et honorifice sicut aliqua alia abbacia uel 
domus religionis aliquam elemosinam vel aliquam ecclesiam in 
toto regno Domini Regis fratris mei, liberius, quiecius, plenius, 
et honorificencius tenet et possidet. | Hiis testibus, Johanne [/&/. W.J 
episcopo aberdonensi, Simone archidiacono, Roberto Decano, 
Ricardo capellano comitis, duobus Henricis filiis Domini 
Comitis, Willelmo Wascelyn, Henrico et Ricardo clericis 
Domini Comitis, cum multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' EARL DAVID'S CONFIRMATION of the DONATION of the PATRONAGE of the 
CHURCH of LESSELYN.' 

EARL DAVID, brother of the King of Scots, grants, and confirms by 
the present charter, to Lundors the donation made by Norman, son of 
Malcolm, of the church of Lescelin, with its lands, tithes, and other 
revenues, and just pertinents, for their own uses and the maintenance 
of the monks. The said church to be had and possessed, as freely, etc. 
Witnesses . 



90 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

LXXXIII 

Ratificacio filij de ecclesia Lesselyn super 
donacione patris. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis hoc scriptum uisuris uel 
audituris Normannus films Normanni constabulary, salutem. 
Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me ratam et gratam habere dona- 
cionem quam bone memorie Normannus constabularius, pater 
meus, fecit abbati et monachis de Lundors ibidem deo seruien- 
tibus et in perpetuum seruituris de ecclesia de Lescelyn cum 
omnibus pertinenciis suis, sicut carta dicti Normanni patris 
mei super hoc confecta plenius testatur: Et ut hec mea 
donacio rata et inconcussa maneat in perpetuum, presenti 
scripto sigillum meum apposui. Hiis testibus, venerabili 
patre, Radulfo Aberdonensi episcopo, magistris Roberto 
Decano Aberdonensi, Ricardo officiali, Andrea de Aberdene, 
Willelmo de Kirketon, Ricardo Veyrement, Reginaldo Buscel, 
Johann de Soltre, et Dominis Walerano de Normanville, 
Simone de Garentuli, Johanne de Lamberton, Ada Nappario, 
Simone de Tyndale, Ricardo de insula, Johanne fratre meo, 
Willelmo de Blakeburne, Willelmo de Edduy, et multis aliis. 
Datum in ecclesia sancti Nicholai de Aberdene, anno gracie, 
m.cc.xl. tercio, in crastino sancti Bartholomei apostoli. 

(Abstract) 
f RATIFICATION by the son of the gift of the CHURCH of LESSELYN made 

by the father.' 

NORMAN, son of Norman, Constable, ratifies the donation which his 
father Norman, Constable, made to Lundors, namely of the church of 
Lescelyn with all its pertinents, as the charter of Norman, his father, 
more fully contains. His seal attached. Witnesses. . . . Given in 
the Church of St. Nicholas of Aberdeen on the morrow of St. Bartholomew 
the Apostle [Aug. 24], in the year of grace MCCXLIII. 

LXXXIV 

[De Johanne filio Thome de Malind.] 

rhrHti firlp]iVms presentfis _ littoras inspccturiir, 



Normanus de lescelinflusTJoTmaTmi constabularij , 

1 A pen has been lightly drawn in the MS., as here indicated, across the 
opening lines of this writ. There is no rubric. 



QUITCLAIM OF BONDSMEN 91 

eternam in domino. Nouerit vniuersitas 
me quietain^etema^se^abbati et conuettli^3e Lundors 
pro me et heredibus^Bs^feotGm^us ligiacionis quod me 
habere clajnaui-^irTTohannem filium tholne~~-de-j2ialind, et in 
ermieni sequelam de corpore suo exeuntem in perpel 
Saluo michi clamio quod habeo in alios de parentela dicti 
Johannis. Et in huius quiete clamacionis testimonium huic 
scripto sigillum meum apposui. Datum apud capellam sancti 
Appolinaris, die sabbati proxima post translacionem sancti 
Thome Martins, anno gracie m. cc. 1. tercio, presentibus 
Dominis Bartholomeo flandrensi, Andrea de lescelin, militibus, 
Willelmo theyno de Kintor, Roberto de tubertyn, clerico, 
Henrico de Maleuile, Johanne Roberti, Johanne filio Walteri, 
Burgensibus de Inueruri, Henrico filio Johannis, et aliis. 

(Abstract) 
[Or JOHN, SON of THOMAS of MALIND.] 

To all the faithful of Christ who shall view the present letters, Norman 
de Lescelin, son of Norman, the Constable, health everlasting in the 
Lord. Know all of you that I have quitclaimed for ever to the abbot 
and convent of Lundors, for me and my heirs, all right of bondship 
(jus ligiacionis) which I claimed to have on John, son of Thomas of 
Malind, and in all the issue of his body (in omnem sequelam de corpore suo 
exeuntem) saving the claim which I have upon others of the kin of the 
said John. And in testimony of this quitclaim 1 have put my seal to 
this writ. Given at the chapel of St. Apollinaris, on Saturday next 
after the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr [July 7 *], in the year 
of grace MCCLIII., there being present Sir Bartholomew Fleming and Sir 
Andrew de Lescelin, knights ; William, Thane of Kintore ; Robert de 
Tubertyn, clerk ; . . . and others. 



LXXXV 

[De Tofto in Inuerkaithin. 2 ] 

ROBERTVS de lundoniis, filius Regis Scottorum omnibus amicis 
suis, salutem : Sciatis me dedisse et hac presenti carta mea con- 
firmasse ecclesie sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors, 
et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus vnum plenarium toftum 

1 7th July fell on Monday in 1253 ; and therefore the date of the charter is 
I2th July 1253. 2 N O ru b r j c i n MS> 



92 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

in burgo meo de Inuerkaithin, in liberam et quietam et per- 
petuam elemosinam. Quare uolo ut predict! monachi habeant 
et possideant predictum toftum ita libere et quiete et pacifice 
et honorifice, sicut aliqua ecclesia aliquam elemosinam in toto 
regno Scocie liberius, quiecius, plenius et honorificencius tenet 
et possidet. Hiis testibus, Comite Dauid fratre Regis Scotorum, 
Comite patricio, Willelmo de Lindesei, Willelmo de Haya, 
Ricardo Ridel, Willelmo Sumeruille, Walkelino filio Stephani, 
Simone de Seyntliz, Nicholao de Adsles,Hugone de dettauerley. 1 

(Abstract) 
[OF a TOFT in INVERKAITHIN.] 

* ROBERT of London, son of the King of Scots, to all his friends, greet- 
ing.' He grants to Lundors one full toft in his burgh of Inverkaithin 
to be held in frankalmoign, as freely . . .as any church holds any alms 
in the kingdom of Scotland. Witnesses . . . 



LXXXVI 
De j marca in Hamildun. 

VNIVERSIS Christi fidelibus Willelmus de Camera, salutem in 
domino. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me dedisse, concessisse, 
et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte 
marie et sancti andree de Lundors, et monachis ibidem deo 
seruientibus et seruituris, pro salute aniine Domini mei Comitis 
Dauid et Matilde Comitisse uxoris sue, et antecessorum et 
successorum suorum, et pro salute anime mee, et B. uxoris mee, 
[/<?/. 62.] et patrum nostrorum et matrum nostrarum | et puerorum et 
omnium antecessorum et successorum nostrorum, in liberam 
puram et perpetuam elemosinam, omne dominium quod 
habui in parua hamildune et vnam marcam argenti de firma 
ipsius uille, ita quod vna altera marca quam inde solebam per- 
cipere remaneat michi, et cui illam uoluero concedere. Quare 
uolo et concede ut predicti monachi habeant et possideant 
dominium predicte uille liberum et quietum de me et heredibus 
meis in perpetutim, sicut illtid melius et plenius habui et tenui 
tempore quo feci donacionem istam, et recipiant annuatim de 
ipsa uilla marcam suam ; Ita quod altera marca remaneat 
1 So in MS. 



CHARGES ON HAMILDUN AND STOKES 93 

niichi, et cui illam concessero, sine aliquo alio iure uel dominio 
uel clamio quod habui uel habere potui, uel aliquis heredum 
meorum, in uilla prenominata, vt autem hec mea donacio et 
concessio stabilis sit in perpetuum, presenti scripto sigillum 
meum apposui. Hiis testibus, Domino meo Comite Dauid, et 
filiis ipsius Johanne et henrico de Striuelin et henrico de 
Brechin, Roberto Basset, Roberto filio Roberti, Constantino 
de Mortemer, militi Domini Comitis, Alexandro de Striuelin, 
Ricardo filio hugonis, henrico filio Walkelini filij Stephani. 

(Abstract) 
'Op one MARK in HAMILDUN.' 

WILLIAM DE CAMERA grants to Lundors for the weal of the soul ' of 
my lord, Earl David, and of the Countess Matilda his wife, and the 
souls of all his ancestors and successors, and for the weal of my soul and 
of B. my wife, our fathers and our mothers, and our children and all 
our ancestors and successors/ in frankalmoign, ' all lordship which I 
have in Little Hamildune and one silver mark out of the rent of that 
vill, so that one other mark which I was accustomed to receive shall 
remain with me and him to whom I may will to grant it.' Wherefore 
he grants that the monks should possess the lordship of the said vill, of 
him and his heirs, as fully and freely as he possessed it at the date of 
this gift. They are to receive their one mark from the vill, and the 
other mark is to remain with him and the person to whom he might 
grant it, but without any other right, lordship, or claim. His seal 
attached. Witnesses . 



LXXXVII 
De iij marcis de Stokes in comitatu leycestre. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris Willelmus de 
campania, salutem. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me dedisse, 
concessisse, et hac presenti carta mea confimasse, deo et ecclesie 
sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem 
deo seruientibus et seruituris, pro salute anime patris mei 
Roberti de campania, qui ibidem sepultus est, et pro animabus 
omnium antecessorum et successor um meorum, in puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam, tres marcas argenti annuatim percipi- 
endas de me et heredibus meis ad Penthecosten in terra mea 
de Stokes in comitatu leycestre. Predicti uero monachi ad 
peticionem meam caritatiue concesserunt quod singulis diebus 



94 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

in perpetuum ad altare sancti Nicholai cantetur aliqua missa in 
eadem ecclesia, in qua fiet commemoracio specialis pro anima 
patris mei, et pro animabus omnium fidelium defunctorum. 
Vt autem hec mea donacio rata sit et stabilis in perpetuum 
presenti scripto sigillum meum apposui. Testibus, Domino 
Johanne Comite Cestre et Huntendone, Domino henrico de 
Striuelyn, Domino henrico de Brechyn, Domino Radulfo de 
Campania, Domino Galfrido de Appelby, Domino Tebaldo de 
Bellus, Domino Hugone Fitun, Domino Radulfo de Saye, 
Domino Anketyn, Domino Peleryn, Hugone clerico, Petro 
clerico, Nichola de Inuerpeffyr, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
'Or three MARKS from STOKES in the COUNTY of LEICESTER. ' 

WILLIAM DE CAMPANIA grants to Lundors for the weal of the soul of 
his father Robert de Campania, and of all his ancestors and successors, 
in pure and perpetual alms, three silver marks to be received annually 
of him and his heirs at Whitsunday ' in my land of Stokes in the county 
of Leicester. The monks aforesaid have charitably granted my petition 
that a mass should be sung every day for ever at the altar of St. Nicholas 
in the same church [i.e. the church of Lundors], in which mass special 
commemoration shall be made for the soul of my father and for the soul 
of all the faithful departed.' Seal. Witnesses... 



LXXXVIII 

MEMORANDVM quod dominus Willelmus de Campania in curia 
sua apud Turleston, die Sancti Botulfi abbatis anno gracie m 
cc quadragesimo octauo, assignauit Willelmum de Estleye ad 
reddendum annuatim quam diu uixerit apud stoke monachis 
de Lundors uel eorum nuncio quadraginta solidos argenti infra 
ebdomodam Penthecostes. Hiis testibus, Domino Alano tune 
celarario de Suleby, Hugone de Blaby tune capellano de 
Turleston, Willelmo Walkelyn de Leycestre capellano, Rogero 
de Stoke, Willelmo Vmfrey de Stoke, Thoma de hey ham, 
Henrico le frankeleyn de Norhamton, et aliis. 

(Abstract) 

MEMORANDUM. Sir William de Campania in his court at Turleston, 
on the day of St. Botolph, Abbot, [June 17] in the year of grace MCCXLVIII. 



FEE-FERME OF TOFT IN DUNDEE 95 

appointed William de Estleye to pay yearly, as long; as he lived, at 
Stoke, to the monks of Lundors, or their messenger, forty silver 
shillings, within the week of Whitsunday. Witnesses . . .] 



LXXXIX 

De tofto in Dunde. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel audi- 
turis Thomas dei gracia abbas de Lundors et eiusdem loci 
conuentus, eternam in domino salutem. Nouerit vniuersitas 
uestra nos vnanimi consensu et uoluntate dimisisse ad feodam- 
firmam Laurencio de monte alto clerico totum toftum nostrum 
integrum in uilla de Dunde quod iacet proximum terre uicarij 
eiusdem uille, quam habet idem uicarius iuxta ecclesiam sancti 
dementis martiris in parte occidentali : Tenendum de nobis 
et successoribus nostris sibi et assignatis suis et heredibus 
assignatorum in perpetuum, Integre, plenarie et honorifice cum 
eisdem libertatibus et asiamentis quibus nos dictum toftum 
tenuimus uel tenere debuirnus. Prenominatus autem Lauren- 
cius, quamdiu uixerit, nobis et successoribus nostris pro pre- 
dicto tofto reddet annuatim vnam marcam argenti infra 
nundinas de Dunde. Assignati, uero, eiusdem Laurencii et 
eorundem assignatorum heredes qui dictum toftum tenebunt 
post mortem ipsius Laurencij reddent nobis annuatim duas 
marcas argenti infra dictas nundinas de Dunde. Et preterea 
predictus Laurencius et assignati sui et eorum heredes in- 
uenient nobis et nostris, omnibus et singulis, quociens uolu- 
erimus, honestam domum in dicto tofto vbi nos et nostri 
decenter hospitari poterimus, pro omni exaccione et demanda. 
Et sciendum quod predictus Laurencius predictum toftum 
nullis secularibus personis nobis dicioribus uel potencioribus, 
nee eciam alicui domui Religiose siue uiris Religiosis assigna- 
bit. Nee idem Laurencius uel sui assignati uel eorum heredes 
predictum toftum uendent, uel aliquo modo alienabunt, nisi 
de nostra processerit licencia et uoluntate. Et ad omnia 
prenominata et notata sine omni cauillacione, fraude, et malo 
ingenio fideliter in perpetuum obseruanda dictus Laurencius 
pro se et assignatis suis et eorum heredibus affidauit. Et 



96 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

insuper se et suos assignatos et assignatorum heredes si 
aliquando, quod absit, contra tenorem huius script! maliciose 
uel fraud ulenter fecerint, per sepedicti tofti amissionem et 
omnium bonorum in eo existencium, donee nobis satisfactum 
fuerit, obligauit. In cuius rei firmitatem, et perpetuam securi- 
tatem istud scriptum in modum cirograffi est confectum, 
Cuius uidelicet scripti vni parti commune sigillum capituli 
nostri est appensum, quam partem penes se debet habere 
dictus Laurencius uel aliquis ex parte ipsius. Alteri autem 
parti huius scripti sigillum predicti Laurencii est appositum, 
que quidem pars penes nos remanet. Teste Capitulo. 

(Abstract) 
' OF a TOFT in DUNDEE.' 

THOMAS, by the grace of God, Abbot of Lundors, grants at fee-farm to 
Laurence de Montealto, clerk, ' our whole entire toft in the town of 
Dundee, which lies next the land of the vicar of that town, which the 
same vicar has near the church of St Clement the Martyr, in the western 
part, to be held of us and our successors by him and his assignees and 
the heirs of his assignees for ever,' with all its liberties, easements, etc. 
Laurence as long as he lives is to pay annually to the abbot and his 
successors one silver mark during the holding of the fair of Dundee. 
After the death of Laurence his assignees and the heirs of his assignees 
are to pay at the aforesaid time each year two silver marks. In addition 
the said Laurence and his assignees and the heirs of his assignees ' shall 
find for us and ours, all and singular, a house in the said toft where we 
and ours may be entertained becomingly as often as we wish, and this 
in lieu of every exaction and demand.' And let it be known that the 
aforesaid Laurence will not assign the toft to any secular persons richer 
or more powerful than we are, nor even to a religious house or to any 
religious men [i.e. to any monks]. Nor shall the said Laurence, his 
assignees or their heirs sell the toft, or alienate it in any way, unless 
with the will and permission of the abbots of Lundors. To faithfully 
observe all these things Laurence for himself, his assignees, and the 
heirs of his assignees, made oath. And further he bound himself, his 
assignees and their heirs by the loss of the toft and all good thereupon 
(till full satisfaction was made) if they ever did any thing maliciously or 
fraudulently, which God forbid, contrary to the tenor of this writ. The 
writ was made in the form of an indenture, one part of which, sealed 
with the common seal of the chapter of Lundors, was to be kept by 
Laurence or by some one on his behalf. The other part, to which the 
seal of Laurence was affixed, was to remain with the monks of Lundors. 
Witness, the chapter. 



GRANTS BY EARL JOHN 97 

XC 

De Tofto in Dunde, et de perambulacione 
de Durnach. 1 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum uisuris uel audituris J.de Scocia, comes 
Cestre et him tend un, salutem. Sciatis me dedisse et hac carta 
mea confirmasse Deo et ecclesie Sancte marie et sancti andree 
de Lundors et monachis ibidem Deo seruientibus et seruituris, 
vnum Toftum in Dunde, proximum tofto Sancti dementis 
uersus occidentem, et piscariam in tehy proximam piscarie 
quam dedi domino Henrico de Brehin uersus Portincrag ; 
Tenendum sibi et habendum in liberam puram et perpetuam De perambula- 
elemosinam. Concessi eciam eis ut terra ilia que perambulata nacS 
fuit inter magnam Durnach et logindurnach coram me et 
Dompno J. abbate de Lundors et aliis probis hominibus, sit in 
communi inperpetuum, sicut recognitum fuit per sacramenta 
illorum qui terram illam perambulauerunt, et quod de cetero 
non fiat aliqua perambulacio inter terras meas et terras illorum, 
sed teneant ipsas diuisas quas habuerunt tempore patris mei et 
tempore meo sine molestia et grauamine. Volo eciam et 
concedo ut quando uoluerint uel potuerint facere molendina in 
terris suis, nullus successorum meorum impediat homines 

| manentes in terris ipsorum ire libere et quiete ad molendina [fol. 64.] 
ilia, cum omni secta sua et multura, quamuis solebant sequi 
molendina mea quamdiu fuerint sine molendinis propriis. 
Testibus, Domino H. de Striuelin fratre meo, Domino Roberto 
de Campaniis, Domino Hugone phiton, Domino Galfrido de 
Appilby, Domino Anketill de foleuille, Petro et Rogero clericis, 
Hugone de Pantona, Baldwino de Anuers, Petro Pincerna ; 
apud Berewic. 

(Abstract) 
' OF a TOFT in DUNDEE, and of the PERAMBULATION of DURNACH.' 

' J[OHN] of Scotland, Earl of Chester and Huntingdon/ grants to 
Lundors a toft in Dundee next the toft of St. Clement towards the west, 
and a fishery in the Tay, next the fishery which he gave to Henry of 
Brechin facing Portincrag, in pure and perpetual alms. He grants also 

1 This and the two following writs are in another and later hand. And the 
ink has faded. With variations in spelling this is No. xix. 

G 



98 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

that that land which was perambulated between Great Durnach and 
Logindurnach in the presence of himself, J., Lord Abbot of Lundors, and 
other good men should be for ever in common, as it was acknowledged 
to have been on the oaths of those who perambulated it. And further 
he grants that in future there should be no perambulation between his 
lands and the lands of the monks of Lundors, but that they should have 
the same marches which they had in the time of his father and in his 
time, without trouble or annoyance. He further grants that when the 
monks are able and willing to make mills upon their lands none of 
his successors should hinder the men residing on the lands of the monks 
from going freely and quietly to those mills with all their suit and 
multure, although they had been accustomed to be thirled to his mills 
as long as they had been without mills of their own. Witnesses, Henry 
of Stirling, my brother, . . . 



XCI 
De manso iuxta ecclesiam de Cullessy. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum peruenerit, 
Dominus Serlo de Sancto Andrea, salutem eternam in domino. 
Nouerit vniuersitas vestra me caritatis intuitu, et ad instanciam 
precum magistri Ade de Malcharwiston tune temporis Rectoris 
ecclesie de Colessy, dedisse et quieteclamasse deo et ecclesie 
Sancti Andree de Colessy, in puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
totum jus quod habui uel habere potui in edificiis uel in 
mesuagio personatus ecclesie de Colessy, in libero introitu et 
exitu ex parte australi usque ad stratam publicam, usque eciam 
ad illas diuisas inter ipsum mesuagium et terrain meam circum- 
iacentem limitanas ; et incipiunt ille diuise ex parte Aquilonari 
cuiusdam furni siti infra mesuagium pertinens ad ecclesiam, et 
se extendunt uersus orientem usque ad vnam petram pro 
diuisa positam, et sic extrauerso uersus partem australem 
usque ad aliam petram similiter pro diuisa positam, et ab illo 
loco linealiter usque ad murum Cymiterii ad quamdam diuisam 
ibi factam : Tenendum et habendum Deo et prefate ecclesie 
libere, solute, et quiete ita quod nee ego nee aliquis heredum 
meorum infra dictas diuisas aliquod Jus vel clamium in futuris 
temporibus possimus exigere, ad cuius rei memoriam hoc 
scriptum sigilli mei impressione corroboraui. Hiis testibus, 
Domino R. Comite Wynton, Domino Willelmo de Bosco, 
Domino Bernardo de Rippelle, Domino Willelmo de Forest, 



THE MANSE OF COLLESSIE 99 

Johanne de Kindeloch, Henrico de Winton, Willelmo de 
Monimel capellano, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' OF the MANSE near the CHURCH of CULLESSY.' 

SIR SERLO of St. Andrews, out of charity and at the instance of 
Master Adam of Malcharwiston, at that time rector of the church of 
Colessy, gives and quitclaims to God and the church of St. Andrew at 
Colessy, in pure and perpetual alms, all the right which he had or could 
have in the buildings and messuage of the parsonage of the church of 
Colessy, with free entrance and exit on the south to the public street, 
as far also as the boundary marches between that messuage and his 
surrounding land. The marches begin on the north of a certain oven 
(furni) situated within the messuage pertaining to the church, and 
extend towards the east as far as a stone placed to mark the boundary, 
and so across toward the south to another stone similarly placed to mark 
the boundary, and from that place in a line to a boundary made at the 
wall of the graveyard. ' To be held and had by God and the aforesaid 
church free and released, so that neither he nor any of his heirs could 
exact any right or claim in time to come within the said marches.' 
Seal. Witnesses . 



XCII 
De vicariis qui molestauerunt locum nostrum. 1 

CANCELLARIVS morauiensis et thesaurarius Dunkeldensis dele- 
gati perpetui ad infrascripta, una cum tercio collega iam 
defuncto, cum ilia clausula quod si non omnes hiis exequendis 
poteritis tractare duo vestrum ea nichilominus exequantur, a 
sede apostolica specialiter deputati, omnibus et singulis decanis, 
archidiaconis, cantoribus, cancellariis, thesaurariis, et canonicis 
ecclesiarum cathedralium per totum regnum scocie constitutis, 
nee non rectoribus et perpetuis vicariis, capellanis, et notariis 
publicis infra dictum regnum et aliis, ubilibet constitutis, 
Salutem in domino, et nostris, ymo verius apostolicis, humiliter 
obedire mandatis. literas apostolicas ex parte abbatis et 



1 The scribe has utilised the blank space on the last leaf of the gathering to 
insert this writ. The script is crowded and abounds in contractions. While 
only twenty-five lines ordinarily occupy each of the earlier pages, thirty-seven 
lines are packed into this page. 



100 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

comientus monastery de L. ordinis beati benedicti Sancti 
Aridree diocesis nobis presentatas, sanas et integras, cum debita 
reuerencia recepimus et vidimus, tenoris et continencie instru- 
ment! publici presentibus annexati. Post quarum presenta- 
cionem nobis fuit expositum conquirendo quod nonnulli 
vicarij in supradictis literis apostolicis nominati, videlicet, 
perpetui vicarii ecclesiarum de C. de R. et de K. ipsis abbati 
et conuentui super augmentacionem suarum vicariarum moles- 
tias et iniurias inferunt, faciendo eos citari coram non suo 
iudice in hoc casu sub grauibus laboribus et expensis, et 
nichilominus dictus vicarius de K. eisdem subtrahit xxx agnos 
pacabiles, in quibus eisdem tenetur annuatim, et in ipsorum 
solucione iam per tres annos cessauit, in ipsorum preiudicium 
atque dampnum, quare nobis fuit ex parte ipsorum et conuentus 
de oportuno remedio supplicatum. Nos, igitur, huius modi 
supplicacionibus annuentes, auctoritate apostolica, quam fun- 
gimur in hac parte, vobis et vestrum cuilibet in solidum in 
uirtute sancte obediencie, et sub pena excommunicacionis 
precipimus et mandamus quatinus infra sex dies postquam ex 
parte ipsorum abbatis et conuentus, aliquis vestrum fuerit 
requisitus, dictos vicarios et eorum quemlibet moneatis, quod 
a predictis molestacionibus cessent penitus et desistant, et 
quod vicarius de K. de dictis xxx agnis tarn de anno present! 
quam de tempore suo preterite ipsis abbati et conuentui satis- 
faciat, et quod tarn ipse quam vicarij de C. et de R. de fabrica 
cancellarum suarum ecclesiarum, et de omnibus oneribus 
extraordinariis pro porcione sua respondeant de cetero, et 
contribuant cum ipsis abbate et conuentu ad premissa, et quod 
hec omnia faciant et perficiant infra xv dies a tempore moni- 
cionmn vestrarum computandos : quorum quinque pro prima, 
v pro secunda, et reliquos v dies pro tercia et peremptoria 
monicione eis et eorum cuilibet assignamus, sub pena excom- 
municacionis quam ex mine prout extunc in Mis scriptis ferimus 
in rebelles, absolucione nobis et superiori nostro, preterquam in 
mortis articulo, reseruata. Datum sub sigillis nostris apud 
Perth xx iiij to die mensis junij anno domini m ccc mo lxxv to . 
de die autem monicionum qui eas fecerit nobis sufficienter 
constare faciat, vt de ulteriori, si necesse fuerit, possimus- 
remedio prouidere. Datum ut supra. 

** 




A JUDICIAL DECREE 101 

(Abstract) 
'OF VICARS who have troubled our PLACE.' 

THE Chancellor of Moray and the Treasurer of Dunkeld holding in 
continuation the office of Papal Delegates in respect to the matters 
dealt with below (as having been specially deputed, together with a third 
colleague now deceased, in a writ containing the clause that ' if all of 
you cannot proceed to the execution of these things, nevertheless let 
two of you execute them '), to all and singular the deans, archdeacons, 
chantors, chancellors, treasurers, and canons of the cathedral churches 
throughout the whole realm of Scotland, also to the rectors, perpetual 
vicars, chaplains, and notaries public within the said kingdom and 
others, wheresoever they may happen to be, [wish] health in the Lord 
' and obedience to our commands, or, more truly, the commands of the 
Apostolic See.' They recount that they had received with becoming 
reverence Letters Apostolic, presented on the part of the abbot and 
convent of Lundors. These Letters were whole and perfect, and of 
the tenor and contents of the public instrument annexed to these 
presents. 1 After the presentation of the Letters Apostolic it was ex- 
plained to the Delegates on inquiry that some vicars named in the 
Letters Apostolic, namely, the perpetual vicars of the churches of 
C., of R., and of K., were causing trouble and injury to the abbot and 
convent in regard to an augmentation of their vicarages. They had 
caused the abbot and monks to be cited before a judge, who in this 
matter had no jurisdiction over them, and by this they caused heavy 
expense and inconvenience to the abbot and convent. Moreover, the 
vicar of K. had withdrawn from the convent the payment of thirty 
marketable (pacabiles) lambs which he was bound to render every year. 
It was now three years since the payment of the lambs had been made, 
to the harm and loss of the abbot and convent. Wherefore supplica- 
tion was made to the Delegates on the part of the monks for suitable 
redress. 'We, therefore, assenting to such supplications, order and 
command, by the apostolic authority which we exercise in this respect, 
you and each of you severally, in virtue of holy obedience and under 
pain of excommunication, that, within six days after any of you shall 
have been requested on the part of the abbot and convent, ye admonish 
the said vicars and each of them to wholly cease and desist from the 
molestations aforesaid, and that the vicar of K. satisfy the abbot and 
convent for the thirty lambs, as well for the present year as for the 
time past ; and that he [the vicar of K.], as also the vicars of C. and R., 
in future pay their portion for the fabric of the chancels of their churches, 
and their portion of all extraordinary burdens, and contribute with the 
abbot and convent to the same ; and that they [the vicars] should do 
and accomplish all these things within fifteen days, computed from the 



1 The public instrument referred to does not appear in the Chartulary. 



" 

S '- 



102 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

date of your admonition. Of these fifteen days we assign, to them and 
each of them, five days for the first, five days for the second, and the 
remaining five days for the third and peremptory monition, under pain 
of excommunication, which we pronounce, now as well as then, against 
rebels, absolution being reserved to us and our superior, save at the 
hour of death (in mortis articulo). Given under our seals at Perth on 
the twenty-fourth day of the month of June in the year of our Lord 
MCCCLXXV. 

' Whoever gives the monition is to inform us as to the date, so that 
if necessary we may be able to provide further remedy. Given as 
above. ' 



XCIII 
6s.] Magnum priuilegium Celestini de exempcione. 1 

CELESTINVS Episcopus, seruus seruorum del, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et fratribus monastery de Lundors, salutem et apostoli- 
cam benediccionem. Officij nostri debitum et caritas ordinata 
requirunt vt eorum deuocionem ad incrementum plenius attenta 
sollicitudine prouocemus, qui ampliando creatoris obsequio 
diligenter insistunt, et firmum iam propositum assumpserimt 
ad idem forcius ac feruencius ipsius fauente gracia intendendi. 
Ea propter, Dilecti in domino filij, propensius attendentes quod 
Dilectus filius noster Nobilis uir Dauid Comes frater Karissimi 
in Christo filij nostri W. illustris Regis Scocie, monasterium 
uestrum ea intencione fundauerit, ac dilatauerit plurimis bonis 
ut dignus in eo debeat domino sub monastico habitu famulatus 
impendi, et affectu habeat possessiones et redditus eius vberius 
ampliandi, eius instanti supplicacione deuicti, monasterium 
ipsum in quo diuino mancipati estis obsequio a iurisdiccione 
quorumlibet eximentes, in ius et proprietatem beati Petri susci- 
pimus, et presentis scripti patrocinio communimus. In primis 
siquidem statuentes, ut ordo monasticus, qui secundum Deum 
et beati benedicti regulam in eodem monasterio institutus esse 
dinoscitur, perpetuis ibidem temporibus inuiolabiliter obseruetur. 
Preterea quascunque possessiones quecunque bona idem monas- 
terium in presenciarum iuste ac pacifice possidet, aut in futurum 
concessione pontificum, largicione regum uel principum, obla- 



1 The distinct and beautiful handwriting of the earlier scribe is here, at the 
beginning of a new gathering, resumed. 



BULL OF POPE CELESTIN 7 E III. 103 

clone fidelium seu aliis iustis modis, prestante domino, poterit 
adipisci, firma vobis uestrisque successoribus et illibata per- 
maneant. In quibus hec propriis duximus exprimenda uoca- 
bulis : Locum ipsum, in quo prefatum monasterium situm est, 
cum omnibus pertinenciis suis per suas rectas diuisas ex dono 
et concessione eiusdem Comitis, et liberam curiam in terra 
uestra et firmam pacem infra diuisas ipsius uille de Lundors 
sicut carta ipsius Comitis protestatur : Ecclesiam quoque 
eiusdem uille de Lundors, cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis, 
et terrain ad predictam ecclesiam pertinentem per rectas diuisas 
suas, et alias terras in eadem uilla, que terre in carta eiusdem 
Comitis continentur : Et asiamenta insule que vocatur redinche 
communia uobis sicut et comiti ad proprios usus vestros, et vnam 
piscariam in They iuxta prenominatam insulam, et molendinum 
predicte uille de Lundors, cum omni secta sua et multura : 
Ecclesiam quoque de Dunde cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, et 
vnum toftum in burgo de Dunde, liberum et quietum ab omni 
seruicio et exaccione : Et ultra muneth, fintrith per rectas 
diuisas suas cum omnibus pertinenciis, et ecclesiam eiusdem 
uille, cum pertinenciis suis : Et in Garuiach, Ledhgauel et 
Malind cum omnibus pertinenciis suis et per rectas diuisas suas : 
Et ecclesiam de Rothket cum capellis suis, scilicet, Inueruryn 
et Munkegin, et cum aliis pertinenciis suis : Et ecclesiam de 
Durnach, ecclesiam de Prame, ecclesiam de Radmuriel, eccle- 
siam de Ingemabanin, ecclesiam de Culsamuel, et in episcopatu 
Lincolniensi ecclesiam de Cunigton ; ecclesiam de Kelalcmund 
cum capellis earundem ecclesiarum, terris, et decimis, et omnibus 
earum pertinenciis, ad proprios usus et sustentaciones vestras : 
Et vnum toftum in burgo de Inueruryn liberum et quietum 
ab omni seruicio et exaccione : Decimam eciam omnium 
lucrorum et placitorum eiusdem Comitis infra terrain suam et 
extra ultra muneth, quam habuit tempore quo fecit donacionem 
istam : Et Decimam omnium lucrorum ipsius que ei pro- 
ueniunt de lucris predicti Regis in toto regno suo, et decimam 
omnium Rerum dicti Comitis et heredum suorum ultra moneth : 
Ex donacione quoque memorati regis, vnum plenarium toftum 
in burgo suo de Berewic, et vnum plenarium toftum in burgo [fol. 66.] 
suo de Striuelin : | Et unum plenarium toftum in burgo suo 
de Karel, et vnum plenarium toftum in burgo suo de 



104 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Perth : Et vnum plenarium toftum in burgo suo de forfar, et 
vnum plenarium toftum in burgo suo de Munros, et vnum 
plenarium toftum in burgo suo de Aberden : Ex donacione 
uero Roberto de Lundres filij prefati regis, vnum plenarium 
toftum in burgo de Inuerkeythyn, sicut hec que prediximus iuste 
ac pacifice possidetis ut a in donatorum earum scriptis aucten- 
ticis continetur, Vobis et per uos monasterio uestro auctori- 
tate apostolica confirmamus. Sane Noualium uestrorum que 
propriis manibus aut sumptibus colitis, siue de nutrimentis 
animalium uestrorum nullus a uobis decimas exigere uel extor- 
quere presumat. Liceat quoque uobis clericos et laicos liberos 
et absolutes e seculo fugientes ad conuersionem recipere, et eos 
absque contradiccione retinere. Prohibemus insuper ut nulli 
fratrum uestrorum post factam in eodem loco professionem fas 
sit absque abbatis sui licencia de eodem loco nisi arcioris 
religioriis obtentu discedere. Discedentem uero absque com- 
munium litterarum caucione nullus audeat retinere. Cum 
autem generale interdictum terre fuerit, liceat uobis, clausis 
ianuis, exclusis excommunicatis et interdictis, non pulsatis cam- 
panis, suppressa uoce diuina officia celebrare. In parocliialibus 
uero ecclesiis quas habetis, liceat uobis sacerdotes eligere, et 
diocesanis episcopis presentare, quibus si idonei fuerint episcopi 
curam animarum committant, ut eis de spiritualibus, vobis uero 
de temporalibus, debeant respondere. Crisma, uero, oleum 
sanctum, Consecraciones altarium seu basilicarum, ordinaciones 
clericorum qui ad sacros ordines fuerint promouendi a diocesano 
suscipietis episcopo si quidem catholicus fuerit, et graciam et 
communionem apostolice sedis habuerit, et ea uobis uoluerit 
sine pravitate qualibet exhibere. Alioquin liceat uobis quem- 
cunque malueritis catholicum adire antistitem, graciam et 
communionem apostolice sedis habentem, qui nostra fretus 
auctoritate vobis quod postulatur impendat. Obeunte uero te 
nunc eiusdem loci abbate, uel tuorum quolibet successorum, 
nullus ibi qualibet surrepcionis astucia seu uiolencia preponatur, 
nisi quern fratres communi consensu uel fratrum maior pars 
consilij sanioris secundum dei timorern et Beati benedicti regu- 
lam prouiderint eligendum. Prohibemus eciam ne quis in uos 
uel monasterium vestrum excommunicacionis, suspensions uel 
interdicti sentenciam, sine manifesta et racionabili causa, pro- 



BULL OF POPE CELESTINE III. 105 

mulgare presumat. Interdicimus, autem, lit nulli licitum sit 
infra terminos parochiarum vestrarum ecclesiam, cimiterium, 
oratorium uel xenodochium de nouo construere, seu constructa 
alij subdere, absque vestro et diocesani episcopi assensu, saluis 
priuilegiis romanorum pontificum. Sepulturam, preterea, 
ipsius loci liberam esse decernimus, ut eorum deuocioni et 
extreme uoluntati qui se illic sepelliri deliberauerint, nisi forte 
excommunicati uel interdict! sint, nullus obsistat, salua tamen 
iusticia illarum ecclesiarum a quibus mortuorum corpora 
assumuntur. Decernimus ergo ut nullis a omnino hominum fas !l 
sit personas vestras seu monasterium ipsum temere perturbare, 
uel nouis et indebitis exaccionibus fatigare; aut hanc nostre 
paginam confirmacionis, exempcionis et constitutionis infrin- 
gere, uel ei ausu temerario contraire : Si quis autem hoc 
attemptare presumpserit, indignacionem omnipotentis dei et 
beatorum Petri et Pauli apostolorum eius se nouerit incur- 
surum. Ad indicium, autem, huius a sede apostolica libertatis 
percepte duos bisancios uobis et successoribus nostris annis 
singulis persoluetis. Datum Lateran., viij Id. Marcij, Ponti- 
ficatus nostri anno quarto. 

(Abstract) 
' CELESTINE'S GREAT CHAIITER of EXEMPTION, ' 

CELESTINE, bishop, servant of the servants of God, to the abbot and 
brethren of the monastery of Lundors, etc. Having learned of the 
foundation and endowment of the monastery by ' Earl David, brother of 
our dearest son in Christ, William, the illustrious King of Scotland,' 
the Pope desires to promote his pious intentions ; and therefore he 
exempts the monastery from the jurisdiction of all whomsoever, and 
takes it ' into the jurisdiction and possession of Blessed Peter.' He first 
decrees that the monastic order there instituted ' according to God and 
the rule of Blessed Benedict' should there for ever be inviolably observed. 

Further, all the possessions and goods which the monastery then 
justly and peaceably possessed, as well as those which might be after- 
wards acquired by the grants of pontiffs, the munificence of kings and 
princes, the offerings of the faithful, or by other just means, should 
remain secure and inviolate to the monks and their successors. Of 
these possessions the Pope judges that these following should be named : 
the place in which the monastery is situated, with all its pertinents ; 
'' a free court on your lands and firm peace within the marches of the 
vill of Lundors itself, as the charter of the earl himself testifies' ; the 



106 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

church of Lundors and its pertinents, and the land pertaining- to the 
church, and the other lands in the same vill which are contained in the 
earl's charter ; the easements of the island which is called Redinche, 
for their use as for the use of the earl ; a fishery in the Tay near the 
aforesaid island ; the mill of the vill of Lundors with all its suit and 
multure ; the church of Dundee ; a toft in the burgh of Dundee., free of 
all service and exaction ; beyond the Mounth, Fintrith, and the church 
of the same vill ; and in Garviach, Ledhgavel, and Malind ; and the 
church of Rothket with its chapels of Inveruryri and Munkegin, and 
with its other pertinents ; the church of Durnach ; the church of Frame ; 
the church of Radmuriel ; the church of Ingemabanin ; the church of 
Culsamuel ; and in the bishopric of Lincoln the church of Cunigton ; 
the church of Kelalcmund ; with the chapels of the same churches, their 
lands, tithes, and all their pertinents 'for your own use and main- 
tenance ' ; and a toft in the burgh of Inveruryn, free and quit of all 
service and exaction ; the tithe of all profits and issues of the earl's 
courts, both within and without his lands beyond the Mounth, which he 
had in the time when he made this gift ; and a tithe of all the profits 
which come to the earl from the profits of the king throughout his 
whole kingdom ; and a tithe of all the property of the earl and his heirs 
beyond the Mounth. 

Further, of the gift of the king, a full toft in his burgh of Berwick ; a 
full toft in his burgh of Stirling ; a full toft in his burgh of Carel ; a full 
toft in his burgh of Perth ; a full toft in his burgh of Forfar ; a full toft 
in his burgh of Munros, and a full toft in his burgh of Aberdeen. 

Further, of the gift of Robert of London, son of the said king, a full 
toft in the burgh of Inverkeythyn. 

All these things are to be possessed as in the charters of the donors is 
contained, and are confirmed to the monks of Lundors by apostolic 
authority. 

' Let no one presume to exact or extort tithes from the fallow-lands 
(novaliis) which ye have brought under cultivation by your own hands 
or at your own cost, or tithes of the increase of your animals.' 

It is lawful for the monks of Lundors to receive and retain without 
gainsaying clerks and laymen, if they be free and released, who fly from 
the world to the monastic life (ad conversionem). It shall not be lawful 
for any of the brethren, after having made his profession at Lundors, to 
leave that place without the permission of the abbot, unless it be with 
a view to enter a monastic order of stricter rule. Let no one dare to 
retain any one leaving the monastery without the precaution of common 
letters. 

When the land is subjected to a general interdict, it shall be lawful 
for the monks to celebrate the divine offices in a low voice (suppressa 
voce), with closed doors, persons under sentence of excommunication 
and interdict having been excluded, and without the ringing of bells. 

For the parish churches which they have, it shall be lawful for the 
monks to elect priests, and to present them to the bishops of the 



BULL OF POPE INNOCENT III. 107 

dioceses, to which priests, if they shall be fit, the bishops may commit 
the cure of souls, ' so that these parish clergy may answer to the bishops 
in spirituals, and to you in temporals.' 

Chrism, holy oil, consecrations of altars and of churches, and the 
ordinations of clerks who should be advanced to holy orders are to be 
obtained by the monastery from the bishop of the diocese, if he be 
Catholic and possess the favour and fellowship of the Apostolic See, 
and is willing to grant these things without any pravity. Failing the 
diocesan bishop they might go to any bishop whom they preferred, who 
was Catholic and possessed the favour and fellowship of the Apostolic See, 
who, relying on the Pope's authority, would grant them what they sought. 

On the death of the abbot that now is, or of any of his successors, no 
one may be advanced to that office by deceit or violence. The brethren 
by common consent, k or else the majority of the brethren, of saner 
counsel, shall provide that the abbot be elected in accordance with the 
fear of God and the rule of Blessed Benedict. 

The Pope prohibits any one from presuming to promulgate a sentence 
of excommunication, suspension, or interdict, against the brethren or 
their monastery without manifest and reasonable cause. 

It shall not be lawful for any to make a church, burying-ground, 
hospice (xenodochium), or oratory within the bounds of the parishes of 
the monastery, or to subject those already made to another, without the 
assent of the monks and that of the bishop of the diocese, saring the 
privileges of the Roman pontiffs. Sepulture in the place itself shall be 
free, so that none may oppose the devotion and last will of those who 
shall choose to be buried there, unless they happen to be excommuni- 
cated or under interdict, saving always the just claim (justicia) of those 
churches from which the bodies of the dead are taken. 

It shall not be lawful for any one to rashly disturb the monks or the 
monastery, or to harass them with new and undue exactions, or to 
infringe or rashly contravene this writ of the Pope's confirmation, 
exemption, and constitution. ' But if any one shall presume to attempt 
this, let him know that he will incur the indignation of Almighty God 
and of Blessed Peter and Paul, His Apostles. ' In token of this liberty 
received from the Apostolic See the monks are to pay yearly to the Pope 
and his successors two bezants. 

Given at the Lateran, viij. Ides of March [March 8] in the fourth 
year of our pontificate [i.e. A.D. 1195]. 1 

XCIV 

Magnum priuilegium Innocencii tercij. | [/*/. 67.} 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorurn Dei, Dilectis filiis 
Guidoni Abbati monastery sancte marie de Lundors, eiusque 

1 Celestine in. began his pontificate, I4th April 1191. 



108 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

fratribus tarn presentibus quam futuris regularem uitam pro- 
fessis in perpetuum. Religiosam uitam eligentibus apostolicum 
conuenit adesse presidium, ne forte cuiuslibet temeritatis 
incursus aut eos a proposito reuocet, aut robur, quod absit, 
sacre religionis infringat. Ea propter, Dilecti in domino filij, 
uestris iustis postulacionibus clementer annuimus, et prefatum 
monasterium sancte marie de Lundors in quo diuino estis 
obsequio mancipati sub beati petri et nostra proteccione sus- 
cipimus, et presentis script! priuilegio communimus. In 
primis siquidem statuentes ut ordo monasticus, qui secundum 
deum et beati benedicti regulam in eodem monasterio insti- 
tutus esse dinoscitur, perpetuis ibidem temporibus inuiola- 
biliter obseruetur. Preterea quascunque possess! ones, quecunque 
bona idem monasterium in presenciarum iuste et canonice 
possidet, aut in futurum concessione pontificum, largicione 
regum uel principum, oblacione fidelium, seu aliis iustis modis, 
prestante domino, poterit adipisci, firma uobis vestrisque suc- 
cessoribus, et illibata permaneant. In quibus hec propriis 
duximus exprimenda uocabulis : Locum ipsum in quo pre- 
fatum monasterium a dilecto filio nobili uiro Dauid Comite, 
f rat re Karissimi in Christo filij nostri W. illustris Scocie Regis, 
constructum est cum omnibus pertinenciis suis per suas rectas 
diuisas, et liberam curiam in terra uestra et firmam pacem 
infra diuisas ipsius uille de Lundors, sicut carta predicti 
Comitis protestatur : Ecclesiam quoque eiusdem uille de 
Lundors cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, scilicet, capellas de 
Dundemor, et terrain ad predictam ecclesiam pertinentem per 
suas rectas diuisas, et alias terras in eadem uilla, sicut in carta 
eiusdem Comitis continetur : Insulam que uocatur Redinche, 
et piscarias in they iuxta prenominatam insulam : Molen- 
dinum de Lundors cum omni secta sua et multura : Ecclesiam 
quoque de Dunde cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, et terram ad 
eandem ecclesiam pertinentem, et vnum toftum in burgo de 
Dunde liberum et quietum ab omni seruicio et exaccione, et 
vnam karucatam terre in uilla de Newtile, et in uilla de 
Perth terram que uocatur Insula : Ultra Moneth, fintreth 
per suas rectas diuisas, cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, ecclesiam 
eiusdem uille, cum omnibus pertinenciis suis : In Garuiach, 
Ledgauel et Malind cum omnibus pertinenciis suis per suas 






j^w^Mte!^!^ 

pit 4Eotttti 

<bs* 




FoL. 67 r<r/tf (NO. XCIV) 



BULL OF POPE INNOCENT III. 109 

rectas diuisas : Ecclesiam de Rothketh cum capellis suis, 
scilicet Inuerurin et munkegin, et aliis pertinenciis suis : 
Ecclesiam de Durnach, ecclesiam de prame, ecclesiam de Rath- 
muriel, ecclesiam de Inchemabanin, ecclesiam de Culsamuel : 
In episcopatu lincolniensi ecclesiam de Cunigtone, ecclesiam de 
Wissindene : In episcopatu de Stratheren, ecclesiam de Mothel ; 
ecclesiam de Kelalcmund, cum capellis predictarum ecclesiarum 
et terris et decimis, ac omnibus earum pertinenciis ad proprios 
usus monachorum concessis, et vnum plenarium toftum in burgo 
de Inuerurin, liberum et quietum ab omni seruicio et exaccione : 
Decimas omnes quas habetis in terra predict! Comitis et 
extra: Ex donacione quoque Regis Scocie, vnum plenarium 
toftum in burgo de Berewic, et aliud plenarium toftum in 
burgo de Striuelin, plenarium toftum in burgo de Karel, 
plenarium toftum in burgo de Perth, plenarium toftum in 
burgo de forfare, plenarium toftum in burgo de Munros, et 
vnum plenarium toftum in burgo de Aberden, et terrain unam 
in uilla de Perth, in libero burgagio. Sane noualium ves- 
trorum, que propriis manibus et sumptibus colitis, siue de 
nutrimentis animalium vestrorum, nullus a uobis decimas 
exigere uel extorquere presumat. Liceat quoque vobis clericos 
uel laicos liberos et absolutes e | seculo fugientes, ad conver- [f i. 68.] 
sionem recipere, et eos absque con trad icci one aliqua retinere. 
Prohibemus insuper ut nulli fratrum uestrorum post factam 
in eodem loco professionem fas sit absque abbatis sui licencia 
de eodem loco, nisi arcioris religionis obtentu, discedere. Dis- 
cedentem uero absque communi litterarum caucione nullus 
audeat retinere. Cum autem generale interdictum terre fuerit, 
liceat uobis clausis ianuis, exclusis excommunicatis et interdic- 
tis, non pulsatis campanis, suppressa uoce diuina officia cele- 
brare. Crisma, uero, oleum sanctum, consecraciones altarium 
seu Basilicarum, ordinaciones Monachorum seu clericorum 
uestrorum qui ad sacros ordines fuerint promouendi, a diocesano 
episcopo vobis sine prauitate aliqua precipimus exhiberi. 
Sepulturam preterea ipsius loci liberam esse decernimus, ut 
eorum deuocioni et extreme uoluntati qui se illic sepeliri 
deliberauerint, nisi forte excommunicati uel interdicti sint, 
nullus obsistat, Salua tamen [iusticia] illarum ecclesiarum a 
quibus mortuorum corpora assumuntur. Prohibemus, insuper, 



110 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ut infra fines parochie vestre nullus sine assensu diocesani 
episcopi et vestro Capellam seu oratorium de nouo construere 
audeat, saluis priuilegiis romanorum pontificum. Ad hec eciam 
inhibemus ne quis in uos uel monasterium vestrum excom- 
municacionis, suspensionis, uel interdicti sentenciam absque 
manifesta et racionabili causa promulgare presumat. Obeunte 
uero te nunc eiusdem loci abbate uel tuorum quolibet succes- 
sorum, nullus ibi qualibet surrepcionis astucia seu uiolencia 
preponatur, nisi quern fratres communi consensu uel fratrum 
maior pars consilij sanioris secundum dei timorem et beati 
benedicti regulam prouiderint eligendum. Decernimus ergo 
ut nullis omnino hominum liceat prefatum monasterium temere 
perturbare, aut eius possessiones auferre uel ablatas retinere, 
minuere, seu quibuscunque uexacionibus fatigare, set omnia 
integra conseruentur eorum pro quorum gubernacione ac sus- 
tentacione concessa sunt usibus omnimodis profutura, salua 
sedis apostolice auctoritate, et diocesani episcopi canonica 
iusticia. Si qua igitur in futurum ecclesiastica secularisue 
persona hanc nostre constitucionis paginam sciens contra earn 
temere uenire temptauerit secundo tercioue commonita, nisi 
reatum suum congrua satisfaccione correxerit, potestatis 
honorisque sui dignitate careat, reamque se diuino iudicio 
existere de perpetrata iniquitate cognoscat et a sacratissimo 
corpore ac sanguine dei et domini Redemptoris nostri ihesu 
Christi aliena fiat, atque in extremo examine districte ulcioni 
subiaciat. Cunctis autem eidem loco sua iura seruantibus sit 
pax domini nostri ihesu Christi, quatinus et hie fructum bone 
accionis percipiant, et apud districtum iudicem premia eterne 
pacis inueniant, Amen. 

Desubscrip- {[ EGO Innocencius Catholice ecclesie episcopus subscribo. 
lium. Ego ottavianus hostiensis et velletrensis Episcopus subscribo. 

fl[ Ego Petrus portuensis et sancte rufine episcopus subscribo. 
Ego Pandulphus Basilice xij. apostolorum presbyter cardinalis, 
subscribo. 

C Ego Petrus tt. sancte Ceciliae presbyter cardinalis sub- 
scribo. Ego Jordanus sancte pudenciane tt. pastoris presbyter 
cardinalis subscribo. 

fl[ Ego Johannes tt. sancti dementis cardinalis viterbiensis 



BULL OF POPE INNOCENT III. Ill 

et tuscan. episcopus subscribe. Ego Guido sancte marie 
transtiberim, tt. calixti presbyter cardinalis subscribe. C Ego 
hugo presbyter cardinalis sancti martini tt. equicij subscribe. 
Ego sosfredus tt. sancte praxedis presbyter cardinalis subscribo. 
Ego Johannes tt. sancte prisce presbyter cardinalis sub- 
scribo. Ego Gracianus sanctorum Cosme et Damiani diaconus 
cardinalis subscribo. fl[ Ego Gregorius sancte marie in aquiro 
diaconus cardinalis subscribo. Ego Gregorius sancti georgij 
ad velum aureum Diaconus Cardinalis subscribo. C Ego 
Nicholaus sancte marie Incosmidyn Diaconus Cardinalis sub- 
scribo. Ego Bobo sancti theodorij Diaconus Cardinalis sub- [/<?/. 69.] 
scribo. Dat. Lateran. per manum Raynaldi, domini pape 
Notarij, Cancellarij vicem agentis : xiij. kl. aprilis; Indiccione 
prima; Incarnacionis dominice anno M.C.XC.VIII, Ponti- 
ficatus vero Domini Innocencii pape tercii anno secundo. 

(Abstract) 
'THE GREAT PRIVILEGE of INNOCENT ui.' l 

INNOCENT, bishop, servant of the servants of God, etc., to Guido, Abbot 
of the monastery of St. Mary of Lundors, and the brethren, etc. The 
Pope takes the monastery ' under the protection of Blessed Peter and of 
us.' He first decrees that the Benedictine rule should be inviolably 
observed [in the language of xcin.]. The possessions of the monastery 
are to remain inviolate [in the language of xcin.]. After specifying 
Lundors and its church, we find the addition of f the chapels of 
Dundemor/ as pertinents of the church of Lundors. Further additions 
are a ploughgate of land in the vill of Newtile, and in Perth the land 
which is called Inch (insula). The property beyond the Mounth and in 
Garviach remain as specified in xcin. The church of Wissendene is 
added to the church of Cunigtone, both in the diocese of Lincoln. ' In 
the bishopric of Strathern, the church of Mothel ; and the church of 
Kelalcmund, with the chapels of the aforesaid churches.' To the dona- 
tions of King William, as given in xcin., is added ' one land in the town 
of Perth, in free burgage. ' Other variations of language from xcin. are 
as follows : f We prohibit any one daring to erect a chapel or oratory 
within the bounds of your parish without the assent of the bishop of the 
diocese and your assent ; saving the privileges of the Roman Pontiffs.' 

Chrism, holy oil, consecrations of churches, and ordinations of monks 
and clerks to holy orders e we command to be supplied to you by the 



1 This Bull is for the most part a repetition of the Bull of Pope Celestine 
(xcin.), and it has been thought sufficient to notice the differences. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

bishop of the diocese without any pravity.' In the clause dealing with 
the erection of churches or oratories within the hounds of their parishes 
the word ' hospice ' (xenodochium) is omitted. After the passage 
threatening punishment here and hereafter to those who would infringe 
this papal constitution, there is added : e But may the peace of our 
Lord Jesus Christ be to all who preserve its rights to the same place 
[i.e. the monastery of Lundors], to the end that here they may receive 
the fruit of their good deed, and in the presence of the strict Judge may 
find the reward of peace. Amen.' 

I, Innocent, Bishop of the Catholic Church, subscribe. I, Octavian, 
Bishop of Ostia and Velletri, subscribe. 

I, Peter, Bishop of Porto and St. Rufina, subscribe. I, Pandulf, 
cardinal priest of the basilica of the Twelve Apostles, subscribe. 

I, Peter, cardinal priest of the title of St. Cecilia, subscribe. I, 
Jordan, cardinal priest of St. Pudentiana, of the title of Pastor, 
subscribe. 

I, John, cardinal, of the title of St. Clement, Bishop of Viterbo and 
Tuscana [Toscanella], subscribe. I, Guido, of St. Maria Transtyberim, 
of the title of Calixtus, cardinal priest, subscribe. 

I, Hugo, cardinal priest of St. Martin, of the title of Equitius, 
subscribe. I, Sosfred, of the title of St. Praxedis, cardinal priest, 
subscribe. 

I, John, of the title of St. Prisca, cardinal priest, subscribe. I, 
Gracian, of SS. Cosmas and Damian, cardinal deacon, subscribe. 

I, Gregory, of St. Maria in aquiro, cardinal deacon, subscribe. I, 
Gregory, of St. George ad Velum Aureum, cardinal deacon, subscribe. 

I, Nicholas, of St. Maria in Cosmedin, cardinal deacon, subscribe. I, 
Bobo, of St. Theodorius, cardinal deacon, subscribe. 

Given at the Lateran, by the hand of Raynald, notary of our Lord the 
Pope, acting for the Chancellor ; xiij. Kalends of April [March 20] first 
indiction ; in the year of our Lord's Incarnation MCXCVIII., the second 
year of the pontificate of our Lord, Pope Innocent in. 1 



xcv 

De Bonis in Strathern Innocencius tercius. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et conuentui monasterij de Lundors, Salutem et apostoli- 
cam benediccionem. Cum a nobis petitur quod iustum est et 
honestum tarn uigor equitatis quam ordo exigit racionis 



1 That is 1198-9. According to our present mode of reckoning, the date of 
this Bull is 2Oth March 1199. Innocent in. was elected on the day of the 
death of his predecessor, 8th Jan., and consecrated 22nd Feb. 1198. 



BULL OF POPE INNOCENT III. 113 

ut id per sollicitudinem officij nostri ad debitum perducatur 
effectum. Ea propter, Dilecti in domino filij, uestris iustis 
postulacionibus grato concurrentes assensu personas vestras a et a MS. vestras 
monasterium in quo diuino estis obsequio mancipati, cum ve 
omnibus bonis que in presenciarum racionabiliter possidetis, 
aut in futurum iustis modis, prestante domino, poteritis 
adipisci, sub petri beati et nostra proteccione suscipimus, 
specialiter autem uillam et ecclesiam de Eglesmagrille cum 
decimis de cletheueys, quas venerabilis frater noster Abraham 
episcopus ac dilecti filij capitulum Dumblanense uestro mona- 
sterio concesserunt ; Et ecclesiam cum pertinenciis suis, terras 
de Ratengoden, Neutile, hameldune, et mernes, cum piscaria 
in Sabulo, et pertinenciis earundem ; Farinam quoque Braseum, 
caseos et porcos annuos, que M. quondam frater Nobilis uiri 
G. Comitis de Strathern pia uobis liberalitate concessit, sicut 
ea omnia iuste ac pacifice possidetis, uobis et per uos dicto 
monasterio vestro auctoritate apostolica confirmamus, et pre- 
sentis scripti patrocinio communimus. Nulli ergo omnino 
hominum liceat hanc paginam nostre proteccionis et confirma- 
cionis infringere uel ei ausu temerario contraire. Si quis 
autem hoc attemptare presumpserit, indignacionem omnipo- 
tentis dei et beatorum petri et pauli apostolorum eius se 
nouerit incursurum. Datum Lateran. x Kalend. februarij, 
Pontificatus nostri anno septimo decimo. 



(Abstract) 
INNOCENT in., of possessions in STRATHERN. 

INNOCENT, to the abbot and convent of the monastery of Lundors. 
Assenting to their just requests, he takes ' under the protection of 
Blessed Peter and of us ' the persons of the abbot and monks, and 
the monastery in which they were bound to the service of God, and all 
their possessions, as well those now reasonably held by them as those 
which in future they might with God's assistance be able to obtain by 
just means, specially the vill and church of Eglesmagril, with the tithes 
of Cletheueys, ' which our venerable brother, Abraham, the bishop, and 
our beloved sons, the Chapter of Dunblane, granted to your monastery ' ; 
and the church with its pertinents and the lands of Ratengoden, Neutile, 
Hameldune, and Mernes ; with a fishery in Sands (in Sabulo), and the 
pertinents of the same ; the meal and malt, the cheeses and swine, year 

H 



114 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

by year, which M., late brother of the noble man, G., Earl of Strathern, 
granted to you with pious liberality. As all these things are now justly 
and peaceably possessed by you, we by apostolic authority confirm to 
you, and, through you, to your monastery aforesaid, and make secure 
by the protection of the present writ. It is not lawful for any man to 
infringe, etc. But if any one shall presume, etc. ' Given at the Lateran, 
on x Kal. February [Jan. 23], in the seventeenth year of our 
pontificate.' l 

XCVI 

Confirmacio composicionis super ecclesiis 
de Garuiach. 

HONORIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis Abbati 
et conuentui monasterij de Lundors, salutem et apostolicam 
benediccionem. Ea que iudicio uel concordia statuuntur, firma 
debent et illibata consistere, et ne in recidiue contencionis 
scrupulum relabantur, apostolico conuenit presidio communiri. 
Ea propter, Dilecti in domini filij, uestris iustis postulacionibus 
grato concurrentes assensu composicionem que inter uos, ex 
parte una, et venerabilem fratrem nostrum episcopum Sancti 
Andree ex altera, super quarundem terrarum redditibus in loco 
qui Garuihac dicitur positarum, mediantibus . . abbate de 
Aberbrothoc et magistro Laurencio Sancti Andree, et W. 
Laudonie, archidiaconis, amicabiliter interuenit, sicut rite sine 
prauitate prouide facta est, et ab utraque parte recepta et 
hactenus pacifice obseruata, et in litteris inde confectis plenius 
continetur, auctoritate apostolica confirmamus, et presentis 
scripti patrocinio communimus. Nulli ergo omnino hominum 
liceat hanc paginam nostre confirmacionis infringere, uel ei 
ausu temerario contraire. Si quis autem hoc attemptare pre- 
sumpserit, indignacionem omnipotentis dei et Beatorum Petri 
et Pauli apostolorum eius se nouerit incursurum. Datum 
Lateran. xij Kal. Marcij, Pontificatus nostri anno xj. 

(Abstract) 
CONFIRMATION of an AGREEMENT as to the CHURCHES of GARVIACH. 

HONORIUS [in.], bishop, servant, etc., to the abbot and convent, etc. 
Assenting gladly to their just requests, the Pope confirms the agreement 
(compositionem) between the monks, of the one part, and the Bishop of 

1 1214-15. 



BULLS OF HONORIUS III. AND GREGORY IX. 115 

St. Andrews, of the other part, as to the revenues of certain lands e situated 
in the place which is called Garviach,' an agreement arrived at through the 
friendly intervention of ... Abbot of Aberbrothoc, Master Laurence, 
Archdeacon of St. Andrews, and W., Archdeacon of Lothian, as it was 
duly made ' without pravity/ and was received and observed up to the 
present by both parties. ' It shall not be lawful for any man/ etc. 
' Given at the Lateran, xii. Kalends of March [Feb. 18], in the eleventh 
year of our pontificate.' 1 

XCVII 
De composicione terrarum ecclesiarum de Garuiach. 

GREGORIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et conuentui Monastery de Lundors, salutem et apostoli- 
cam Benediccionem. Justis petencium desideriis dignum est 
nos facilem prebere consensum, et uota que a racionis tramite 
non discordant effectu prosequente complere. Ea propter, 
Dilecti in Domino filij, nostris iustis | post ulacioni bus grato [fol. 70.} 
concurrentes assensu, composicionem que inter uos ex parte 
vna et venerabilem fratrem nostrum Episcopum Sancti Andree 
ex altera, super redditibus quarundem terrarum in loco qui 
Garuiach dicitur positarum, median tibus abbate de Aber- 
brothoc, et magistro Laurencio Sancti Andree et Willelmo 
Laudonie, archidiaconis, amicabiliter interuenit, sicut sine 
prauitate provide facta est, et sponte ab utraque parte 
recepta, et in litteris inde confectis plenius continetur, auctori- 
tate apostolica confirmamus, et presentis scripti patrocinio 
communimus. Nulli ergo omnino hominum liceat hanc 
paginam nostre confirmacionis infringere, uel ei ausu temerario 
contraire. Si quis autem hoc attemptare presumpserit, indig- 
nacionem omnipotentis dei et Beatorum Petri et Pauli aposto- 
lorum eius se nouerit incursurum. Datum Lateran. vij 
Kalend. Junii, Pontificatus nostri anno Primo. 

(Abstract} 
OF the AGREEMENT as to the CHUBCHLANDS of GARVIACH. 

GREGORY [ix.], bishop, servant, etc., to the abbot and convent, etc. 
The Pope repeats the confirmation of Hoiiorius [xcvi.]. Given at the 
Lateran, vii. Kalends of June [May 26], in the first year of our pontificate. 2 

1 i8th February 1226-27. Honorius III. died a month later, March l8th. 
Gregory ix. was elected igth and consecrated 2ist March 1227. 



116 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

XCVIII 

De ecclesia de Dunde et aliis bonis. 

GREGORIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum del, Dilectis abbati et 
conuentui monasterij de Lundors ordinis sancti Benedicti, 
sancti andree diocesis, Salutem et apostolicam Benediccionem. 
Justis petencium desideriis Dignum est nos facilem prebere 
consensum, et uota que a racionis tramite non discordant 
effectu prosequente complere. Ea propter, Dilecti in domino 
filij, uestris iustis postulacionibus grato concurrentes assensu, 
personas uestras et monasterium de Lundors in quo diuino 
uacatis obsequio, cum omnibus bonis que in presenciarum 
racionabiliter possidet, aut in futurum iustis modis, prestante 
domino, poterit adipisci, sub Beati Petri et nostra proteccione 
suscipimus ; Specialiter, autem, ecclesiam de Dunde, quam 
venerabilis frater noster Episcopus Brechinensis, spectantem 
ad eum, capituli sui accedente consensu, dicto monasterio pia 
et prouida liberalitate donauit, prout in ipsorum litteris con- 
fectis exinde dicitur contineri, necnon libertates et immunitates 
secularium exaccionum a Regibus, Comitibus, et Baronibus 
Scocie, aliisque Christi fidelibus pia uobis liberalitate concessas ; 
Terras quoque possessiones et alia bona uestra sicut ea omnia 
iuste ac pacifice obtinetis, Vobis et eidem monasterio per uos 
auctoritate apostolica confirmamus, et presentis scripti patro- 
cinio communimus. Prouiso ut de predicte ecclesie prouenti- 
bus sacerdoti perpetuo in ea domino seruituro congrua porcio 
assignetur, ex qua comode sustentari ualeat, ac episcopalia et 
alia onera ecclesie supportare. Nulli ergo hominum omnino 
liceat hanc paginam nostre proteccionis et confirmacionis 
infringere uel ei ausu temerario contraire. Si quis autem hoc 
attemptare presumpserit, indignacionem omnipotentis dei et 
Beatorum Petri et Pauli [apostolorum] eius se nouerit incursu- 
rum. Datum Lateran. xvj Kalendas Marcij, Pontificatus nostri 
anno Duodecimo. 

(Abstract) 

OF the CHURCH of DUNDEE, and other possessions. 

GREGORY [ix.], bishop, servant of the servants, etc., to the abbot and 
convent of Lundors, etc. Concurring with their just requests, the Pope 
takes their persons, their monastery, and their possessions under the 



BULLS OF GREGORY IX. AND INNOCENT IV. 117 

protection of St. Peter and himself: and specially the church of 
Dundee, which the Bishop of Brechin, with the consent of his chapter, 
granted to the monastery of Lundors, as is said to he contained in 
lettei's di-awn up thereupon. Likewise, the Pope confirms to them the 
liberties and immunities from secular exactions, which, with pious 
liberality, had been granted by the kings, earls, and barons of Scot- 
land, and by others of the faithful of Christ. Provided that out of the 
revenues of the aforesaid church of Dundee a fitting portion should be 
assigned to a priest who would continue to serve the Lord in it. Out of 
which portion he might be conveniently maintained, and be able to 
support the burden of bishop's dues (episcopalia) and other burdens of 
the church. ' It is not lawful to any man to infringe, etc. But if 
any shall presume, etc. Given at the Lateran, xvi. Kalends of March 
[Feb. 14], in the twelfth year of our pontificate.' *] 

XCIX 

Super ecclesia de Dunde de mutacione Keledeorum. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et conuentui Monasterij de Lundors, ordinis sancti 
Benedicti, Sancti Andree diocesis, Salutem et apostolicam Bene- 
diccionem. Officij nostri sollicitudo requirit ut uiros religiosos 
qui, relictis seculi uanitatibus, se diuinis obsequiis deuouerunt, 
quantum cum deo possimus, in omnibus foueamus. Cum igitur, 
sicut ex parte uestra fuit propositum coram nobis quondam 
Dauid comite huntindone, monasterij uestri fundatore, ius pat- 
ronatus quod habebat in ecclesia de Dunde, Brechinensis 
diocesis, vobis et per uos monasterio uestro liberaliter confer- 
ente, loci diocesanus, capituli sui accedente consensu, eandem 
ecclesiam in proprios usus uestros duxerit concedendam, et quod 
per eundem episcopum taliter factum extitit in hac parte per 
apostolicam sedem fuerit postmodum confirmatum, deuocionis 
| uestre supplicacionibus inclinati, presencium vobis auctoritate t/ y/ - 7L \ 
concedimus, ut ex eo quod fratres, qui consueuerunt esse in 
ecclesia Brechinensi, Keledei uocati fuerunt, nunc, mutato 
uocabulo, sunt canonici nuncupati, nullum super premissis 
uobis et monasterio memorato possit preiudicium generari : Et 
hoc eciam non obstante quod super hiis rite factum est, firmum 
et stabile in perpetuum perseueret. Nulli ergo omnino 
hominum liceat hanc paginam nostre concessionis infringere 
1 That is, 1238-39. 



118 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

uel ei ausu temerario contraire. Si quis, autem, hoc attemp- 
tare presumpserit, indignacionem omnipotentis del et Beatorum 
Petri et Pauli apostolorum eius se nouerit incursurum. Datum 
Lugdun. xij Kalend. Marcij, Pontificatus nostri anno septimo. 

(Abstract) 

' ON the CHURCH of DUNDEE, concerning 1 the changing of the KELEDEI.' 
INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, servant of the servants, etc., to the abbot 
and convent, etc. Since, as was stated before us on your behalf, the 
late David, Earl of Huntingdon, founder of your monastery, liberally 
conferred on you, and, through you, on your monastery, the right of 
patronage which he had in the church of Dundee, in the diocese of 
Brechin, and the diocesan of the place, with the consent of his chapter, 
considered that the same church should be granted to you for your own 
uses (inproprios usus), and what was done by the same bishop in this respect 
was presently confirmed by the Apostolic See, we, inclined by your devout 
supplications, grant by the authority of these presents that no prejudice 
shall be created to you and your monastery in respect to the aforesaid 
from the fact that the brethren who have been accustomed to be in the 
church of Brechin were called Keledei and now by change of name are 
styled canons. This notwithstanding, what has been duly done in regard 
to the aforesaid shall remain firm and established for ever. It is not 
lawful for any man to infringe, etc. But if any one presume, etc. 
Given at Lyons, xij. Kalends of March [Feb. 18], in the seventh year of 
our pontificate. l 



Super ecclesia de Dunde de mutacione Keledeorum. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum del, Dilectis filiis 
abbati de Dunfermelyn, et Priori de May sancti andreediocesis 
Salutern et apostolicam Benediccionem. Officij nostri sollicitudo 
requirit ut uiros religiosos qui relictis seculi uanitatibus se 
diuinis obsequiis deuouerunt, quantum cum deo possuimus, in 
omnibus foueamus. Cum igitur sicut ex parte dilectorum 
filiorum abbatis et conuentus monasterij de Lundors ordinis 
sancti Benedicti, Sancti Andree diocesis, fuit propositum coram 
nobis, quondam Dauid Comite Huntindonie ipsius monasterij 
fundatore ius patronatus quod habebat in ecclesia de Dunde, 
Brechinensis diocesis, eis et per eos eidem monasterio libera- 

1 Innocent IV. was elected 24th and consecrated 28th June 1243, so the date 
of the above is i8th February 1249-50. 



BULLS OF INNOCENT IV. 119 

liter conferente, loci diocesanus, capituli sui accedente consensu, 
eandem ecclesiam in proprios eorum usus duxerit concedendam, 
et quod per eundem episcopum taliter factum extitit in hac 
parte, per apostolicam fuerit sedem postmodum confirmatum, 
eorundem abbatis et conuentus supplicacionibus inclinati per 
nostras eis litteras duximus concedendum, ut ex eo quod fratres, 
qui consueuerunt esse in ecclesia Brechinensi, Keledei uocati 
fuerunt, nunc mutato uocabulo sunt canonici nuncupati, nullum 
super premissis sibi et monasterio memorato possit preiudicium 
generari, et hoc eciam non obstante quod super hiis rite 
factum est, firmum et stabile in perpetuum perseu[er]et. 
Ideoque discrecioni uestre per apostolica scripta mandamus 
quatinus prefatos abbatem et conuentum non permittatis 
contra concessionis nostre tenorem super hiis ab aliquibus 
indebite molestari, molestatores huiusmodi per censuram 
ecclesiasticam, apellacione postposita, compescendo. Quod si 
non ambo hiis exequendis potueritis interesse, alter uestrum ea 
nichillominus exequatur. Datum Lugdun. xij kalend. Maij, 
Pontificatus nostri anno septimo. 

(Abstract) 
' ON the CHURCH of DUNDEE, concerning the changing of the KELEDEI.' 

INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, servant of the servants of God, to our beloved 
sons, the Abbot of Dunfermline and the Prior of the May of the diocese 
of St. Andrews, etc. [The facts are recited in the language of xcix. 
down to the words ' firm and established for ever.'] 'Wherefore we 
enjoin on your discretion by apostolic writ that ye do not permit the 
aforesaid abbot and convent to be troubled without just cause, contrary 
to the tenor of our concession in this respect, by restraining those who 
give such trouble by means of the censure of the Church, appeal being 
postponed. Which if both of you cannot engage in executing, let the 
other, nevertheless, execute the same. Given at Lyons, xii. Kalends 
of May [April 20], in the seventh year of our pontificate.' l 

CI 
Confirmacio generalis Innocencij quarti. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et conuentui monasterij de Lundors ordinis Sancti Bene- 
dicti, Sancti Andree diocesis, Salutem et apostolicam Benedicci- 

1 A.D. 1250. 



120 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

onem. Sacrosancta romana ecclesia deuotos et humiles filios 
ex assuete pietatis officio propensius diligere consueuit, et, ne 
prauorum hominum molestiis agitantur, eos tanquam pia mater 
sua proteccionis munimine confouere. Ea propter, Dilecti in 
domino filij, uestris iustis postulacionibus grato concurrentes 
assensu, personas uestras et locum in quo diuino estis obsequio 
mancipati cum omnibus Bonis que in presenciarum raciona- 
biliter possidet aut in futurum, iustis modis, prestante domino, 
poterit adipisci, sub Beati Petri et nostra proteccione suscipi- 
mus. Specialiter autem, terras, possessiones, redditus et alia 
bona uestra, sicut ea omnia iuste ac pacifice possidetis, uobis 
et per uos monasterio vestro auctoritate apostolica confirma- 
mus, et presentis scripti patrocinio communimus. Nulli ergo 
omnino hominum liceat hanc paginam nostre proteccionis et 
confirmacionis infringere, uel ei ausu temerario contraire. Si 
[fol. 72 t ] quis | autem hoc attemptare presumpserit indignacionem omni- 
potentis dei et Beatorum Petri et Pauli apostolorum eius se 
nouerit incursurum. Datum Lugdun. ij Nonas Decembris, 
Pontificatus nostri anno Sexto. 

(Abstract) 
' GENERAL CONFIRMATION of INNOCENT iv.' 

INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, etc., to the abbot and convent of the monastery 
of Lundors. The Pope, concurring in their just requests, takes under 
the protection of Blessed Peter and himself the persons of the monks, 
and the place in which they are bound to the service of God, with all 
their possessions, etc. He confirms these possessions and protects them 
by the present writ. It is not lawful, etc. But if any, etc. ' Given at 
Lyons, ii. Nones of December [Dec. 4], in the sixth year of our ponti- 
ficate.' 1 



CII 
De Pensione de Wissindene. 

INNOCENCIVS Episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et conuentui monastery de Lundors, ordinis Sancti 
Benedicti, Sancti Andree diocesis, Salutem et apostolicam 
Benediccionem. Ex parte uestra fuit nobis humiliter suppli- 

1 A.D. 1248. Innocent iv. was elected on 24th June 1243. 



BULLS OF INNOCENT IV. 121 

catum ut cum uos annuam pensionem Decem marcarum per 
venerabilem fratrem nostrum episcopum Lincolniensem in 
ecclesia de Wissindene, Lincolniensis diocesis, in qua ius 
patronatus uos habere proponitis uobis concessam prout in 
ipsius episcopi litteris dicitur plenius contineri, Dilecto filio 
magistro Rolandino, Capellano nostro, rectori eiusdem ecclesie 
pro reuerencia nostra duxeritis personaliter remittendam, 
prouidere ne per huiusmodi remissionem uobis et monasterio 
uestro in posterum generetur preiudicium paterna sollicitudine 
curaremus. Nos igitur vestris supplicacionibus inclinati quod 
per predictam remissionem nullum uobis uel monasterio uestro 
super pensione prefata, cedente uel decedente memorato capel- 
lano, preiudicium generetur, Deuocioni uestre auctoritate 
presencium indulgemus. Nulli ergo omnino liceat hanc 
paginam nostre concessionis infringere uel ei ausu temerario 
contraire. Si quis, autem, hoc attemptare presumpserit, 
indignacionem omnipotentis dei et Beatorum Petri et Pauli 
apostolorum eius se nouerit incursurum. Datum Lugdun. viij 
Idus Decembris, Pontificatus nostri anno Sexto. 

(Abstract) 
' OF a PENSION from WISSINDENE.' 

INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, servant, etc., to the abbot and convent of the 
monastery of Lundors, etc. A humble supplication had been made by 
the monastery to the Pope that with fatherly care he would provide that 
no prejudice to the rights of the monastery should be created through 
the fact that out of reverence to the Pope they had thought fit to remit 
to Master Rolandin, the Pope's chaplain, then rector of the church of 
Wissindene, in the diocese of Lincoln, a pension often marks out of the 
church of Wissindene, which pension had been granted to them by the 
Bishop of Lincoln, as was more fully contained in the bishop's letters ; 
the right of patronage in the church of Wissindene being, as was stated 
by the monks, in their hands. The Pope, yielding to their supplications, 
grants that by reason of the aforesaid remission of the ten marks to 
llolandin no prejudice should be created to the monastery, on his 
resignation or death. It shall not be lawful to any man, etc. But if 
any presume, etc. 

Given at Lyons, viij. Ides of December [Dec. 6], in the sixth year of 
our pontificate. 1 

1 A.D. 1248. 



122 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

cm 

Contra inuasores et detentores bonorum. 

INNOCENCIVS Episcopus, seruus seruorum del, Dilectis filiis 
abbati et conuentui monastery de Lundors ordinis Sancti 
Benedict!, Sancti Andree diocesis, salutem et apostolicam Bene- 
diccionem. Ex parte uestra fuit propositum coram nobis, quod 
non [njulli clerici et laici asserentes contra uos aliquid questionis 
habere, aliquando monachos, interdum conuersos, et nonnum- 
quam animalia et alia bona monasterij uestri, pretextu cuiusdam 
praue consuetudinis, temeritate propria uadiare,inuadere, et tain 
diu detinere presumunt donee sit eis de huiusmodi questionibus 
iuxta ipsorum Beneplacitum satisfactum, quamquam in uos 
iurisdiccionem non habeant qua hoc possint, ordinariam seu 
eciam delegatam. Cum igitur iudicialis ordo ideo sit consti- 
tutus in medio ut nemo sibi audeat presumere ulcionem, et 
ob hoc id, tanquam nullo iure subnixum, non sit aliquatenus 
tollerandum, Nos uolentes quieti uestre consulere ac predic- 
torum maliciis obuiare, auctoritate presencium districcius 
inhibemus, ne quis^occasione predicte consuetudinis uobis 
memoratas inferre molestias ac bona predicti monasterij absque 
iure a occupare, uadiare, inuadere, seu quolibet modo detinere 
presumat. Nulli ergo omnino hominum liceat hanc paginam 
nostre inhibicionis infringere, uel ei ausu temerario contraire. 
Si quis autem hoc attemptare presumpserit, indignacionem 
omnipotentis dei et Beatorum Petri et Pauli apostolorum eius 
se noverit incursurum. Datum Lugdun. v. Kalendas Maij, 
Pontificatus nostri anno septimo. 

(Abstract} 
' AGAINST those who invade and detain PROPERTY [of the MONASTERY] ' 

INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, servant, etc., to the abbot and convent of the 
monastery of Lundors, etc. On your part it was alleged in our presence 
that some clerks and laymen, professing to have some question against 
you, boldly presume of their own motion, on the plea of a certain evil 
custom, to seize, hold in pledge, and detain sometimes monks, some- 
times converts, and sometimes animals and other goods of your monas- 
tery, until they consider themselves to have received satisfaction, although 
they have over you no jurisdiction either ordinary or even delegated, by 
reason of which they could do these things. Such action is in no wise 



BULLS OF INNOCENT IV. 123 

to be tolerated ; for the office of judge is exercised in a public tribunal, 
so that no man may venture to presume to avenge himself. The Pope, 
desirous to consult for the peace of the monastery, and to prevent the 
evil practices of the aforesaid persons, strictly forbids any one on the 
plea of the aforesaid custom to molest the monastery, or to seize, take 
in pledge, or detain in any way the goods of the monastery. It shall 
not be lawful, etc. But if any one shall presume, etc. Given at Lyons, 
v. Kalends of May [April 27], in the seventh year of our pontificate. 1 



CIV 
Conseruatorium de Londors. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
abbati de Dunfermelyn et priori de May, Sancti Andree diocesis, 
Salutem et apostolicam Benediccionem. Ex parte dilectorum 
filiorum abbatis et conuentus monasterij de Lundors, ordinis 
Sancti Benedict], Sancti Andree diocesis, fuit propositum coram 
nobis quod non [njulli clerici et laici asserentes contra eos aliquid 
questionis habere, aliquando monachos, interdum conuersos, et 
non nuncquam animalia et alia Bona dicti monasterij pretextu 
cuiusdam praue consuetudinis | temeritate propria uadiare, \J l - 
inuadere et tarn diu detinere presumat donee sit eis de huius- 
modi questionibus iuxta ipsorum beneplacitum satisfactum ; 
quamquam in eos non habeant qua hoc possint iurisdiccionem 
ordinariam uel eciam delegatam. Cum itaque iudicialis ordo 
ideo sit constitutus in medio ut nemo sibi audeat presumere 
ulcionem, et ob hoc id, tanquam nullo iure subnixum, non sit 
aliquatenus tollerandum, Nos uolentes quieti ipsorum consulere, 
ac predictorum maliciis obuiare, auctoritate apostolica duximus 
districcius inhibendum, ne quis occasione predicte consuetu- 
dinis eis memoratas inferre molestias, ac bona predicti monas- 
terij absque iuris ordine occupare sen quolibet modo detinere 
presumat. Quocirca discrecioni uestre per apostolica scripta 
mandamus, quatinus ipsos non permittatis, contra inhibicionis 
nostre tenorem, super hiis ab aliquibus indebite molestari, 
Molestatores huiusmodi per censuram ecclesiasticam appella- 
cione postposita, compescendo. Datum Lugdun. v. kalend. 
Maij, Pontificatus nostri anno septimo. 

1 A.D. I25O. 



124 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

(Abstract) 
' WRIT of PROTECTION (conservatorium) of LUNDORS.' 

INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, servant, etc., to the Abbot of Dunfermline and 
the Prior of May, in the diocese of St. Andrews, etc. The account of 
the seizure and holding in pledge of monks, converts, animals, and other 
goods of the monastery is recited as in cm. After which follows : 
' Wherefore we commit to your discretion by apostolic writ that ye do 
not permit them to be improperly molested by any contrary to the 
tenor of our inhibition, restraining offenders of this kind by the censure 
of the Church, appeal being postponed. Given at Lyons, v. Kal. of May 
[April 27], in the seventh year of our pontificate. l 



cv 

De episcopis Abirdonensis ecclesie qui 
molestauerunt locum nostrum. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum del, Dilectis filiis, 
Cancellario Morauiensi, Thesaurario, et magistro Johanni de 
Euerley Canonico Dunkeldensi, Salutem et apostolicam Bene- 
diccionem. Presentata nobis Dilectorum filiorum de Kelchou, 
de Aberbrodoch, et de Lundors, abbatum, sancti andree diocesis, 
sancti Benedict!, ac prioris cathedralis ecclesie sancti Andree, 
sancti Augustini ordinum, conuentuumque suorum peticio, 
continebat quod cum bone memorie aberdonenses Episcopi, 
capituli sui accedente consensu, quasdam ecclesias aberdonensis 
diocesis in quibus abbates, prior, et conuentus iidem ins obtinent 
patronatus, in proprios usus eorum sibi duxerint concedendas, 
et quod per eosdem episcopos taliter factum extitit in hac 
parte per apostolicam sedem fuerit postmodum confirmatum ; 
Venerabilis frater noster Aberdonensis Episcopus, episcoporum 
illorum successor, vicariis ecclesiarum ipsarum sub pena 
suspensionis pro sua inhibuit uoluntate ne ultra pensiones 
antiquas de dictis ecclesiis aliquid de cetero soluerent abbati- 
bus, priori, et conuentibus memoratis. Quocirca discrecioni 
vestre per apostolica scripta mandamus quatinus eorumdem 
abbatum, prioris, et conuentuum instruments diligenter inspec- 
tis, si dictas ecclesias inueneritis non esse sibi pensionarias, 

1 A.D. I25O. 



BULLS OF INNOCENT IV. 125 

set in proprios usus canonice deputatas, inhibicionem episcopi 
prelibati, auctoritate nostra, reuocare curetis. Nee ullatenus 
permittatis abbates, priorem, et conuentus eosdem super hiis 
ulterius ab aliquibus indebite molestari ; Molestatores huius- 
modi per censuram ecclesiasticam, sublato appellacionis obsta- 
culo, compescendo : Non obstantibus aliquibus litteris ueritati 
et iusticie prejudicantibus, per quas execucio mandati presentis 
impediri ualeat uel differri, et de quibus specialem oporteat in 
presentibus fieri mencionem. Quod si non omnes hiis exe- 
quendis potueritis interesse, duo vestrum ea nichilominus 
exequantur. Datum Lugdun. xij. Kalendas Maij, Pontificatus 
nostri anno Septimo. 

(Abstract) 

1 OF BISHOPS of the CHURCH of ABERDEEN who have molested 
our place.' 

INNOCENT [iv. ], bishop, servant, etc. , to the Chancellor of Moray, the 
Treasurer, and Master John of Everley, Canon of Dunkeld, etc. A 
petition presented to the Pope by the abbots of Kelchou, Aberbrothoc, and 
Lundors, in the diocese of St. Andrews, of the order of St. Benedict, 
and the prior of the cathedral church of St. Andrews, of the order of St. 
Augustine, and their convents, contained that Bishops of Aberdeen, of 
good memory, with the consent of their chapters, had thought fit to 
grant to them for their own uses (in proprios usus) certain churches in 
the diocese of Aberdeen, in which their abbots, the prior, and convents 
have the right of patronage ; and what was done in this respect by the 
bishops was presently confirmed by the Apostolic See. Further, the 
petition went on to state that the Bishop of Aberdeen, successor of those 
bishops, had of his own will inhibited, under pain of suspension, the 
vicars of those churches from paying anything in future to the abbots, 
prior, and convents aforesaid, beyond the old pensions from those 
churches. Wherefore it is committed to the Chancellor of Moray, the 
Treasurer, and John of Everley, canon of Dunkeld, that they should care- 
fully examine the documentary evidence (instrumentis) on the matter ; 
and if they found that the said churches were not pensionary [that is, 
liable for payment of a fixed pension], but had been made over to the 
abbots, prior, and convents for their own uses, they were to revoke, 
by the Pope's authority, the inhibition of the Bishop of Aberdeen. They 
were further to prevent the abbots, prior, and convents being molested, 
by restraining those who molest them by the censure of the Church, 
appeal being disallowed (sublato appellationis obstaculo), and this, notwith- 
standing any letters prejudicial to truth and justice by which the execu- 
tion of the present mandate could be impeded or delayed, and of which 
letters special mention ought to be made in these presents. But if all 



126 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

of you cannot take part in the execution of these things, nevertheless 
let two of you execute them. Given at Lyons, xij. of the Kalends of 
May [April 20], in the seventh year of our pontificate. 1 



CVI 
Item de eisdem episcopis Abirdonensibus. 

INNOCENCIVS episcopus, seruus seruorum dei, Dilectis filiis 
Cancellario Morauiensi, Thesaurario, et magistro Johanni de 
Euerley, canonico Dunkeldensi, salutem et apostolicam Bene- 
diccionem. Presentata nobis Dilectorum filiorum de Kelchou, 
de Aberbrodoch, et de Lundors, Abbatum, Sancti Andree 
diocesis, Sancti Benedict!, ac prioris cathedralis ecclesie Sancti 
Andree, Sancti Augustini ordinum, Conuentuumque suorum 
peticio continebat quod cum bone memorie Aberdonenses 
[fol. 74.] Episcopi, Capituli sui acce|dente consensu, quasdam ecclesias 
Aberdonensis diocesis in quibus Abbates, prior, et conuentus 
iidem ius obtinent patronatus in proprios usus eorum sibi 
duxerint concedendas, et quod per eosdem episcopos taliter 
factum extitit in hac parte per apostolicam sedem fuerit post- 
modum confirmatum, Venerabilis frater noster Aberdonensis 
Episcopus, episcoporum illorum successor, pro sua nobis sug- 
gerens uoluntate, quod nonnulli abbates, priores, aliique 
prelati, tarn religiosi quam eciam seculares, in ciuitate Aber- 
donensi et Diocesi constituti vicariis quarundam ecclesiarum 
quas in proprios usus tenent imponentes nouas contra Latera- 
nensis statuta concilij pensiones, terras et alias possessiones, ad 
uicarias spectantes easdem, ipsis subtrahunt vicariis, eas in usus 
proprios conuertendo; Quidam uero prelatorum ipsorum tantum 
de prouentibus ecclesiarum percipiunt predictarum quod earum 
vicarij nequeunt de residue comode sustentari, a nobis obtinuit 
[litteras] continentes ut super hiis auctoritate nostra statueret 
prout utilitati ecclesiarum ipsarum secundum deum expedire 
uideret, non obstantibus concessionibus quibuscunque et 
confirmacionibus eciam a sede apostolica impetratis, Contra- 
dictores per censuram ecclesiasticam, apellacione postposita, 
compescendo. Cumque litterarum ipsarum pretextu niteretur 

1 A.D. 1250. 



BULLS OF INNOCENT IV. 

idem episcopus ordinare, fines tenoris earum perperam exce- 
dendo, quod prefati abbates, prior, a et conuentus de pro- a MS> p rior 
uentibus dictarum ecclesiarum certain annuatim reciperent ^onue^itus 
porcionem, et omnes reliqui prouentus ipsarum assignarentur 
vicariis earundem, Jam dicti abbates, prior, et conuentus se ac 
ecclesias suas sen monasteria sua per ordinacionem huiusmodi 
sencientes indebite aggrauari, per apellacionis remedium 
nostram audienciam inuocarunt, cui dictus episcopus detulit 
reuerenter sicut in eius litteris perspeximus contineri. Quo- 
circa discrecioni uestre per apostolica scripta mandamus, 
quatinus facultatibus ipsarum ecclesiarum diligenter solicite- 
que pensatis in eis prout discrecio uestra secundum deum 
uideret expedire, certas et determinatas curetis statuere ui- 
carias, et de prouentibus ecclesiarum illarum porcionem ipsis 
congruam assignantes, nominatos abbates, priorem, et con- 
uentus postea contra ordinacionem vestram super hiis nulla- 
tenus permittatis ab aliquibus indebite molestari, molestatores 
huiusmodi per censurarn ecclesiasticam, sublato appellacionis 
obstaculo, compescendo ; Non obstantibus aliquibus litteris 
ueritati et iusticie preiudicantibus, per quas execucio mandati 
presentis impediri ualeat uel differri, et de quibus specialem 
oporteat in presentibus fieri mencionem. Quod si non omnes 
hiis exequendis potueritis interesse, duo uestrum ea nichilo- 
minus exequantur. Datum Lugdun. xij. Kalend. Maij, Ponti- 
ficatus nostri anno Septimo. 

(Abstract) 
' Concerning the same BISHOPS of ABERDEEN.' 

INNOCENT [iv.], bishop, servant, etc., to the Chancellor of Moray, the 
Treasurer, and Master John of Everley, Canon of Dunkeld, etc. The 
narrative is recited as in the preceding 1 writ (cv.) as far as the words ' con- 
firmed by the Apostolic See/ After which it proceeds as follows . ' Our 
venerable brother, the Bishop of Aberdeen, the successor of those bishops, 
of his own accord intimated to us that some abbots, priors, and other 
prelates, as well religious as secular, in the city and diocese of Aberdeen, 
impose upon the vicars of certain churches which they hold for their 
own uses (in proprios usus) new pensions, contrary to the statutes of the 
Lateran Council, and withdraw from the vicars lands and other posses- 
sions pertaining to the vicarages, and convert them to their own uses, 
adding that some of these prelates receive so much from the revenues of 



128 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

the said churches that the vicars cannot be properly maintained out of 
the residue. The Bishop of Aberdeen obtained from us letters to the 
effect that he might by our authority make enactments on these matters, 
as might, in the sight of God, seem to him expedient, for the advantage 
of those churches, notwithstanding all concessions and confirmations 
whatsoever which had been obtained from the Apostolic See, restraining 
opponents by the censure of the Church, appeal being postponed. And 
since, under pretence of these letters, the limits of the tenor of which he 
has much exceeded, the bishop endeavours to ordain that the aforesaid 
abbots, prior, and convents should receive yearly a fixed portion from 
the revenues of the said churches, all the remaining revenues of the 
same being assigned to the vicars of the same, the aforesaid abbots, 
prior, and convents, feeling themselves and their churches, or monas- 
teries, to be aggrieved, have appealed for remedy to our judgment, to 
which the aforesaid bishop reverently submitted himself, as appears 
from his letters. \Vherefore we commit to your discretion by our 
apostolic writ to weigh diligently arid carefully the capabilities (facultati- 
bus) of these churches, as may seem expedient to your discretion in the 
sight of God, and then to fix and determine the values of the vicarages 
[i.e. the benefices], and to assign a fitting portion to the vicars of the 
same, and after that to prevent the abbots, prior, and convents suffering 
molestation in this matter, restraining those who would molest them 
by the censure of the Church, appeal being disallowed. And this, not- 
withstanding any letters prejudicial to truth and justice, by which the 
execution of this mandate could be hindered or delayed, and of which 
letters special mention should be made in these presents. Which, if not 
all of you, etc. Given at Lyons, xij. Kalends of May [April 20], in 
the seventh year of our pontificate. 1 

CVII 
De confirmacione Ecclesie de Lundoris. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus, Rogerus 
del gracia Episcopus Sancti Andree, perpetuam in Domino 
Salutem. Nouerint omnes, tarn posteri quam presentes, Do- 
minum Dauid comitem, fratrem domini Willelmi Regis 
Scotorum, fundasse abbaciam quandam de ordine Kelkoensi 
apud Lundors, pro salute Domini Willelmi Regis fratris sui, 
et pro salute anime sue et matildis comitisse coniugis sue, et 
omnium heredum ipsorum, et pro salute anime Regis Dauid 
aui sui, et Comitis Henrici patris sui, et Ade Comitisse matris 
sue, et omnium antecessorum suorum, et ipsam ecclesiam de 

1 A.D. 1250, 



CONFIRMATION BY BISHOP ROGER 129 

Lundors cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis abbati et mona- 
chis ibidem Deo seruientibus in liberam et puram et perpetuam 
elemosinam concessisse. Nos igitur diuini amoris intuitu, ad 
peticionem domini Dauid comitis iam dicti, auctoritate nostra, 
damus et concedimus et hac carta nostra confirmamus abbati 
et monachis ibidem Deo serui | entibus ipsam ecclesiam de [f l - ? 5 '] 
Lundors et personatum eiusdem ecclesie cum omnibus iustis 
pertinenciis suis ad sedem abbacie, in liberam et puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam ad proprios usus et sustentationes 
eorundem monachorum, vt iam dicta ecclesia de Lundors 
libera sit et quieta a conrediis et hospiciis, et sinodalibus, et Nota Digni- 
can, et conueth ; concedimus eciam et confirmamus eis digni- ta 
tatem pacis et omnes alias libertates quas abbacia habere debet, 
ita libere, quiete, plenarie et honorifice, sicut aliqua abbacia in 
regno Scocie liberius, quiecius, plenius, et honorificiencius tenet 
et possidet. Hiis Testibus, Domino Rege Willelmo, Comite 
Dauid fratre eius, Johanne Episcopo Aberdonensi, Ricardo 
Episcopo Morauiensi, Reginaldo Episcopo Rossensi, Jonatha 
episcopo Dunblanensi, Johanne episcopo Dunkeldensi, Radul- 
pho episcopo Brechinensi, O. abbate de Kalkov, Henrico 
abbate de Abirbrothoc, Ranulfo archidiacono, Johanne 
archidiacono Laodonie, A. Comite de Fyfe, M. filio eius, 
Willelmo de Lyndeseya, A. A. filio eius, Philippe de Valo- 
niis, Dauid de Haya, Walkelino filio Stephani, Malcolmo filio 
Bertulphi, Roberto Basset, Wilelmo de Wiuile, Malcolmo de 
Keth, Wilellmo de Svvatham, cum multis aliis. 

(4b*tract) 
' OF the CONFIRMATION of the CHURCH of LUNDORS.' 

ROGER, by the grace of God, Bishop of St. Andrews, to all the sons of 
Holy Mother Church, etc. Let all, as well those to come as those 
present, know that the Lord David, earl, brother of the Lord William, 
King of Scots, founded an abbey at Lundors of the order of Kelko, for 
the weal of the king his brother, and for the weal of his own soul and of 
the soul of the Countess Matilda, his wife, and of all his heirs, and for 
the weal of the soul of King David, his grandfather, and of Earl Henry, 
his father, and of Countess Ada, his mother, and of all his ancestors, arid 
granted the church of Lundors itself, with all its just pertinents, to the 
abbot and the monks there serving God, in free, pure, and perpetual 
alms. We, therefore, prompted by divine love, at the request of the 
Lord, Earl David, already mentioned, by our authority give, grant, and 

I 



130 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

by this present charter confirm, to the abbot and monks there serving 
God, the church itself of Lundors and the rights of rector (personatum), 
with all its just pertinents at the seat of the abbey, in free, pure, and 
perpetual alms, for their own uses and the maintenance of the same monks, 
so that the aforesaid church of Lundors may be free and exempt from 
corrodies and claims for entertainment (hospiciis), and synodals, and 
cane, and conveth. We grant and confirm to them also the dignity of 
the peace, and all other liberties which an abbey ought to have, as 
freely, etc. Witnesses, . . . 



CVIII 
Item de eadem ecclesia. 

VNIVERSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus Willelmus 
del gracia episcopus Sancti Andree, perpetuam in domino Salu- 
tem. Nouerint omnes tarn poster! quam presentes dominum 
Dauid comitem, fratrem domini Willelmi Regis Scottorum, 
fundasse abbaciam quandam de ordine Kelkoensi apud 
Lundors, pro salute domini Regis Willelmi fratris sui, et pro 
salute anime sue et matildis comitisse coniugis sue, et omnium 
heredum ipsorum, et pro salute anime Dauid regis aui sui, et 
comitis Henrici patris sui, et Ade Comitisse matris sue, et 
omnium antecessorum suorum, et ipsam ecclesiam de Lundors 
cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis abbati et monachis ibidem 
deo seruientibus in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam 
concessisse. Nos igitur diuini amoris intuitu, auctoritate 
nostra, concedimus et hac carta nostra confirmamus abbati et 
monachis ibidem deo seruientibus ipsam ecclesiam de Lundors 
et personatum eiusdem ecclesie, cum omnibus iustis perti- 
nenciis suis, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ad 
proprios usus et sustentaciones eorundem monachorum, vt 
iam dicta ecclesia parochialis de Lundors libera sit et quieta a 
conrediis et hospiciis et synodalibus. Concedimus eciam et 
confirmamus eis dignitatem pacis et omnes alias libertates qtias 
abbacia habere debet, Ita libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice, 
sicut aliqua abbacia in regno Scocie liberius, quiecius, plenius, 
et honorificencius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, Domino 
Thoma priore de Sancto Andrea, Magistro Ranulfo archi- 
diacono Sancti Andree, Magistro Johanne archidiacono Lao- 
dome, Magistris Andrea de Morauia, Michaele, Stephano, 



CONFIRMATIONS BY BPS. WILLIAM AND DAVID 131 

Petro Baillard, Johanne de Haut thuysille, Radulpho nigro, 
clericis nostris, Magistro Symone Sancti Andree, Stephano de 
Perth, Magistro Ysaac, Willelmo Decano de Carel, et multis 

aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' Of the same CHURCH.' 

To all the sons of Holy Mother Church, etc. William, by the grace of 
God, Bishop of St. Andrews, etc. 

The language of the preceding charter [cvn.] is repeated with the 
following alterations : the bishop's confirmation is not said to be at the 
request of Earl David ; the church of Lundors is spoken of as ' the parish 
church of Lundors' ; and the exemption from ( cane and conveth* is 
omitted. Witnesses . . . 

CIX 

De Eadem Ecclesia. 

DAVID, permissione Diuina Ecclesie Sancti Andree minister 
humilis, omnibus christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel 
audit uris, eternam in Domino salutem. Nouerint, tarn poster! 
quam presentes, Dominum Dauid Co mitem, fratrem Domini {fai. 76.} 
Willelmi Regis Scotorum, fundasse abbaciam quamdam de 
ordine Kelkoensi apud Lundors, pro salute domini Regis W. 
fratris sui, et pro salute anime sue, et Matildis Comitisse 
coniugis sue, et omnium heredum ipsorum, et pro salute 
anime Regis Dauid aui sui, et comitis Henrici patris sui, et 
Ade Comitisse matris sue, et omnium antecessorum suorum, 
Et ipsam ecclesiam de Lundors, a cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis * MS. Et ipsam 
suis, abbati et monachis ibidem Deo seruientibus in liberam, et Lundors et e 
puram et perpetuam elemosinam,concessisse. Nos igitur diuini ip^m ecclesiam 
amoris intuitu, auctoritate nostra, damns et concedimus et hac 
carta nostra confirmamus abbati et monachis ibidem deo 
seruientibus, ipsam ecclesiam de Lundors et personatum 
eiusdem ecclesie cum omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis ad Sedem 
abbacie, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ad 
proprios usus et sustentaciones eorundem monachorum vt iam 
dicta ecclesia de Lundors libera sit et quieta a conrediis, et 
hospiciis, et Synodalibus, et Can, et Conueth. Concedimus 
eciam et confirmamus eis Dignitatem pacis, et omnes alias 
libertates quas abbacia liabere debet, ita libere, quiete, plenarie, 



132 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

* MS. rengno. et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia in regno a Scocie liberius, 
quiecius, plenius, et honor! ficenci us tenet et possidet. Hiis 
testibus, et cetera. 

(Abstract) 

( OF the same CHURCH.' 

DAVID, by divine permission, humble minister of the church of St. 
Andrews to all the faithful of Christ, etc. 

The language of the preceding charter [cvni.] is repeated, but ' cane 
and conveth ' appear again, as in the charter of Bishop Roger [cvu.]. 

cx 

Item de eadem ecclesia. 

GAMELiNvs,miseracione diuina ecclesie Sancti Andree Minister 
humilis, omnibus christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel 
audituris, eternam in domino Salutem. Nouerint tarn pre- 
sentes quam futuri dominum Dauid comitem, fratrem domini 
Willelmi Regis Scotorum, fundasse abbaciam quamdam de 
ordine Kelkoensi apud Lundors, pro salute anime sue, et 
Matildis coniugis sue, et omnium heredum ipsorum, et pro 
salute animarum omnium antecessorum et successorum 
suorum, et parochialem ecclesiam de Lundors, cum omnibus 
iustis pertinenciis suis, abbati et monachis ibidem deo 
seruientibus, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
concessisse. Nos igitur diuini amoris intuitu, auctoritate 
nostra, damus et concedimus et hac carta nostra confirmamus 
abbati et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus, ipsam parochialem 
ecclesiam de Lundors et personatum eiusdem ecclesie, cum 
omnibus iustis pertinenciis suis, ad sedem abbacie, in liberam 
et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, ad proprios usus et sus- 
tentaciones eorundem monachorum, vt iam dicta ecclesia de 
Lundors sit libera et quieta a conrediis, et hospiciis, et Syno- 
dalibus, et Can, et Conueth. Concedimus eciam et confirmamus 
eis dignitatem pacis, et omnes alias libertates quas abbacia 
habere debet, Ita libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice, sicut 
b MS. rengno. aliqua abbacia in regno b Scocie liberius, quiecius, plenius, et 
honorificencius tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, domino G. 
priore de Sancto Andrea, Magistro Ada de Malcaruiston 
officiario nostro, Magistris Thoma de Carnoto et G. de Heriz, 



CONFIRMATION BY BISHOP GAMELIN 133 

domino Johanne Capellano nostro, Johanne de Cuninghame 
et aliis. Datum apud Lundors, sabbato proximo ante Natale 
domini, Anno gracie M. Ducentesimo quinquagesimo nono. 

(Abstract) 
' OF the same CHURCH.' 

GAMELIN, by divine mercy, humble minister of the church of St. 
Andrews, to all the faithful of Christ, etc. 

The language of the preceding charter [cix.] is repeated. Witnesses 
. . . Given at Lundors on Saturday next before Christmas, in the year 
of grace MCCLIX. 

CXI 

C De bosco capiendo in Glenlithere in Stratherne. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presens scriptum uisuris uel audituris 
Robertas dictus frater senescalli de Stratherne, eternam in do- 
mino Salutem. Nouerit uniuersitas uestra quod cum auctoritate 
apostolica mota esset causa coram archidiacono Dunkeldensi et 
commissariis suis, videlicet priore et sacrista de Abirbrothoc, 
inter viros religiosos abbatem et conuentum de Lundores 
actores, ex vna parte, et me reum ex altera ; Ac ex parte 
dictorum abbatis et conuentus mihi esset | editum sub hac U l - 
forma, Dicunt abbas et conuentus de Lundores contra Robertum 
fratrem senescalli de Stratherne quod cum ipsi et homines 
eorum essent in pacifica possessione capiendi materiem in 
Bosco de Glenlicherne in Stratherne ad edificia sustinenda et 
reparanda in terra sua de fedal que est in Kater mothel, et 
similiter ea que pertinent ad agriculturam, dictus Robertus 
prefatos abbatem et Conuentum prefata sua pacifica posses- 
sione contra iusticiam spoliauit. Quare dicti abbas et conuentus 
petunt ad possessionem suam pristinam restitui, et predictum 
Robertum ad possessionem eandem eisdem abbati et conuentui 
plenarie faciendam per censuram ecclesiasticam compelli. 
Hec dicunt et petunt, saluo sibi iuris beneficio in omnibus, 
protestantes se uelle petere expensas in lite factas et de cetero 
faciendas. Tandem ego Robertus pro mea contumacia per 
dictos commissaries ab ingressu ecclesie, auctoritate apostolica, 
suspensus, ac postmodum, multiplicata contumacia, excommuni- 
catus, lesamque in hac parte habens conscienciam liti cedere 



134 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

pocius quam contendere existimavi. Vnde prestito super hoc 
corporal! iuramento pro me et meis omnibus et singulis, fideliter 
promisi quod prefatos abbatem et conuentum ac homines 
eorundem prefata possessione sua capiendi materiem in pre- 
dicto bosco libere gaudere permittam. Nee eos uel successores 
suos uel homines eorum aliquatenus super premissis in posterum 
uexabo,inquietabo,perturbabo,nec perturbacionem aliquam per 
me uel per alios procurabo. Ita tamen quod homines dictorum 
abbatis et conuentus, vnus uel plures, quandocunque uoluerint 
MS. cedere. caedere a in dicto bosco, me uel seruientem meum tantummodo 
premunient. Volo eciarn et concede, si ego, contra prefatam 
litis cessionem, prestiti iuramenti obseruacionem et promis- 
sionem contrauenire presumpsero, uel aliquis meorum contra 
premissa attemptare presumpserit, quod archidiaconus Sancti 
Andree uel eius Officialis, qui pro tempore fuerint, quorum 
iurisdiccioni me et meos subieci sub alternacione in hac parte, 
ex tune me et meos omnes et singulos ad omnia premissa et 
singula firmiter obseruanda, terna tantum monicione premissa, 
absque omni strepitu iudiciali per suspensionis, excommunica- 
cionis, et interdict! sentencias in personam meam et meorum 
libere ualeat compellere. In cuius rei testimonium present! 
scripto sigillum meum apposui et sigillis dictorum Commissari- 
orum, vna cum sigillo diet! Archidiaconi, Judicis principalis, 
apponi procuravi. Datum apud Lundors in Crastino purifica- 
cionis beate virginis, Anno gracie millesimo ducentesimo L 
sexto. 

(Abstract) 

( OF TAKING WOOD ill GLENLITHERE in STRATHERNE.' 

To all the faithful of Christ, etc. ' Robert, called the brother of Steward 
(senescalli) of Stratherne,' etc. Inasmuch as a suit has been carried on 
before the Archdeacon of Dunkeld and his commissaries, to wit, the 
Prior and the Sacrist of Aberbrothoc, acting under apostolic authority, 
between the religious, the Abbot and Convent of Lundors, pursuers 
(adores), of the one part, and me, defender (reum), of the other part ; 
and on the part of the said abbot and convent, an indictment was served 
on me in the following terms, ' The Abbot and Convent of Lundors affirm 
against Robert, brother of Stewart of Stratherne, that while they and 
their men enjoyed peaceable possession of [the right of] taking timber 
from the wood of Glenlitherne in Stratherne for maintaining and repair- 
ing their buildings on their land of Fedal, which is in Kater Mothel, 
and likewise for the purposes of agriculture, the said Robert in violation 



ADMISSION OF A CLAIM TO TIMBER 135 

of justice deprived the aforesaid abbot and convent of the aforesaid 
peaceable possession. Wherefore the said abbot and convent seek to 
be restored to their former possession, and crave that the said Robert 
should be compelled by the censure of the Church to give full possession 
of the same to the same abbot and convent. These things they affirm 
and seek, reserving their right to all benefit of the law, and publicly 
declaring that they desire to seek the costs incurred, or hereafter to be 
incurred, in litigation.' At length I, Robert, having been suspended, 
for my contumacy, from entering the church, by the said commissaries 
acting on apostolic authority, and afterwards having been excommunicated 
for repeated contumacy, and having as regards this matter a troubled 
conscience, have thought it better to withdraw from the suit than to 
carry on the contention. Accordingly I have taken my corporal oath 
and faithfully promised for me and mine, all and singular, that I will 
permit the aforesaid abbot and convent and their men to freely enjoy 
their aforesaid possession of taking timber in the aforesaid wood. Nor 
will I in future vex, annoy, or disturb them or their successors or their 
men in respect to the aforesaid, nor will I procure that they should be 
in any way disturbed by myself or by others. Provided that whenever the 
men of the said abbot and convent, one or more, shall desire to cut 
[timber] in the said wood they shall give previous notice to me or my 
officer (servientem). If I, contrary to my withdrawal from this suit, 
shall presume to contravene my promise and the observance of my oath 
which I have taken, or if any of mine shall presume to attempt anything 
contrary to the premisses, I consent and allow that the Archdeacon of 
St. Andrews, or his official, for the time being, to whose jurisdiction, 
whether of the one or the other, I subject me and mine, may thereupon 
freely compel me and mine, all and singular, to strictly observe the 
premisses, all and singular, after three monitions only and without any 
judicial proceedings, by sentences of suspension, excommunication, and 
interdict against the persons of me and mine. In testimony of which 
thing I have affixed my seal to the present writ, and procured the seals 
of the said commissaries, together with the seal of the archdeacon, judge 
principal, to be affixed. 

Given at Lundors, on the morrow of the Purification of the Blessed 
Virgin [Feb. 2], in the year of grace MCCLVI. 



CXII 

Joachim de Kynbuc super bosco capiendo 
in Curelundyn. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris 
Joachim de Kynbuc, miles, eternam in domino salutem. 
Nouerit uniuersitas vestra quod cum auctoritate apostolica 



136 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

mota esset causa coram archidiacono Dunkeldensi inter uiros 
religiosos abbatem et conuentum de Lundors actores ex vna 
parte, et me reum ex altera, ac ex parte dictorum abbatis et 
conuentus mihi esset editum sub hac forma, Dicunt abbas et 
conuentus de Lundors contra dictum Joachym de Kynbuc 
militem, quod cum ipsi et homines eorum essent in pacifica 
possessione capiendi materiem in bosco de Curelundyn in 
Stratherne ad edificia sustinenda et reparanda in terra sua de 
fedale que est in Gather Mothyl, et similiter ea que pertinent 
ad agriculturam, dictus Joachim prefatos abbatem et conuen- 
tum prefata sua pacifica possessione contra iusticiam spoliauit. 
Quare dictus Abbas et conuentus petunt ad possessionem suam 
pristinam restitui, et predictum Joachim ad possessionem 
eandem eisdem abbati et conuentui faciendam plenarie per 
censuram ecclesiasticam compelli. Hec dicunt et petunt, saluo 
sibi iuris beneficio in omnibus, Protestantes se uelle petere 
expensas in lite factas et de cetero faciendas. Tandem ego 
Joachim pro contumacia a dicto archiadiacono ab ingressu 
ecclesie auctoritate apostolica suspensus, lesamque in hac parte 
habens conscienciam liti pocius cedere quam contendere 
existimaui. Vnde prestito super hoc corporali iuramento pro 
me et successoribus meis omnibus et singulis fideliter promissi 
quod prefatos abbatem et conuentum prefata possessione 
sua capiendi materiem in predicto bosco libere gaudere per- 
mittam. Nee eos uel successores suos uel homines eorum 
[/&/. 78.] aliquatenus super premissis in posterum vexabo, inquietabo, 
perturbabo, nee perturbacionem aliquam per me uel per alios 
procurabo. Volo eciam et concede, si ego contra prefatam 
litis cessionem, prestiti iuramenti obseruacionem et promis- 
sionem contrauenire presumpsero, uel aliquis successorum 
meorum contra premissa attemptare presumpserit, quod ex 
tune ad omnia premissa et singula fideliter in perpetuum 
obseruanda, me et successores meos omnes et singulos obli- 
gando jurisdiccioni archidiaconi Sancti Andree qui pro tempore 
fuerit subieci. Videlicet ut dictus archidiaconus me et succes- 
sores meos omnes et singulos ad omnia premissa et singula, 
trina tantum monicione premissa, absque omni strepitu 
judiciali per suspensionis, excommunicacionis, et interdicti 
sentencias in personam meam et successorum meorum libere 



ADMISSION OF A CLAIM TO TIMBER 137 

ualeat compellere. In cuius rei testimonium present! scripto 
sigillum meum apposui Et sigillum dicti archidiaconi Dun- 
keldensis apponi procuraui. Datum in crastino sancti Vin- 
cencii anni gracie m 1 cc* L vj 1 . 

(Abstract) 
' JOACHIM of KYNBUC upon taking WOOD in CURELUNDYN.' 

To all the faithful of Christ, etc., Joachim of Kynbuc, knight, etc. 
The writ recites in language similar to that of cxi., that litigation had 
heen raised before the Archdeacon of Dunkeld, acting under ' apostolic 
authority,' between the abbot and convent of Lundors, pursuers, and 
Joachim of Kynbuc, defender. The indictment on behalf of the abbot 
and convent is precisely in the same form, mutatis mutandis, as in the 
preceding writ. The wood of Curelundyn is said to be in Stratherne. 
Joachim subjects himself and his successors to the jurisdiction of the 
Archdeacon of St. Andrews (whose official is not mentioned, as in the 
preceding writ). The promise of Joachim is made on behalf of himself 
and his successors. ' In testimony of which thing I have affixed my 
seal to the present writ and procured the seal of the Archdeacon of 
Dunkeld to be affixed. Given on the morrow of St. Vincent [Jan. 22] 
of the year of grace MCCLXI.' 

CXIII 

Carta domini Robert! de Campaniis. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus presens scriptum visuris vel audi- 
turis Robertus de Campaniis, Salutem in domino sempiternam. 
Noverit uriiversitas vestra quod cum auctoritate domini pape 
coram judicibus delegatis esset mota controversia inter 
religiosos viros, abbatem et conventum de Lundors, ex parte 
una, et me ex altera, super quodam annuo redditu trium mar- 
carum eisdem abbati et conventui per dominum Willielmum 
de Campaniis, cui ego jure hereditario succedo, in puram et 
perpetuam elimosinam pro se et heredibus suis collatarum, et 
in terra sua de Stokes in Comitatu Leycestre assignatarum, 
sicut plenius continebatur in carta dicti domini Willelmi super 
hoc confecta ex certa consciencia sua sigillo suo signata, cujus 
tenor talis erat. Omnibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Willelmus de Campaniis, Salutem. Noverit universitas vestra 
me dedisse, concessisse, et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse 
deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti Andree de Lundors et 



138 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

monachis ibidem Deo servientibus et servituris, pro salute 
anime patris mei Roberti de Campaniis qui ibidem sepultus 
est, et pro animabus omnium antecessorum et successorum 
meorum, in puram et perpetuam elimosinam, tres marcas argenti 
annuatim percipiendas de me et heredibus meis ad Penthecosten, 
in terra mea de Stokes in Comitatu Leycestre. Predicti vero 
monachi ad peticionem meam caritative concesserunt quod 
singulis diebus in perpetuum ad altare Sancti Nicholai cantetur 
aliqua missa in eadem ecclesia in qua fiet commemoracio specialis 
pro anima patris mei et pro animabus omnium fidelium 
defunctorum ; ut autem hec mea donacio rata sit et stabilis in 
perpetuum, presenti scripto sigillum meum apposui. Testibus, 
domino J. Comite Cestre et Huntendun, domino Henrico de 
Strivelin, domino Radulpho de Campaniis, domino Galfrido de 
Appelby, domino Theobaldo de Bellus, domino Hugone Fitun, 
domino Radulpho de Sayer, domino Anketino, domino Peleryn, 
Hugone clerico, Petro clerico, Nicholao de Innerpeffyr, et 
multis aliis. Tandem ego Robertus in judicio constitutus, 
inspecto tenore predicte carte non cancellate, non abolite, 
nee in aliqua parte sui viciate, confessus sum me et heredes 
meos teneri in perpetuum singulis annis predictis abbati et 
conventui in tribus marcis sterlingorum solvendis annuatim in 
festo Penthecostes juxta tenorem predicte carte, ac post 
hujusmodi confessionem in judicio factam, mediantibus eisdem 
judicibus delegatis et aliis viris fidedignis, predicta contro- 
versia conquievit sub hac forma, videlicet quod predicti abbas 
et conventus ad peticionem meam remiserunt michi omnia 
arreragia, dampna, et expensas, que vel quas petebant a me in 
judicio, occasione dictarum trium marcarum detentarum a 
tempore obitus dicti domini W. de Campaniis usque in diem 
veneris proximam post festum Sancti Mathie apostoli, Anno 
gracie m. cc. L. nono, et preterea assignacioni eisdem abbati 
et conventui facte in terra de Stokes de predictis tribus marcis 
renunciaverunt, propter quod ego Robertus de Campaniis pre- 
fatis religiosis predictas tres marcas assignavi in terra mea de 
Castelton de Borg in Galwythia, percipiendas in perpetuum 
singulis annis de dicta terra mea de Castelton, die sancte 
trinitatis, sibi et successoribus suis per certum nuncium ad hec 
destinatum per manus meas et heredum meorum, vel assigna- 



CHARTER OF R. DE CAMPANIIS 139 

torum, vel tenencium meorum quicunque dictam terram pro 
tempore tenuerint. Volo eciam et concede et hac presen |ti carta [M fff\. 
mea confirmo pro me et heredibus meis et assignatis, ut predict! 
religiosi predictas tres marcas sine aliqua molestia, gravamine, 
vel contradiccione annuatim percipiant, et in puram, liberam 
et perpetuam elimosinam habeant et possideant. Et ne in 
posterum predicti religiosi in percepcione dictarum trium 
marcarum aliquam molestiam paciantur, oblige me et heredes 
meos et assignatos, corporali super hoc in presencia dictorum 
judicum prestito juramento, quod predictam terram in qua 
eisdem assignavi dictas tres marcas nunquam ego vel heredes 
mei, sive assignati alienabimus per quod impediantur easdem 
tres marcas statuto termino percipere. Suppono eciam me et 
heredes meos et assignatos ac tenentes meos dicte terre juris- 
diccioni venerabilium patrum Sancti Andree et Candide case 
episcoporum qui pro tempore fuerint ; Ita quod si aliquando 
cessatum fuerit termino statuto a dictarum trium marcarum 
solucione, vel prefati religiosi aliquod impedimentum incur- 
rerint in perceptione dictarum trium marcarum per me uel per 
heredes meos uel assignatos siue per dicte terre tenentes meos 
seu per quemcunque alium de meis vel meorum nomine, dicti 
episcopi vel eorum alter, qui fuerit ex parte dictorum abbatis 
et conventus requisitus, me et heredes meos et assignatos ac 
dicte terre tenentes meos, ac quoscunque alios meo vel meorum 
nomine impedientes quo minus dicti religiosi dictas tres 
marcas sine molestia et gravamine possint libere percipere, 
tantum unica monicione premissa, possint vel possit vinculo 
excommunicacionis innodare, nuncquam relaxande quousque 
dictis religiosis de totali prefato redditu trium marcarum, 
dampnis, expensis, et interesse, plenarie fuerit satisfactum, nisi 
generalis guerra fuerit in terra. Super cessacione vero solucionis 
dictarum trium marcarum ad terminum statutum, expensis, 
dampnis, et interesse simplici assercioni procuratoris dictorum 
abbatis et conventus quicunque fuerit ad hoc constitutus, fides 
plene adhibebitur, sine onere alicujus probacionis. Prefati 
vero monachi ad peticionem meam caritative concesserunt 
michi ut singulis diebus in perpetuum in ecclesia sua fiat 
specialis commemoracio in una missa pro animabus patris mei et 
domini Roberti de Campaniis et omnium fidelium defunctorum, 



140 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

juxta tenorem dicte carte domini Willelmi de Campaniis, 
quamquidem cartam michi post confeccionem presentis scripti 
resignaverunt. Et ut hec omnia rata et inconcussa permaneant 
in perpetuum present! scripto sigillum meum apposui : Et ad 
majorem securitatem et testimonium, predict! domini episcopi 
et dominus Rogerus de Quency Comes Wynton et Constabu- 
larius Scocie ad peticionem meam eidem Scripto sigilla sua 
pariter apposuerunt. Datum apud Borg sabbato proximo ante 
dominicam in ramis palmarum, anno domini M. cc. lx. 

(Abstract) 
e CHARTER of SIR ROBERT DE CAMPANIIS.' 

To all Christ's faithful, etc., Robert de Campaniis, etc. He relates 
that with the authority of the Pope a suit was instituted before judges 
delegate between the Abbot and Convent of Lundors, of the one part, 
and him of the other part, in respect to the annual payment of three 
marks, granted in pure and perpetual alms to the abbot and convent 
by Sir William de Campaniis (to whom Sir Robert succeeded by 
right of heirship), for himself and his heirs, and assigned to be paid in 
his land of Stokes in the county of Leicester, as was more fully con- 
tained in the charter of the said Sir William, signed with his seal, the 
tenor of which was as follows : ' To all who shall see or hear this writ 
William de Campaniis, greeting. Let all of you know that I have given, 
granted, and by this my present charter confirmed, to God and the 
Church of St. Mary and St. Andrew of Lundors, and the monks now 
serving God, or who shall hereafter serve God, in that place, for the weal 
of the soul of my father, Robert de Campaniis, who is buried there, and 
for the souls of all my ancestors and successors, in pure and perpetual 
alms, three marks of silver to be yearly received of me and my heirs at 
Whitsunday, in my land of Stokes in the county of Leicester. And the 
monks aforesaid have charitably granted, at my petition, that there 
should be sung every day for ever a mass at the altar of St. Nicholas in 
the same church, in which mass special commemoration would be made 
for the soul of my father and for the souls of all the faithful departed. 
And that this my gift may be established and secure for ever I have 
affixed my seal to the present writ. Witnesses, .... At length 
I, Robert, having appeared before the judges, and having examined 
the contents of the charter aforesaid, not being cancelled, abrogated, 
or in any part vitiated, acknowledged that I and my heirs were bound 
for ever to pay yearly to the aforesaid abbot and convent three marks 
sterling at the feast of Whitsunsday, according to the tenor of the afore- 
said charter. After this acknowledgment made in court, the dispute 
was brought to a close, through the intervention of the judges delegate 
and other trustworthy men, in the manner following : the aforesaid 






CHARTER OF R. DE CAMPANIIS 141 

abbot and convent at my petition have remitted to me all the arrears, 
damages, and costs which they sought from me in court by reason of 
my not having paid the said three marks from the time of the death of 
the said Sir William de Campaniis up to the Friday next after the 
feast of St. Matthias the Apostle, 1 in the year of grace MCCLIX ; and, 
moreover, they have renounced the assigning of the payment of the 
three marks in the land of Stokes, as was made to the said abbot 
and convent. On account of which I, Robert de Campaniis, have 
assigned to the aforesaid religious the aforesaid three marks in my 
land of Castelton of Borg, in Galwythia, to be received each year, for 
ever, out of my said land of Castelton, on the day of the Holy Trinity, 2 
by them and their successors, through their certified agent (per cer- 
ium nuncium), at the hands of me, and my heirs, or assignees, or 
my tenants, who for the time shall hold the said land. I also will 
and grant for me, my heirs and assignees, that the aforesaid religious 
should yearly receive the aforesaid three marks, without any annoyance, 
trouble, or objection, and should have and possess them in free, pure, and 
perpetual alms. And to the end that in future the aforesaid religious 
should not suffer any annoyance in receiving the said three marks, I 
oblige myself, my heirs and assignees, by my corporal oath thereupon 
taken in the presence of the said judges, that I, my heirs and assignees, 
will never alienate the said land in which I have assigned to them the 
said three marks, by which alienation they might be hindered in receiv- 
ing the same three marks at the appointed term. And I subject myself, 
my heirs and assignees, and my tenants of the same land to the jurisdic- 
tion of the venerable fathers, the Bishops of St. Andrews and Galloway 
(Candida Casa) from time to time, so that if there be any stoppage in the 
payment of the said three marks at the appointed term, or if the afore- 
said religious are hindered in any way from receiving the said three 
marks by me or my heirs, or my assignees, or by my tenants of the said 
land, or by any other of mine, or in the name of mine, the said bishops, or 
either of them, who shall be so requested on the part of the said abbot and 
convent, may, after one monition only, place under the bond of excom- 
munication me, my heirs, assignees, tenants of the said land, and any 
others whomsoever, who in my name or the name of mine, hinder the 
said religious from freely receiving the said three marks without trouble 
or annoyance, such excommunication to be never relaxed until full 
satisfaction be made to the said religious for the whole of the three 
marks, damages, costs, and interest, unless in the case of there being a 
general war in the country. 

As regards the stoppage of the payment of the three marks aforesaid 
at the appointed term, and as regards costs, damages, and interest, 
full credence is to be given to the simple statement of the proctor of the 



1 This festival in ordinary years fell on 24th February ; but in leap years on 
25th February. The year here indicated is 1259-60, which was a leap year. 

2 The Sunday next after Whitsunday. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

said abbot and convent, whoever shall happen to be appointed to that 
office, without putting on him any burden of proof. The aforesaid 
monks, at my request, have, of their charity, granted to me that they 
will make every day, for ever, special commemoration in one mass for the 
souls of my father and of Sir Robert de Campaniis, and of all the faithful 
departed, according to the tenor of the charter of Sir William de Cam- 
paniis, which charter they resigned to me after the execution of the 
present writ. And that all these things may be established and secure 
for ever, I have put my seal to the present writ. And for the greater 
security, and for testimony, the aforesaid lords, the bishops, and Lord 
Roger de Quency, Earl of Wynton and Constable of Scotland, have 
likewise at my request put their seals to the present writ. Given at 
Borg, on the Saturday next before Palm Sunday, in the year of our Lord 



CXIV 

De conuencione facta inter abbatem et conuentum 
de Lundores et Willelmum de Brechyn. 

ANNO gracie millesimo ducentesimo sexagesimo primo die 
sabbati proxima post festum Sancti Martini in hyeme. Apud 
Lundors facta est hec Convencio inter Abbatem et conventum 
monasterii de Lundors ex una parte et dominum Willelmum 
de Brechynch ex altera, videlicet, quod cum terra ejusdem 
domini Willelmi, de Lundors, de Bondington, de Kyndeloich, et 
terra quondam Galfridi Maupetyt, tenerentur molendino 
dictorum abbatis et conventus ad sectam et multuram tanquam 
ad molendinum scyre de Lundors, quod est ipsorum abbatis et 
conventus ex donacione inclite recordacionis Comitis David, 
iidem abbas et conventus pro se et suis successoribus in per- 
petuum quietam clamaverunt dicto domino Willelmo et suis 
heredibus et eorum hominibus in dictis terris manentibus 
dictam sectam et multuram de dictis terris de Lundors, de 
Bondyngton, et de Kyndeloich, et de terra quondam Galfridi 
Maupetyt. Ita ut nee dictus dominus Willelmus nee heredes 
sui nee eorum homines in dictis terris manentes de cetero com- 
[foi. 80.] pelli possint racione alicujus juris vel consuetudinis ad dictam 
sectam vel multuram. Dictus autem dominus Willelmus pro 
dicta quieta clamacione in recompensacionem dicte secte et 
multure dedit et concessit dictis abbati et conventui et monas- 
1 The Saturday before Palm Sunday in the year 1260 fell on 27th March. 



DISPUTE AS TO MULTURE 143 

terio de Lundors in perpetuum triginta tres solidos et quatuor 
denarios sterlingorum annuos, in liberam, puram et perpetuam 
elimosinam, percipiendos annuatim de terra sua et heredum 
suorum de Lundors per manus ballivi sui, vel firmarii, seu fir- 
mariorum suorum de Lundors, vel quorumcumque aliorum, quo- 
cumque nomine censeantur, qui dictam terram tenuerint : 
medietatem uidelicet ad Pentecosten et aliam medietatem ad 
festum Sancti Martini in hyeme. Ita ut si infra octo dies cujus- 
cunque termini de porcione ejusdem termini non fuerit eisdem 
abbati etconventui satisfactum,liceat eisdem abbati etconventui 
namos dicti domini Willelmi, vel heredum suorum, seu hominum 
suorum, vel firmariorum suorum in dictis terris manencium, 
nulla alia licencia petita, capere, et tarn diu detinere nulli 
replegiandos, vel ad vadium dandos, seu aliquo alio modo libe- 
randos, quousque eisdem abbati et conventui de porcione non 
soluta fuerit plenarie satisfactum. Concessit eciam dictus 
dominus Willelmus pro se et heredibus suis quod dicte terre 
nulli darentur nee alienarentur quin eedem a terre ad dictum an- a MS. eat/em. 
nuum redditum triginta trium solidorum et quatuor denariorum 
eisdem abbati et conventui sub convencionibus predictis 
annuatim persolvendum remaneant obligate. Concessit insuper 
dictus dominus Willelmus pro se et heredibus suis et suis 
assignatis in perpetuum dictis abbati et conventui ut cursus 
aque que descendit de magno lacu de Lundors ad molendinum 
eorundem abbatis et con vent us nullo modo impediatur pei 
molendinum ipsius domini Willelmi vel heredum suorum, set 
ipsam aquam ita liberam habeant prout illam habere consue- 
verunt et debiierunt ex donacione Comitis David : In cujus rei 
testimonium uni parti istius scripti, in modum cirograffi con- 
fecti, residenti penes dictum dominum Willelmum appositum 
est sigillum commune monasterii de Lundors, et alii parti 
remanenti penes dictos abbatem et conventum sigillum domini 
Willelmi de Brechynch est appensum, ad majorem securitatem 
omnium predictorum. 

(Abstract) 

' OF an AGREEMENT made between the ABBOT and CONVENT of LUNDORS 
and WILLIAM of BRECHIN. ' 

IN the year of grace MCCLXI., on the Saturday next after the feast of 
St. Martin in winter [Nov. 11], this agreement was made between the 



144 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Abbot aud Convent of the monastery of Lundors of the one part, and 
Sir William of Brechyn, of the other part, to wit, that, since the lands 
of Lundors, Bondington, and Kyndeloich, and the land of the late 
Geoffrey Maupetyt, all of them belonging to the same William of 
Brechin, are thirled to the mill of the said abbot and convent in suit 
and multure, as if to the mill of the shire (scyre) of Lundors, which 
belongs to the abbot and convent by the gift of Earl David, of illustrious 
memory, the same abbot and convent for themselves and their successors 
have quitclaimed for ever to the said Sir William and his heirs, and to 
their men residing in the said lands, the said suit and multure from the 
lands of Lundors, Bondyngton, Kyndeloich, and from the land which was 
held by the late Geoffrey Maupetit, so that in future neither the said 
Sir William, nor his heirs, nor their men residing in the said lands, 
can be compelled to render the said suit and multure by reason of any 
right or custom. But in return for the said quitclaim, in consideration 
of the said suit and multure [thus surrendered], William of Brechin 
gives and grants to the said abbot and convent for ever thirty-three 
shillings and fourpence sterling, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, to be 
received yearly out of his land of Lundors by the hands of his bailiff, or his 
farmer or farmers, or by those whomsoever, by whatever name they may 
be called, who shall hold the said land. Half of this money shall be paid 
at Whitsunday, and the other half at the feast of St. Martin in winter. 
If within eight days after each term the abbot and convent have not 
received full satisfaction for the portion due at that term, the abbot and 
convent may, without seeking leave from any, take poinds (namos) from 
the said Sir William, or his heirs, or his men, or his farmers, residing 
in those lands. Such poinds were not to be repledged, or given at wad 
(ad vadium), or delivered up in any other manner, until full satisfaction 
has been given to the abbot and convent for the portion not paid. The 
said Sir William also grants for himself and his heirs that the said lands 
shall not be given or alienated to any, but that they shall remain under 
obligation for the yearly payment of the thirty-three shillings and four- 
pence to the abbot and convent, under the agreement aforesaid. More- 
over, the said Sir William has granted to the abbot and convent for 
himself, his heirs, and assignees, that the flow of water which comes 
down from the great lake of Lundors to the mill of the abbot and con- 
vent shall in no way be obstructed by the mill of the said Sir William 
or his heirs, but that they shall have that water as free as they were 
accustomed and were entitled to have it by the gift of Earl David. In 
testimony of which this writ is executed in the form of an indenture, 
one part of which, sealed with the common seal of the monastery, shall 
be kept by William of Brechin, and the other part, sealed with the seal 
of William, shall remain with the abbot and convent, for the greater 
security of all things aforesaid. 



CHARTER OF ALAN DURWARD 145 

CXV 
De Inirberwyn. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus presentes literas visuris vel audituris 
Alanus Hostiarius, Salutem eternam in domino. Noverit univer- 
sitas vestra nos dedisse, concessisse, et hac presenti carta nostra 
confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie de Lundors et 
Monachis ibidem Deo servientibus et inperpetuum servituris, 
in liberam, puram et perpetuam elemosinam, totum illud toftum 
quod fuit quondam Ade clerici in Inirbervyn ; Ita quod nee nos 
nee aliquis heredum nostrorum vel successor um aliquid ab eis 
de dicto tofto inposterum exigamus vel exigere possimus, nisi 
omnimodo oraciones ad salutem animarum. In cujus rei testi- 
monium eisdem super hoc has literas nostras fieri fecimus 
patentes, et sigillo nostro muniri. His testibus, dominis 
Roberto Byseth, Thoma Hostiario, David de Cambrun rectore 
ecclesie de Lundyn rothery. Apud Sconam, die dominica 
proxima post festum Sancti Barnabe apostoli, anno gracie M 
CC Lx vj to . 

(Abstract) 
' OF INIRBERWYN. ' 

To all the faithful of Christ, etc., Alan Durward (Hostiarius), etc. 
He grants to Lundors in frankalmoign the whole of that toft which was 
held by the late Adam, clerk 1 in Inirbervyn, so that neither he [Dur- 
ward] nor his heirs or successors might exact anything in future because 
of the said toft, save only prayers for the weal of souls. ' In testimony 
of which thing we have caused our letters to be made patent to the same, 
and to be fortified with our seal.' Witnesses, ... At Scone, on the 
Sunday next after the feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle [June II], 2 in 
the year of grace MCCLXVI. 

CXVI 

De Villa Willelmi in Garuiach. Nota eciam de [/<>* si.] 
secundis decimis. 

OMNIBVS Christi fidelibus presentes litteras visuris vel audituris 
Robertus de Brus dominus Vallis Anandie, eternam in domino 
Salutem. Noverit universitas vestra nos, pro salute anime nostre 
et Isabelle sponse nostre et pro animabus puerorum nostrorum 
et omnium antecessorum et successorum nostrorum, dedisse, con- 

1 Or a proper name, 'Adam Clerk.' 

2 This Sunday was 1 3th June in 1266. 



146 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

cessisse,et present! carta nostra confirmasse viris religiosis,abbati 
et conventui de Lundors, terram nostram que dicitur villa Wil- 
lelmi in Garviach, que jacet inter terras eorum de Lethgaven 
et Wrangham, Et terram nostram de Bondes juxta Caskyben 
in parochia de Inverury, in escambium secundarum decimarum 
quasidem abbas et conventus consueverunt percipere annuatim 
de terris nostris, lucris, placitis, et eschaetis, et omnibus aliis 
rebus nostris infra terram nostram et extra, ultra Moneth, in 
Garviach ex dono Comitis David avi nostri, sic quod in carta 
dicti Comitis David plenius continetur. Quare volumus et 
concedimus ut predicti abbas et conventus et eorum successores 
in perpetuum habeant, teneant,et possideant predictas terras per 
rectas divisas suas cum omnibus communis libertatibus, liberis 
consuetudinibus, aisiamentis, et omnibus pertinenciis ad dictas 
terras spectantibus, in liberam, puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
adeo libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia 
vel domus religionis in toto regno Scocie aliquam elemosinam 
liberius, quiecius, plenius, et honorificencius tenet et possidet. 
Ita quod nobis succedencium nullus aliquid ab eis racione pre- 
dictarum terrarum, nisi solas oraciones ad salutem animarum, 
exigere possit. Nos vero et heredes nostri predictas terras cum 
omnibus communis libertatibus, liberis consuetudinibus, et 
asiamentis suis, et omnibus pertinenciis suis ad easdem terras 
spectantibus, prefatis abbati et conventui ac eorum successoribus 
contra omnes homines et feminas warentizabimus, defendemus, 
et adquietabimus in perpetuum ab omni seculari auxilio et 
exercitu, et ab omni alio servicio, servitute, exactione, et de- 
manda seculari. In cujus rei testimonium presens scriptum 
sigilli nostri apposicione roboravimus. Hiis testibus, venerabili 
patre domino Ricardo Episcopo Aberdonensi, Dominis Bar- 
tholome Flandrensi, Andrea de Garviach, Ada de Cartres, 
Willelmo de Sancto Michaele, militibus, Johanne de Sancto 
Michaele, Jacobo de Ouen, Ada de Ran, Roberto Russel, 
Henrico Engleys, Andrea de Porteriston, Roberto de Brechyn, 
et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

' OF WILLIAM'S VILL in GARVIACH : also a note concerning SECOND 
TITHES.' 

To all Christ's faithful, etc., Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale, etc. 
1 For the weal of our soul and of Isabella our spouse and for the souls of 



CHARTER OF ROBERT DE BRUS 147 

our children, and of all our ancestors and successors' he grants to 
Lundors his land which is called the vill of William in Garviach, which 
lies between their [the monks'] lands of Lethgaven and Wrangham, and 
his land of Bondes near Caskyben, in the parish of Inverury, ' in ex- 
change for the second tithes which the abbot and convent were ac- 
customed to receive annually from our lands, gains, pleas, and escheats, 
and all our other property, both within and without our land, beyond the 
Mounth in Garviach, of the gift of Earl David, our grandfather, as in 
the charter of the said Earl David is more fully contained.' The abbot 
and convent and their successors are to have, hold, and possess the 
said lands by their right marches, with all liberties of commonage, free 
customs, easements, and other pertinents in free, pure and perpetual 
alms, as freely, fully, etc. , as any abbey or house of religion in the 
whole kingdom of Scotland, etc. None of his successors were to demand 
anything by reason of the said lands save only prayers for the weal of 
souls. He grants for himself and his heirs warrandice ( against all men 
and women,' and promises to be answerable for all secular service, aid, 
and military service (exercitu), etc. His seal attached. Witnesses . . . 



CXVII 

Item de eadem terra Willelmi, de Letgauen, de 
Wrangham, et de terra de Bondes. Item nota 
de secundis decimis. 

ALEXANDER del gracia rex Scottorum Omnibus probis ho- 
minibus tocius terre sue, sal LI tern. Sciatis nos concessisse 
et hac present! carta nostra confirmasse donacionem illam 
quam Robertus de Brus fecit religiosis viris abbati et con- 
ventui de Lundors, de terra sua que dicitur villa Willelmi in 
Garviach, que jacet inter terras eorundem abbatis et conventus 
de Lethgaven et de Wrangham, et de terra sua de Bondes 
juxta Caskyben in parrochia de Inverury, in escambium 
secundarum decimarum quas idem abbas et conventus con- 
sueverunt percipere annuatim de terris eiusdem Roberti, et 
lucris, placitis, eschaetis, et omnibus aliis rebus dicti Roberti 
infra terram suam et extra, ultra Moneth, in Garviach, ex 
dono Comitis David ; Tenendam et habendam eisdem abbati et 
conventui et suis successoribus in perpetuum adeo libere, quiete, 
ple[narie et honorifice sicut carta eiusdem Roberti dictis abbati [foi. 82.] 
et conventui exinde confecta plenius juste testatur; Salvo 



148 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

servicio nostro. Testibus, Willelmo Archidiacono Sancti 
Andree Cancellario, Johanne de Dundemor, Johanne de Parco, 
et Willelmo de Sancto Claro. Apud Kynros, vicesimo nono die 
Augusti, Anno Regni nostri tercio decimo. 

(Abstract) 

e LIKEWISE concerning the same land of WILLIAM, concerning LETH- 
GAVEN, concerning WHANGHAM, and concerning the land of BONDES. 
Likewise a NOTE concerning SECOND TITHES.' 

' ALEXANDER, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of 
his whole land, greeting.' The king confirms the donation of Robert de 
Brus as recorded in the preceding charter, ( saving our service.' Wit- 
nesses, William, Archdeacon of St. Andrews, chancellor ; John of 
Dundemor ; John of Park ; William of St. Clair. At Kynros, 29th day of 
August, in the thirteenth year of our reign. 1 



CXVIII 
De donacione Henrici de Hastinges de Flandres. 

OMNIBVS Christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Henricus de Hastinges, eternam in domino salutem. Noverit 
universitas vestra me pro salute anime mee et omnium ante- 
cessorum et successorum meorum dedisse, concessisse, et presenti 
carta meo confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte Marie et sancti 
Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem Deo servientibus et 
in perpetuum servituris totam villam meam de Flandres in 
Garviach per rectas divisas suas, quas habuit tempore hujus 
donacionis mee, in escambium secundarum decimarum quas 
consueverunt percipere de terris meis ultra moneth. de dono 
Comitis David avi mei, sic quod plenius continetur in carta 
ejusdem Comitis David; Tenendam et habendam de me et 
heredibus meis eisdem monachis et eorum successoribus in 
perpetuum cum omnibus justis pertinenciis suis, juribus, et 
asiamentis ad dictam villam juste pertinentibus, ut predictum 
est, in liberam, puram et perpetuam elemosinam, libere, quiete, 
integre, pacifice, et honorifice in bosco et piano, in pratis et 
pascuis, in moris, maresiis, et petariis, in aquis et molendinis, in 
stagnis, vivariis, et piscariis, in viis et semitis, et in omnibus 

1 29th August 1261. 



GRANT BY HENRY DE HASTINGES 149 

aliis pertinenciis suis sicut superius dictum est. Ego vero Henri- 
cus et heredes mei seu successores mei, quicumque pro tempore 
fuerint, predictam villam 1 cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, 
sicut dictum est, tanquam liberam, puram, et perpetuam 
elemosinam predictis monachis et eorum successoribus contra 
omnes homines et feminas warentizabimus, defendemus, et ab 
omnibus auxiliis, exercitibus, et aliis omnimodis forinsecis 
serviciis adquietabimus. Volo itaque et concede ut predict! 
monachi predictam villam, ut dictum est, teneant et habeant 
quietam et liberam ab omni exaccione, consuetudine, et de- 
manda, et ab omnibus aliis secularibus serviciis que per me vel 
heredes meos seu successores aliquo tempore exigi poterunt vel 
extorqueri, Ita quod nee ego nee aliquis michi succedencium 
aliquid ab eis exigere presumamus nisi tantummodo oraciones 
ad animarum salutem. In cujus rei testimonium presens 
scriptum sigilli mei apposicione roboravi. Hiis testibus etc. 

(Abstract) 
' OF the GIFT of FLANDRES made by HENRY of HASTINGES.' 

To all Christ's faithful, etc., Henry of Hastinges, etc. For the weal 
of his soul, and of the souls of all his ancestors and successors, he grants 
to Lundors ' my whole vill of Flandres in Garviach, by its right marches 
which it had at the time of this grant in exchange for the second tithes 
which the monks of Lundors were accustomed to receive ' from his lands 
beyond the Mounth ' by the gift of Earl David, my grandfather, as in the 
charter of the said Earl David is more fully contained.' Flandres was to be 
held by the monks of Henry and his successors for ever with all the just 
pertinents, rights, and easements pertaining to the said vill, in free, 
pure, and perpetual alms ... f in wood and plain, meadows and 
pastures, moors, marshes, and petaries, waters and mills, stanks, live- 
pools (vivariis), and fisheries, in roads and paths, and all other pertinents. 
He and his successors give warrandice ' against all men and women. ' 
Further, he promises for himself and his successors to be answerable for 
all aids, hostings (exercitibus), and for all forinsec services, and from all 
exactions, demands, and other secular services which could be exacted 
from him, his heirs, or successors at any time. Neither he nor his 
successors will presume to exact anything from the monks save only 
prayers for the weal of souls. In testimony his seal is affixed. These 
being witnesses, etc. 2 

1 Before the word predictam the word ad appears in the MS. , but it is sub- 
punctuated. 

2 The names of the witnesses are not recorded. 



150 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

CXIX 
De Confirmacione de Flandris. 

ALEXANDER del gratia Rex Scottorum Omnibus probis 
hominibus tocius terre sue, salutem. Sciatis nos concessisse et 
hac presenti carta nostra confirmasse donacionem illam quam 
Henricus de Hastinges, miles, fecit deo et ecclesie sancte marie 
et sancti andre[e] de Lundors et Monachis ibidem Deo ser- 
vientibus et in perpetuum servituris de tota villa sua de 
Flandres in Garviach per rectas divisas suas, quas habuit 
tempore ejtisdem donacionis sue, in escambium secundarum 
decimarum quas consueverunt percipere de terris suis ultra le 
Moneth, de dono Comitis David avi sui : Tenenda et habenda 
eisdem monachis et eorum successoribus in perpetuum de dicto 
Henrico et heredibus suis, cum omnibus juribus, aisiamentis et 
S3.] pertinenciis ad ipsam | villam juste spectantibus, adeo libere, 
quiete, plenarie, et honorifice sicut carta ipsius Henrici eisdem 
monachis exinde confecta plenius juste testatur; Salvo ser- 
vicio nostro. Testibus, &c. 

(Abstract) 
' OF the CONFIRMATION of FLANDRES/ 

' ALEXANDER, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of his 
whole land, greeting.' He confirms that gift which Henry of Hastinges, 
knight, made, as in his charter is more fully contained, ' saving our 
service.' Witnesses, etc. 1 

cxx 

De confirmacione a prima fundacione. 

ALEXANDER dei gratia Rex Scottorum Omnibus probis 
hominibus tocius terre sue, salutem. Sciant presentes et futuri 
nos abbati et conventui de Lundors concessisse ut habeant et 
teneant, in liberam, puram et perpetuam elemosinam, omnes 
terras suas quas habuerunt et tenuerunt a prima fundacione 
domus sue de Lundors cum omnibus libertatibus quibus uti 
consueverunt, et quod quieti sint de auxiliis, exercitibus, et 
aliis forinsecis serviciis de terris predictis. Quare firmiter pro- 

1 The names of the witnesses are not transcribed. 



CONFIRMATIONS BY ALEXANDERS II. AND III. 151 

hib..nus ne quis eos contra hanc concessionem nostram in- 
juste vexare presumat super nostram plenariam forisfacturam. 

Testibus, etc. 

(Abstract) 

e OF the CONFIRJIATION of lands of LUNDORS from the FIRST 
FOUNDATION.' 

ALEXANDER, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of his 
whole land, etc. Let those present and to come know that we have 
granted to the Abbot and Convent of Lundors that they should have and 
hold in free, pure, and perpetual alms, all their lands which they have 
had and held from the first foundation of their house of Lundors with all 
liberties which they have been accustomed to use, and that they should 
be quit of aids, hostings, and other forinsec services due from the afore- 
said lands. Wherefore ' on [pain of] our full forfeiture ' we strictly 
prohibit any one from presuming to trouble them unjustly, contrary to 
this our grant. Witnesses, etc. 1 

CXXI 

Item de confirmacione. 

ALEXANDER dei gracia Rex Scottorum Omnibus probis 
hominibus tocius terre sue, salutem. Sciant presentes et futuri 
nos concessisse et hac carta nostra confirmasse abbati et con- 
ventui de Lundors concessionem illam quam dominus A. bone 
memorie illustris rex, pater noster, fecit eisdem, videlicet, ut 
habeant et teneant, in liberam, puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
omnes terras suas quas habuerunt et tenuerunt a prima fun- 
dacione domus sue de Lundors, cum omnibus libertatibus 
quibus uti consueverunt, et quod quieti sint de auxiliis, exer- 
citibus, et aliis forinsecis serviciis de predictis terris. Quare 
firmiter prohibemus ne quis contra hanc concessionem nostram 
eos injuste vexare presumat super nostram plenariam forisfac- 
turam. Testibus, etc. 

(Abstract) 
' LIKEWISE of the CONFIRMATION.' 

( ALEXANDER, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men,' etc. 
He confirms to Lundors that grant which his father King Alexander [11.], 
of good memory, made, in terms of the preceding charter. Witnesses, 
etc. 1 



The names of the witnesses are not transcribed. 



152 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

CXXII 
De mandate Regis Alexandri. 

ALEXANDER del gratia rex Scottorum Justiciariis, vicecomiti- 
bus, et omnibus aliis ballivis tocius terre sue ad quos presentes 
littere pervenerint, salutem. Mandamus vobis et precipimus 
Quatinus permittatis abbatem et conventum de Lundors 
gaudere eisdem libertatibus quibus tempore inclite recorda- 
cionis domini regis Alexandri, patris nostri, et nostro hactenus 
juste gavisi sunt et pacifice. Nee ipsos super eisdem liberta- 
tibus aliquo modo vexetis injuste, per quod ab eis justam 
querimoniam audiamus. Testibus, etc. 

(Abstract) 
f OF the MANDATE of KING ALEXANDER.' 

ALEXANDER, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to the justiciars, 
sheriffs, and all other the bailiffs of his whole land, etc. We command 
you and enjoin that ye permit the Abbot and Convent of Lundors to 
enjoy the same liberties which they have justly and peaceably enjoyed 
in the time of our father King Alexander [n.] of famous memory. Nor 
shall ye in any way trouble them unjustly upon these liberties, by 
reason of which a just complaint on their part might come to our hear- 
ing. Witnesses, etc. 1 

CXXIII 

De conuencione facta inter abbatem conuentum 
de Lundores et Gocelinum de Balliolo. 

ANNO ab incarnacione domini M cc sexagesimo, facta fuit 
hec convencio inter abbatem et conventum de Lundors, ex una 
parte, et dominum Gocelinum de Balliolo ex altera, videlicet, 
quod dicti abbas et conventus pro se et successoribus suis 
remiserunt et quietum clamaverunt in perpetuum dicto domino 
Gocelino omnimodas decimas, exceptis decimis garbarum quas 
consueverunt percipere de firmis et omnibus aliis lucrls et 
eschaetis terrarum suarum in Garviach, quas habuit ex dono 
Domini Johanni de balliolo fratris sui, et similiter omnium 
aliarum terrarum quas nobilis vir Comes de Marr tenuit de 

1 The names of the witnesses are not transcribed. 



GOCELIN DE BALLIOL 153 

dicto Domino Johanne de balliolo tempore quo facta fuit ista 
composicio, Pro qua quidem quieta clamacione et remissione 
dictus dominus Gocelinus pro se et heredibus suis dedit et 
concessit in escambium dictarum decimarum prefatis abbati et 
con vent ui et successoribus suis inperpetuum, in liberam, puram 
et perpetuam elemosinam, octo | marcas sex solidos et octo [foi. 84.] 
denarios sterlingorum singulis annis percipiendas in molendino 
suo de Inveralmeslei, uel in terra sua de balhagerdi si dictum 
molendinum deficiat, per manus firmariorum dicti molendini, 
vel dicte terre de balhagardi quicunque pro tempore fuerint, 
ad duos terminos anni, scilicet, medietatem ad festum Sancti 
Martini in hieme et alteram medietatem ad Pentecosten. 
Preterea predictus dominus Gocelinus pro se et heredibus suis 
dictis abbati et conventui et successoribus suis, in liberam et 
perpetuam elemosinam, dedit et concessit liberum cursum aque 
de Ouri, continentem quatuor pedes et dimidium in latitudine 
usque ad molendinum de Inchemabani, per medium terre sue 
quam habuit ex orientali parte Castri sui de Donidor, ubicunque 
dicti abbas et conventus voluerint : Ita tamen quod locum 
quern semel elegerint postmodum mutare non possint nisi de 
voluntate eius processerit. Et sciendum quod si processu 
temporis per inundacionem aque predictus cursus aque excre- 
verit vel ampliatus fuerit ultra predictos quatuor pedes et 
dimidium, illud predictis abbati et conventui nullo modo 
imputabitur, nee aliquam propter hoc sustinebunt jacturam 
sive molestiam, dum tamen ipsi abbas et conventus predictum 
cursum suo artificio non ampliaverint. In recognicione autem 
predicti cursus aque dabunt predicti abbas et conventus 
singulis annis predicto domino Gocelino et heredibus suis 
unum par cirotecarum albarum ad Penthecosten apud Cast rum 
suum de Donidor pro omni servicio, exactione, secta, et demanda 
seculari; Ita quod occasione predicti cursus aque prefatus 
dominus Gocelinus vel heredes sui nichil possint aliquo tem- 
pore exigere vel extorquere a predictis abbate et conventu nisi 
predictas cirotecas tantum. Preterea dictus dominus Gocelinus 
pro se et heredibus suis concessit quod nee ipse nee heredes sui 
predictum molendinum, vel predictam terram de Balhagerdi, 
aliquo genere alienacionis aliquo tempore alienabunt per quod 
dicti abbas et' conventus prefatas octo marcas sex solidos et 



154 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

octo denarios impediantur annuatim, ut dictum est, percipere. 
In cujus rei testimonium presens scriptum in modum cirograffi 
est confectum, cuius una pars sigillo predicti domini Gocelini 
signata penes sepenominatos abbatem et conventum remanet, 
et altera pars com muni sigillo capituli de Lundors penes 
prefatum dominum Gocelinum et heredes suos residet. 

' OF an AGREEJIENT made between the ABBOT and CONVENT of LUNDORS 
and GOCELIN DE BALLIOL. ' 

IN the year MCCLX. from the Incarnation of our Lord this agreement 
was made between the Abbot and Convent of Lundors, of the one part, 
and Sir Gocelin de Balliol, of the other part, to wit, that the abbot 
and convent for themselves and their successors have remitted and quit- 
claimed for ever to the said Sir Gocelin the tithes of all kinds, saving 
garbal tithes, which they have been accustomed to receive from the rents 
(firmis), and all other profits and escheats of his lands in Garviach, 
which he had of the gift of Sir John de Balliol, his brother, and like- 
wise those of all the other lands which the noble man, the Earl of Mar, 
held of the said Sir John de Balliol at the time when this agreement 
was made. For which quitclaim and remission the said Sir Gocelin, 
for himself and his heirs has given and granted for ever to the aforesaid 
abbot and convent and their successors, in free, pure, and perpetual 
alms, in exchange for the said tithes, eight marks, six shillings, and 
eight pence, sterling, to be received by them each year in the mill of 
Inveralmeslei, or in his land of Balhagerdi, if the said mill should be 
lacking [in the sum named] by the hands of the farmers of the said mill 
or of the said land of Balhagerdi, whoever they may be at the time, at 
the two terms of the year, to wit, half at the feast of St. Martin in 
winter, and the other half at Whitsunday. 

Moreover, the aforesaid Sir Gocelin, for himself and his heirs, lias 
given and granted in free and perpetual alms a free water-course from 
the Ouri, measuring four feet and a half in breadth, as far as the mill of 
Inchmabani, by the middle of the land which he has on the east of his 
castle of Bondor, wherever the said abbot and convent shall choose ; 
yet so that the place which they have once chosen they cannot after- 
wards change without his will. And let it be known that if in process 
of time the [size of the] aforesaid water-course shall be increased or 
enlarged by floods, beyond the aforesaid four feet and a half, this shall 
in no wise be imputed to the aforesaid abbot and convent, nor shall 
they on that account sustain any risk or trouble, so long as the abbot 
and convent themselves have not artificially enlarged the aforesaid 
water-course. But in recognition of the aforesaid water-course the afore- 
said abbot and convent shall give to the aforesaid Sir Gocelin and his 
heirs a pair of white gloves every year at Whitsunday at his castle of 
Bondor, in lieu of all service, exaction, suit, and secular demand. So 



GRANT BY ALEXANDER, EARL OF BUCHAN 155 

that on account of the aforesaid water-com-se the aforesaid Sir Gocelin 
and his heirs may not at any time exact or extort anything from the 
aforesaid abbot and convent, save only the aforesaid gloves. 

Moreover, the aforesaid Sir Gocelin has granted for himself and his 
heirs that neither he nor his heirs will at any time alienate the aforesaid 
mill or the aforesaid land of Balhagerdi by any kind of alienation, by 
reason of which the aforesaid abbot and convent might be hindered in 
receiving annually (as has been said) the aforesaid eight marks, six 
shillings, and eight pence. In testimony of which thing the present 
writ has been executed in the form of an indenture (cirograffi), of which 
one part, signed with the seal of the aforesaid Sir Gocelin, remains in 
possession of the often-named abbot and convent, and the other part, 
signed with the common seal of the chapter of Lundors, remains in the 
possession of the aforesaid Sir Gocelin and his heirs. 

CXXIV 
De x marcis in Kelle in Buchan. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum pervenerit 
Alexander Cumyn Comes de Buchan, salutem in domino 
sempiternam. Noverit universitas vestra nos dedisse, concessisse, 
et hac present! carta nostra confirmasse deo et ecclesie Sancte 
Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem Deo 
servientibus et inperpetuum servituris decem Marcas sterlin- 
gorum annuas in tenemento nostro de Kelly in Buchan, pro 
salute anime pie recordacionis domini Alexandri quondam 
regis Scotorum illustris, et pro salute anime nostre, et pro 
animabus omnium antecessorum et successorum nostrorum, 
in escambium terre de Kyncardinbegg, quam nobis dimiserunt 
et quietam clamaverunt in perpetuum. Quare volumus quod 
predicti monachi predictas decem marcas annuas in perpetuum 
percipiant et habeant de predicto tenemento nostro de Kelly 
in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam, adeo | libere et [foi. 86.] 
quiete, sicut aliqua elemosina in toto regno Scotie liberius datur 
vel ab aliquo possidetur. Et propter ipsorum comodum et 
quietem, et in augmentum elemosine nostre, obligamus nos et 
heredes nostros et quoslibet alios successores nostros ad solven- 
dum predictas decem marcas singulis annis apud Wrangham, 
infra octabas festi nativitatis Sancti Johannis baptiste, Abbati 
de Lundors vel monacho seu ballivo suo quicumque illuc 
venerit nomine eorundem monachorum. Et si contingat nos 



156 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

deficere in solucione predicte elemosine predictis loco et 
termino aliqua vice, quod absit, volumus et concedimus pro 
nobis et heredibus nostris ac successoribus quod liceat ballivo 
et hominibus predictorum monachorum post octabas prefatas 
namare predictum tenementum de Kelly, absque aliqua requisi- 
cione licencie, et namos captos absque aliqua replegiacione 
detinere usque ad octo dies post predictas octabas. Et si tune 
dicta elemosina non fuerit soluta, liceat eis dictam compulsionem 
vendere usque ad valorem elemosine predicte, et quod nullum 
impedimentum eis faciemus per nos vel nostros in capcione, 
detencione, seu vendicione dictorum namorum,dummodo dictum 
tenementum non fuerit ita devastatum guerra quod non 
remaneat in illo redditus decem marcarum, et si idem ibi 
remaneat illud habeant sine impedimento, ut predictum est. 
Subjicimus eciam nos et heredes nostros et quosque alios 
successores nostros et homines nostros dicti tenement! juris- 
diccioni Episcopi et archidiaconi Aberdonensium, vel eorum 
officialium, qui pro tempo re fuerint, quod ipsi vel eorum alter, 
qui super hoc fuerit requisitus ex parte dictorum monachorum,^ 
possint vel possit, unica tantum monicione premissa, nos 
compellere per sentencias excommunicacionis in personas, et 
interdicti in dictum tenementum, sive fuerit in warda sive extra 
wardam, nullo modo relaxandas vel suspendendas donee prefatis 
monachis de prefata elemosina plenarie fuerit satisfactum. 
Promittimus eciam et obligamus nos et heredes nostros quod 
nullo modo alienabimus predictum tenementum de Kelly nisi 
salva predictis monachis elemosina, compulsione, et submissione 
mem oratis ; Renunciantes plene et expresse pro nobis, heredi- 
bus et successoribus nostris, regie prohibicioni, omni appella- 
cioni, privilegio crucesignatis vel crucesignandis indulto vel 
indulgendo, omnibus litteris, privileges, et graciis, inpetratis vel 
inpetrandis a quacumque curia seculari vel ecclesiastica, omni 
legi et statute, omni exceptione, et defensioni reali et personali 
juris et statuti, que pro parte nostra poterunt opponi contra 
hoc instrumentum vel factum. Et nos et heredes nostri 
predictas decem marcas annuas prefatis monachis contra omnes 
homines et feminas warendizabimus, acquietabimus, et defende- 
mus inperpetuum. In cujus rei testimonium presens scriptum 
fieri fecimus et sigillo nostro muniri. Et propter absenciam 



GRANT BY ALEXANDER, EARL OF BUCHAN 157 

domini episcopi Aberdonensis, Dominus W. episcopus Sancti 
Andree ad preces nostras sigillum suum apposuit huic scripto. 
Hiis testibus, domino Willelmo Dei gracia episcopo Sancti 
Andree, domino Andrea Abbate de Cupro, dominis Willelmo 
de Montealto, Willelmo Cumyn, Fergus Cumyn, Johanne 
Wyschard, Gilberto Scot, militibus, Waldeuo rectore ecclesie de 
fovern, Roberto de Lech rectore ecclesie de Slanys, Ricardo 
rectore ecclesie de essy, Et Rogero pater noster, glericis 
nostris, Duncano judice, dauit filio Kyneth de Neuticbyr 1 et 
multis aliis. 

OF TEN MARKS in KELLE in BUCHAN. 

To all Christ's faithful to whom the present writ shall come, Alexander 
Cumyn, Earl of Buchan, health everlasting- in the Lord. Let all of you 
know that we have given, and granted, and by this present charter have 
confirmed to God and the church of St. Mary and St. Andrew of Lundors 
and the monks who are there serving God, or who shall serve Him 
in all time coming-, ten marks sterling each year in our holding 
(tenemento) of Kelle in Buchan, for the weal of the soul of our lord, 
Alexander, late illustrious King of the Scots, of pious memory, and for 
the weal of our soul, and for the souls of all our ancestors and successors, 
in exchange for the land of Kyncardinbegg, which they have surrendered 
to us and quitclaimed to us for ever. Wherefore we will that the afore- 
said monks shall receive and have the aforesaid ten marks yearly for ever 
from our aforesaid holding of Kelly in free, pure, and perpetual alms as 
freely and quietly as any alms in the whole kingdom of Scotland is most 
freely given and possessed by any one. And with a view to their con- 
venience and quiet, and as enhancement of our alms, we oblige ourselves 
and our heirs, and any others, our successors, to pay the aforesaid ten 
marks every year at Wrangham within the octave of the feast of the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist [June 24] to the Abbot of Lundors, 
or to a monk, or to his bailiff, whomsoever shall come thither in the 
name of the same monks. And if on any occasion we fail, which God 
forbid, in the payment of the aforesaid alms at the aforesaid place and 
term, we will and grant for ourselves, our heirs, and successors, that it 
shall be lawful for the bailiff and men of the aforesaid monks after the 
octave before named to poind (namare) the aforesaid holding of Kelly, 
without any request for leave, and to detain the goods seized (namos) 
without any replegiation, until eight days after the aforesaid octave. 
And if then the said alms shall not have been paid, it shall be lawful for 
them to sell the said distress (compulsionem) up to the value of the afore- 

1 The reading of this word is very doubtful. It may possibly be read 
' Neuticlyr. ' There is also a doubt whether the third letter of the word is ' n ' 



158 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

said alms ; and we shall cause no hindrance by ourselves or by ours in 
the seizure, detention, or sale of the aforesaid poinds, so long as the 
said holding shall not have been so devastated by war that there does 
not remain in it a return of ten marks ; and if the same does remain in 
it, they may have it without hindrance, as has been said. 

We also subject ourselves and our heirs and our other successors, 
whosoever they may be, and our men of the same holding (tenement!) to 
the jurisdiction of the Bishop and Archdeacon of Aberdeen, or their 
officials, for the time being, so that they, or any one of them, who shall 
be required on the part of the said monks, can after only one monition 
previously given, compel us, by sentences of excommunication against 
persons, and interdict against the said holding, whether it be in ward or 
out of ward ; such sentences to be in no wise relaxed or suspended until 
full satisfaction shall have been made to the aforesaid monks for the 
aforesaid alms. 

Moreover, we promise and oblige ourselves and our heirs that we will 
not alienate in any way the aforesaid holding of Kelly, unless the alms 
is secured to the aforesaid monks by the compulsion and submission 
which have been mentioned. We renounce fully and expressly for our- 
selves, our heirs, and our successors, any royal prohibition, appeal, 
privilege granted, or to be granted, as indulgence to those who either 
now or hereafter be Crusaders ; all letters, privileges, and graces, procured, 
or hereafter to be procured, from any secular or ecclesiastical court 
whatsoever ; every law and statute, every exception and plea (defensioni), 
real and personal, of law and statute, which on our part could be opposed 
to this instrument or deed. And we and our heirs will for ever war- 
rant, secure (acquietabimus), and defend the aforesaid ten marks yearly 
to the aforesaid monks against all men and women. In testimony 
of which we have caused the present writ to be fortified with our seal. 
And because of the absence of the Lord Bishop of Aberdeen, William, 
Lord Bishop of St. Andrews, has at our request affixed his seal to this 
writ. These being the witnesses : William, by the grace of God, Lord 
Bishop of St. Andrews ; Andrew, Lord Abbot of Cupar ; Sirs William 
de Montealto, William Cumyn, Fergus Cumyn, John Wyschard, 
Gilbert Scot, knights ; Waldeve, rector of the church of Fovern ; 
Robert de Leth, rector of the church of Slanys ; Richard, rector of the 
church of Essy ; and Roger Paternoster, our clerks ; Duncan, judge ; 
David, son of Kyneth of Neuticbyr ; and many others. 

cxxv 

De Multura de Kynard. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Agnes de Arroch priorissa de Elyoch et eiusdem loci con- 
uentus, salutem in domino sempiternam. Nouerit vniuersitas 



DISPUTE AS TO MULTURE 159 

vestra quod cum auctoritate apostolica coram discrete viro 
domino N. Abbate de Dunfermelyn, vnico judice delegate, 
eiusque commissario, decano scilicet christianitatis de Abirden 
et Magistro Scolarum eiusdem loci, mota esset controuersia 
inter religiosos viros dominos N. abbatem et conuentum de 
Lundors actores, ex parte vna, et nos reas ex altera, super 
multura terre nostre de Kynhard soluenda, et secta facienda 
molendino dictorum abbatis et conuentus tanquam molendino 
syre de Lundors, quod est ipsorum abbatis et conuentus ex 
donacione inclite recordacionis comitis Dauid, nobis quia ex 
parte dictorum Abbatis et conuentus esset editum sub hac 
forma. Dicunt et proponunt in iure coram vobis, Domine N. 
magister scolarum Abirden, Commissari Domini N. abbatis 
de Dunfermelyn, vnici iudicis a sede apostolica delegati, abbas 
et conuentus monasterii de Lundors contra priorissam et con- 
uentum de Elyoch quod cum felicis recordacionis nobilis vir 
comes Dauid, pro salute anime sue et predecessorum et suc- 
cessorum suorum, molendinum de Lundors cum tota secta sua 
et multura eisdem et monasterio suo dedisset et concessisset, 
in puram et perpetuam elemosinam, de cuius secta molendini 
villa de Kynhard extitit et existit, iidem priorissa et conuentus, 
sectam et multuram eiusdem ville ad predictum molendinum 
spectantes, subtrahentes homines qui ad predictam sectam 
tenentur ne ad predictum molendinum accedant, sicut tenentur 
et consueuerunt, presumunt et diucius presumpserunt contra 
iusticiam impedire, in eorum abbatis et conuentus preiudicium 
et grauamen non modicum vnde dictos abbatem et conuentum 
predictis secta et multura iam per triginta et quatuor annos 
elapsos defraudarunt. Quare petunt dicti abbas et conuentus 
dictas priorissam et conuentum a predicto impedimento 
coherceri, et predictos homines ad predictam sectam faciendam 
auctoritate apostolica compelli. Petunt eciam dicti abbas et 
conuentus arreragia multure prouenientis ex dicta secta sibi 
cum integritate reddi, qui estimant valere centum et viginti 
mercas sterlingorum. Hec dicunt et petunt dicti abbas et 
conuentus, saluo sibi iuris beneficio in omnibus addendi, 
minuendi, mutandi, et omnia alia faciendi que sibi poterunt 
prodesse et parti aduerse obesse, protestantes se velle petere 
expensas in lite factas et de cetero faciendas. Tandem 



160 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

maiores persone conuentus nostre pro nostra contumacia a 
predictis iudicibus ab ingressu ecclesie suspense, lesamque in 
hac parte habentes conscienciam, liti pocius cedere quam 
contendere existimauimus. Vnde cum prefatis monachis super 
prefatis secta et multura de Kynhard conuenimus in hunc 
modum, videlicet, quod quamdiu contigerit nos non habere 
proprium molendinum infra dictam terrain nostram de Kyn- 
hard constructum, firmarii nostri de eadem terra seu homines 
nostri in ipsa manentes, uel quicunque alii ipsam terrain 
colentes, quocunque nomine censeantur, facient sectam, et 
multuram debitam soluent molendino dictorum abbatis et 
conuentus. Postquam autem molendinum infra limites dicte 
[foi. 87.] terre nostre de Kyn hard construxerimus, ad quod constru- 
endum dicti Abbas et conuentus nobis plenariam licenciam 
dederunt, a die ipsius molendini totaliter constructi solvemus 
singulis annis prefatis abbati et conventui per nos, vel per 
manus firmariorum nostrorum, seu quorumcunque aliorum 
dictam terram de Kynhard colencium pro dictis secta et 
multura tres marcas argenti ad duos terminos anni, videlicet, 
viginti solidos ad penthecosten et alios viginti solidos ad 
festum Sancti Martini in hyeme ; Ita quod si infra octo dies 
cujuscunque termini de porcione ejusdem termini non fuerit 
eisdem abbati et conventui satisfactum, liceat eisdem ex tune 
namos nostros et firmariorum hominumque nostrorum in dicta 
terra manencium, nullius requisite consensu, nee ab aliquo 
aliqua petita licencia, capere et tarn diu nulli replegiandos, nee 
ad vadium dandos, neque aliquo alio modo liberandos, detinere 
quousque eisdem abbati et conventui de porcione suo termino 
non soluta plenarie fuerit satisfactum. Ut autem ista convencio 
firma sit et stabilis inperpetuum, Nicholaus dei gratia tune 
abbas de Lundors pro se et conventu suo et successoribus suis, 
et ego prefata Agnes priorissa de Elyoch pro me et conventu 
mea et nobis succedentibus ad premissa omnia fideliter et sine 
diminucione futuris temporibus observanda invicem affidavimus. 
Si vero contigerit, quod absit, nos moniales vol nobis succedentes 
vel aliquem nomine nostro vel ecclesie nostre in aliquo tempore 
contra prefatam convencionem aliquod attemptare in pre- 
judicium dictorum abbatis et conventus, volumus quod dicta 
controversia, jam sedata, sit in eodem statu quo fuit die hujus 




FOL. 86 verso (NO. CXXV) 



DISPUTE AS TO MULTURE 161 

convencionis, ita tamen quod non audiamur in judicio nee 
aliqua fides dictis nostris vel procuratoris nostri adhibeatur 
donee de centum et viginti marcis in dicta edicione petitis 
racione arreragiorum dictarum secte et multure non solutarum, 
nee non de dampnis et expensis, que vel quas dicti abbas et 
conventus incurrerint aut fecerint, occasione dicte conven- 
cionis non observate, super quibus simplici eorum verbo vel 
procuratoris sui credi volumus, ipsis abbati et conventui integre 
et totaliter satisfecerimus. In cujus rei testimonium uni 
parti istius scripti in modum cirograffi confecti, resident! penes 
prefatos abbatem et conventum, sigilla venerabilis patris 
domini Willelmi dei gracia Episcopi Sancti Andree et predict! 
abbatis de Dunfermelyn una cum com muni sigillo capituli 
nostri sunt appensa, Alteri vero parti penes nos remanenti 
commune sigillum capituli monasterii de Lundors est apposi- 
tum. Datum apud Lundors, die conversions Sancti Pauli 
apostoli, anno domini milesimo ducentesimo octogesimo 

primo. 

OF the MULTURE of KYNARD. 

To all Christ's faithful who shall see or hear this writ Agnes of Arroch, 
Prioress of Elyoch [Elcho], and the convent of the same place, health 
everlasting in the Lord. Let all of you know that a question was raised 
in debate before the discreet man, N., Lord Abbot of Dunfermline, sole 
judge delegate by apostolic authority, and his commissary, namely, the 
Dean of Christianity, of Aberdeen, and master of the schools of the 
same place, between the religious men [the monks], N., Lord Abbot and 
the convent of Lundors, pursuers, of the one part, and us, defenders, of 
the other part, on the multure to be paid from our land of Kynhard, 
and on the suit to be made to the mill of the said abbot and convent, as 
if to the mill of the shire of Lundors, which belonged to the said abbot 
and convent of the gift of Earl David, of famous memory. And on the 
part of the said abbot and convent the ground of action was put forth to 
us in the following terms : ' The Abbot and Convent of the monastery of 
Lundors state and declare in legal process (in jure) before you, Sir, 
(domine) N., master of the schools of Aberdeen, commissary of N., Lord 
Abbot of Dunfermline, sole judge delegated by the Apostolic See, 
against the Prioress and Convent of Elyoch that the noble man, of 
happy memory, Earl David, for the weal of his soul and of his predecessors 
and successors, gave and granted in pure and perpetual alms, to the 
same [monks] and their monastery the mill of Lundors withall its suit 
and multure ; to the suit of which mill the vill of Kynhard belonged 
and belongs. But the same prioress and convent presume, and have 
long presumed, to hinder the multure and suit pertaining to the mill 

L 



162 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

from the same vill [of Kynhard] by withdrawing the men who are bound 
to the aforesaid suit, so that they should not come to the aforesaid mill, 
to the prejudice and no small grievance of the abbot and convent. 
Whence it has come to pass that they have defrauded the said abbot and 
convent of the aforesaid suit and multure now for thirty and four 
years past. Wherefore the said abbot and convent seek that the said 
prioress and convent should be restrained from causing this hindrance, 
and that the men aforesaid should be compelled by apostolic authority 
to make the aforesaid suit. The said abbot and convent also seek 
the arrears of multure arising from the aforesaid suit to be paid to 
them in full ; and they estimate those arrears at the value of one 
hundred and twenty marks sterling. These things the said abbot and 
convent allege and seek, reserving to themselves in all things the benefit 
of law to add to, take from, and change, and to do all other things 
which can be of advantage to them, and of disadvantage to the opposite 
party, declaring that they wish to seek the costs incurred or hereafter to 
be incurred in litigation.' 

At length the higher members (majores persons) of our convent were 
suspended by the aforesaid judges from entering the church; and, 
having a wounded conscience in regard to this, we have thought it 
better to retire from the litigation than to further contest the matter. 
Wherefore we came to an agreement with the aforesaid monks upon the 
aforesaid suit and multure of Kynhard in this manner, to wit, that so 
long as it happened that we have no mill of our own built within our own 
land of Kynhard, the farmers of our said land, or our men residing in it, 
or any others, whosoever, that cultivate that land, under whatever name 
they are reckoned, shall make suit and pay due multure to the mill of 
the said abbot and convent. But after we shall have constructed a mill 
within the bounds of our said land of Kynhard, for the construction of 
which the said abbot and convent have given full permission, we shall, 
from the day on which the mill has been completed, pay every year to 
the said abbot and convent, in lieu of the said suit and multure, three 
marks of silver, at the two terms of the year, namely, twenty shillings 
at Whitsunday and the other twenty shillings at the feast of St. Martin 
in winter, by our own hands, or those of our farmers, or of the others, 
whoever they may be, who cultivate the said land of Kynhard. So that 
if within eight days after each term the abbot and convent shall not have 
been satisfied for the portion due at that term, it shall be lawful for them 
thereupon to take poinds from us and our farmers and our men residing 
in the said land, the consent of none being required, nor leave sought 
from any. And they may keep these poinds which shall not be re- 
pledged by any, nor given at wad, nor in any wise delivered to any, 
until the abbot and convent shall have been fully satisfied for the portion 
not paid at the term at which it was due. 

And that this agreement may be firm and established for ever, 
Nicholas, by the grace of God then Abbot of Lundors, for himself, and 



GRANT BY ROBERT I. 163 

his convent, and his successors, and I, the aforesaid Agnes, Prioress of 
Elyoch, for myself and my convent and those who shall succeed us, have 
given our mutual faith to observe all the premises faithfully and without 
diminution in time to come. But if it shall happen, which God forbid, 
that we, the nuns, or those who succeed us, or any one in our name, or 
in the name of our church, shall at any time attempt anything contrary 
to the aforesaid agreement to the prejudice of the said abbot and 
convent, we will that the said question in dispute [between the monks 
and us] now settled should be regarded as in the same state in which it 
was on the day when this agreement was made, yet in such wise that we 
may not be heard in judgment, nor any credence be given to our words 
or the words of our proctor, until we shall have fully and completely 
satisfied the abbot and convent for the hundred and twenty marks 
claimed in the said formal charge (editione) on the ground of arrears of 
the said suit and multure not yet paid, and also shall have satisfied for 
the damages and costs which the said abbot and convent shall have 
incurred or expended by reason of this agreement not having been 
observed, with regard to which [damages and costs] we will that credence 
should be given to their bare word, or to the word of their proctor. 

In testimony of which thing the seals of the venerable father, William, 
by the grace of God Lord Bishop of St. Andrews, and of the aforesaid 
Abbot of Dunfermline, together with the common seal of our chapter, 
have been appended to that part of this writ, executed in the manner of 
an indenture, which remains in the possession of the aforesaid abbot and 
convent. To the other part, remaining in our possession, the common 
seal of the chapter of the monastery of Lundors is affixed. 

Given at Lundors, on the day of the Conversion of St. Paul the Apostle 
[Jan. 25], in the year of our Lord MCCLXXXI. 



CXXVI 
De Kynmuk, de Balbuthan, et de Hathirwych. 

ROBERTVS del gracia Rex Scottorum Omnibus probis homini- 
bus tocius terre sue, clericis et laicis, Salutem. Sciatis nos pro 
salute anime nostre et pro salute animarum omnium anteces- 
sorum et successorum nostrorum, regum Scocie, dedisse, conces- 
sisse, et hac present! carta nostra confirmasse deo, et beate 
Marie Virgini, Sancto Andree, et Monasterio de Lundors, [/*/. 88.] 
Religiosis viris Abbati et monachis ibidem deo servientibus et 
inperpetuum servituris, terras de Kynmuk, de Balbuthan, et de 
Hathirwych cum multuris earumdem terrarum in escambium 
terre de Bernes in le Garviauch, quam dicti religiosi habuerunt 
ex dono et infeodacione Dilecti fratris nostri, domini edwardi 



164 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

de Brus; Tenendas et habendas dictis monacbis et eorum 
successoribus in perpetuum per omnes rectas metas et divisas 
suas, in bosco et piano, pratis, pascuis et pasturis, viis, semitis, 
moris, maresiis, aquis, stangnis, vivariis, et multuris, in aucupa- 
cionibus et venacionibus, et cum omnibus aliis libertatibus, 
comoditatibus, aisiamentis, consuetudinibus, et ceteris perti- 
nenciis ad dictam terrain spectantibus, seu alio modo spectare 
valentibus in futurum, in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosi- 
nam, adeo libere et quiete, pacifice, integre, et honorifice, cum 
omnibus libertatibus et comoditatibus suis, tarn non nominatis 
quam nominatis, sicut aliqua terra alicui monasterio seu pio 
loco per nos aut predecessores nostros infra regnum nostrum 
Scocie in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam data, et 
concessa liberius, quiecius, plenius, aut honorificencius tenetur 
aut possidetur, ita quod de dictis terris cum pertinenciis aut de 
monachis supradictis uel eorum hominibus dictas terras 
inhabitantibus nichil omnino exigi aut demandari poterit in 
futurum preter oracionum tantummodo suffragia deuotarum. 
In cuius. 

OP KYNMUK, of BALBUTHAN, and of HATHIRWYCH. 

ROBERT [i.], by the grace of God, King of Scots, to all good men of his 
whole land, clerical and lay, greeting. Know ye that we, for the weal 
of our soul and for the weal of the souls of all our ancestors and 
successors, Kings of Scotland, have given, granted, and by this our 
present charter confirmed, to God, the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Andrew, 
and the Monastery of Lundors, the religious men, the abbot and monks, 
who serve or shall for ever serve God there, the lands of Kynmuk, of 
Balbuthan, and of Hathirwych, with the multure of the same lands, in 
exchange for the land of Bernes in the Garviauch (in le Garviauch), which 
the said religious had of the gift and infeftment (infeodacione) of our beloved 
brother, Sir Edward de Brus ; to be held and had by the said monks and 
their successors, by all their right meiths and marches, in wood and 
plain, meadows, pastures, and grazings, roads, paths, moors, marshes, 
waters, stauks, live-pools, and multures, in hawkings and huntings, and 
with all other liberties, conveniences, easements, customs, and other 
pertinents which belong to the said land or can in any wise belong to 
it in the future, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, as freely and 
quietly, peaceably, fully and honourably, with all their liberties and 
conveniences, as well unnamed as named, as any land, given and 
granted in free, pure, and perpetual alms, by us or our predecessors to 
any monastery or place of piety (pio loco) within our realm of Scotland, 
is most freely, quietly, fully, and honourably held and possessed, so that 



GRANT OF THE CHURCH OF MUTHIL 165 

in future nothing whatsoever can be exacted or demanded from the said 
lauds with their pertinents, or from the monks aforesaid, or their men, 
save only the suffrages of devout prayers. In [testimony] of which. 

CXXVII 
[De ecclesia de Moethel.] 

VNIVERSIS Sancte Matris ecclesie filiis et fidelibus Malis filius 
comitis Ferteht, salutem. Sciant tarn presentes quam futuri 
me dedisse et concessisse et hac carta mea confirmasse deo et 
ecclesie Sancte Marie et Sancti Andree de Lundors, et monachis 
ibidem deo seruientibus, In puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
ecclesiam de Moethel cum terra ad eandem ecclesiam perti- 
nente, cum decimis et obuencionibus, et omnibus ad eandem 
ecclesiam iuste pertinentibus. Quare volo ut predicti monachi 
prenominatam ecclesiam liberam et quietam ab omni seruicio 
et seculari exaccione teneant et possideant, ita libere et quiete 
et plenarie et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia in regno Scocie 
aliquam ecclesiam liberius, quiecius, plenarius, et honorificencius 
tenet et possidet. Hiis testibus, Henrico abbate de Aber- 
brothoc, Johanne archidiacono de Dumblane, et ceteris. 

(Abftract) 

[Or the CHURCH of MOETHEL. J 1 

To all the sons of Holy Mother Church and the faithful, Malise, son 
of Earl Ferteht, greeting. He gives, grants, and confirms to Lundors, 
in pure and perpetual alms, the church of Moethel with its land, tithes, 
oblations, and all other pertinents, to be held free and quit of all service 
and secular exaction, as freely as any abbey in Scotland holds any 
church. Witnesses, Henry, Abbot of Aberbrothoc ; John, Archdeacon 
of Dunblane, and others. 

CXXVIII 

De una marca quam dedit nobis Radulphus de [/*/. 

Lascellis. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Radulphus de Lascellis, miles, eternam in domino salutem. 
Nouerit vniuersitas vestra, me pro salute anime domini quon- 
dam Alexandri comyn, comitis de Buchan, domini mei, et 

1 No title in MS. 



166 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

heredum suorum, necnon pro salute anime mee et anime 
quondam matildis sponse mee, et animarum omnium anteces- 
sorum et successorum meorum dedisse, concessisse, et hac pre- 
sent! carta mea confirmasse, Religiosis viris Abbati et conuentui 
de Lundors vnam marcam argenti ad sustentacionem duorum 
cereorum coram magno altari in Monasterio suo ardencium ad 
omnes missas, vesperas, et matutinas que de beata virgine Maria 
celebrantur in dicto monasterio, et in omnibus festis que 
sint in cappis. Volo eciam et concedo quod dicti abbas et 
conuentus et eorum successores percipiant dictam marcam 
singulis annis de terra mea de Huchannane Locherton, quam 
teneo de comite de Buchan, per manus meas vel firmarii mei 
de dicta terra quicunque fuerit, vel per manus heredum meorum 
ad vnum terminum anni, Scilicet, ad pentecosten, pro qua 
quidem marca singulis annis in perpetuum percipienda, vt 
dictum est, dicti Abbas et conuentus sustentacionem dictorum 
duorum cereorum in se susceperint, et ad hoc fideliter faciendum 
dicti Abbas et conuentus se et successores suos, et ego me et 
heredes meos per hoc scriptum firmiter obligamus, ita videlicet 
quod liceat eisdem Abbati et conuentui namos meos vel 
heredum meorum sine successorum meorum vel firmarii nostri, 
si firmarium habuerimus, nee non et omnia mea vel heredum 
meorum bona siue successorum meorum vel firmarii nostri, vt 
dictum est, in dicta terra inuenta capere, et si in solucione dicte 
marce statuto termino defecerimus, tarn diu nulli replegianda 
detinere, donee dicta marca eisdem plenarie fuerit satisfacta 
vna cum arreragiis, si que fuerint. Ego vero et heredes mei 
nunquam aliquo modo dictam terram alienabimus nisi salva 
dictis Abbati et conuentui marca predicta. Si vero contingat, 
quod absit, quod dicti Abbas et conuentus aliquo tempore 
dictos duos cereos sustentare recusauerint, ex tune liceat michi 
et heredibus meis dictam marcam tarn diu detinere donee ipsi 
ad sustentacionem eorum redire voluerint. In cuius rei testi- 
monium istud scriptum in modo cirograffi est confectum, cuius 
vna pars signata sigillo meo penes dictos Abbatem et conuen- 
tum residet. Altera vero pars signata communi sigillo conuentus 
penes me residet. Datum apud Lundors, die iovis proxima 
festum Sancti Mathie apostoli, anno gracie Millesimo CC. 
nonogesimo. 



GRANT BY RALPH DE LASCELLIS 167 

(Abstract) 
1 OF one MARK which RALPH DE LASCELLIS gave us. ' 

To all Christ's faithful, etc., Ralph de Lascellis, knight, etc. For the 
weal of the soul of the late Sir Alexander Corny n, Earl of Buchan, 
e my lord,' and his heirs, ' and for the weal of my soul and for the soul 
of the late Matilda, my spouse, and for the souls of all my ancestors and 
successors,' he grants to Lundors one mark of silver for sustaining two 
wax tapers before the great altar in the monastery, tG be lighted at all 
masses, vespers, and matins of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and on all 
festivals when copes are worn. The mark is to be received every year 
from his land of Huchannane Locherton, which he held of the Earl of 
Buchan, by his hands or the hands of the farmers of the said land, or by 
the hands of his heirs, at the term of Whitsunday. The abbot and con- 
vent take on themselves in return for the one mark to maintain the two 
wax tapers. The abbot and convent shall have the right, in the event of 
the mark not being duly paid, to take poinds from him, or his heirs, or 
the farmer of the said land, if there be a farmer, and to seize all the 
goods of him, his heirs, or his farmer, which might be found on the said 
land, and to detain them, without repledging them to any, until the 
payment of the mark, and of arrears, if any, shall have been fully made. 
For himself and his heirs he engages not to alienate the land in any way 
without securing the mark to Lundors. If the abbot and convent at 
any time refuse, which God forbid, to maintain the two wax tapers, it 
shall be lawful for him and his heirs to retain the mark until the monks 
will revert to fulfilling the engagement. 

The writ was executed in the form of an indenture, of which one part, 
sealed with his seal, remained in the possession of the abbot and convent, 
and the other part, sealed with the common seal of the convent, remained 
with him. Given at Lundors on Thursday next after the feast of St. 
Mathias the Apostle [Feb. 24], MCCXC. 



CXXIX 
De flandres. 

SCIANT presentes et futuri, quod Ego Hugo Brito recepi de 
comite Dauid fratre Regis Scocie, per escambium de coninton 
cum pertinenciis, Terram que fuit Gillandres Buch in Garuiach, 
et ibidem dimidiam carucatam terre in flandres, et septem 
acras terre, propter 1 loenig et drocion, et terram quam 
abraham marus et eyncus tenuerunt, et quietum clamaui, de 

1 So the MS. seems to read. The conjectural reading * prope terras ' is offered 
as a possible emendation. But see Notes and Illustrations. 



168 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

me et heredibus meis, predicto comiti Dauid et heredibus suis 
totum ius et clamium quod ego vel successores mei unquam 
habuimus, vel quod successores mei unquam habere poterint in 
predicta terra de coninton cum pertinenciis suis, pro pre- 
dictis escambiis, et id iuraui et affidaui eis tenendum pro me 
et heredibus meis, cofam Willelmo Rege Scocie, in manu 
Dauid de Lindesey, tune Justiciarii Regis Scotorum, et quod 
quandocunque idem comes Dauid per consilium hominum 
suorum a me exegerit securitatem, inde ei faciam in Anglia. 
Hiis testibus, Galtero olifard, Dauid de Lindesey, Henrico de 
Scocia et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
f Or FLANDRES.' 

HUGH BRITON makes known to all that he has received from Earl 
David, brother of the King of Scotland, by exchange of Coninton with 
its pertinents, the land which belonged to Gillandres Buch in Garviach, 
and in the same place a half ploughgate of land in Flandres, and seven 
acres of land ' on account (propter) of Loeinge and Drocion/ and the 
land which Abraham Mare 1 and Eyncus held. He quitclaims for ever 
to Earl David and his heirs all right and claim which he or his ancestors 
ever had, or which his successors ever could have, in the aforesaid land 
of Coninton with its pertinents. He swears and gives his faith to this 
effect before William, King of Scotland, 'in the hand of David de 
Lindesay, then justiciar of the King of Scots/ and engages that when- 
ever Earl David ( on the advice of his men ' shall require security from 
him [Briton] he will give it to him [Earl David] in England. Wit- 



[fol. 5.-] CXXX 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris, 
Reginaldus de Chen pater, salutem eternam in domino. Nouerit 
vniuersitas vestra me pro salute anime mee et antecessorum et 
successorum meorum resignasse et quietum clamasse abbati de 
Lundors et conuentui et eorum successoribus in perpetuum, de 
me et heredibus meis et omnibus successoribus meis, totum ius 
et clamium quod habui uel habere credidi in terra de Tholau- 
kery. Et quod nulla perambulacio fiat in perpetuum inter 
terrain meam de cremund et eorum terras de Tolaukeri et de 

1 Perhaps ' the mair.' See Notes and Illustrations. 



QUITCLAIM OF R. DE CHEN 169 

Doesblare, nee aliqua impetracio perambulacionis fiat ex parte 

nostra inter predictas terras ; Et quod nobis non ualeat si im- 

petratur. Quoniam totum ius et clamium quod habebamus in 

illis uel aliqua parte earum uel ulla a perambulacione procuranda a MS. //. 

illud eis dono et quiet um clamo inperpetuum. In cuius rei 

testimonium presenti scripto sigillum meum vna cum sigillo 

domini Reginaldi filii et heredis mei est appositum. Datum De thoiaukery 

apud sconam, die iouis proxima post festum Sancti Jobannis 



ante portam latinam, anno grade millesimo ducentesimo Ktquodnuiia 

perambulacio 

septuagesimo octauo. fiat inter. 

(Abstract) 
[Op the LAND of THOLAUKERY. ] l 

REGINALD DE CHEN, senior (pater), for the weal of his soul, and for 
the souls of his ancestors and successors resigns and quitclaims to 
Lundors, for himself, his heirs, and successors, all right and claim 
which he had, or believed that he had, in the land of Thoiaukery. He 
engages that in future there shall be no perambulation between his 
land of Cremund and the monks' lands of Thoiaukery and of Doesblare, 
and that no demand for a perambulation between the aforesaid lands 
shall be made on his part ; and that if such demand be made it shall be 
of no avail. Inasmuch as he gave and quitclaimed for ever all right and 
claim which he had in those lands or in any part of them, or in what 
might be obtained by any perambulation. In testimony the writ is 
sealed with his seal, and the seal of Reginald, his son and heir. Given 
at Scone on the Thursday next after the feast of St. John before the 
Latin Gate [May 6], MCCLXXVIII. 



CXXXI 

Carta ecclesie de Cullessy. 

OMNIBVS presens scriptum visuris vel audituris Rogerus de 
Quency Comes Wyntone, Constabularius Scocie, eternam in 
domino salutem. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra nos caritatis 
intuitu, et pro salute anime nostre et pro animabus anteces- 
sorum et successorum nostrorum,dedisse, concessisse et presenti 
carta nostra confirmasse deo et beate marie et ecclesie sancti 
andree de Lundors et abbati et conventui ibidem deo ser- 
vientibus et in perpetuum servituris Ecclesiam de Culessin, 



1 No title in MS. 



170 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

cum omnibus suis pertinenciis ; Habendam et tenendam dicto 
abbati et conventui, et eorum successoribus, in liberam, puram 
et perpetuam elemosinam, libere, quiete, bene, et in pace in 
perpetuum ; Sicut aliqua ecclesia melius, liberius, et quiecius 
in Regno Scocie dari poterit et concedi, videlicet, quod cedente 
vel decedente magistro Adam de Malcarreston Rectore dicte 
ecclesie, liceat predictis abbati et conuentui et eorum succes- 
soribus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, in dictam ecclesiam 
pacifice intrare et possidere et in vsus proprios conuertere, si 
eandem in vsus proprios aliquatenus possint impetrare. Et si 
eandem ecclesiam in vsus proprios conuertendam possint im- 
petrare et optinere, nos vel heredes nostri nichil juris seu 
clamium in dicta ecclesia de cetero exigemus seu vendicabimus, 
nee contra suam impetracionem in aliquo veniemus. Et nos 
et heredes nostri dictam donacionem, concessionem, et con- 
firmacionem dicte ecclesie de Culessyn cum omnibus suis 
pertinenciis, vt prenominatum est, dictis abbati et conuentui 
et eorum successoribus contra omnes gentes in perpetuum 
warantizabimus. Set si dictam ecclesiam in vsus proprios 
conuertendam non possint inpetrare, jus aduocacionis in dicta 
ecclesia ad nos et heredes nostros expresse et sine alicuius con- 
tradiccione reuertetur. In cuius rei testimonium et securi- 
tatem presentem cartam sigilli nostri impressione duximus | 
\jol. 6.] Roborandam. Hiis testibus, Dominis Willelmo de Oyly, 
Johanne becard, militibus, Magistro Adam de Malcarreston, 
Magistro Eustacio de Scelford, domino Ricardo de Radeswelle, 
Magistro Roberto tune phisico nostro, domino Willelmo de 
Sancto Edwardo capellano, Saero de Setun, Rogero Raboc, 
Alexandro de Seton, Rogero Bourc clerico, et aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' CHARTER of the CHURCH of CULLESSY.' 

ROGER DE QUENCY, Earl of Wyntone, Constable of Scotland, for the 
weal of his soul, and for the souls of his ancestors and successors gives, 
grants, and confirms to Lundors the church of Culessin with all its 
pertinents, to be held in free, pure, and perpetual alms, as freely as any 
church in the kingdom of Scotland can be given and granted, to wit, 
that on the death or resignation of Master Adam de Malcarreston, rector 
of the said church, it shall be lawful for the abbot and convent to enter 
the said church, to possess it, and convert it to their own uses, if they 



THE CHURCH OF COLLESSIE 171 

are able to obtain it to any extent for their own uses. 1 If they are able 
to convert the church to their own uses, he and his heirs will raise no 
obstacle grounded on any right or claim. This gift, grant, and con- 
firmation of the church of Culessyn to the monks of Lundors he and his 
heirs will warrant for ever * against all people' (contra omnes gentes). 
But if the monks are not able to secure the church for conversion to 
their own uses, the right of advowson (jus advocationis) is to revert to him 
and his heirs. De Quency 's seal. Witnesses . . . 

CXXXII 
De confirmacione regis Alexandri. 

ALEXANDER del gracia Rex Scottorum, Omnibus probis 
hominibus tocius terre sue, Salutem. Sciatis nos concessisse 
et hac present! carta nostra confirmasse Donacionem illam 
quam Rogerus de Quency Comes Wintoun, Constabularius 
Scocie, fecit caritatis intuitu, pro salute anime sue et pro 
animabus antecessorum et successorum suorum, deo et beate 
Marie et ecclesie sancti Andree de Lundors et abbati et 
conuentui ibidem deo seruientibus et in perpetuum seruituris, 
de ecclesia de Cullessin, cum omnibus suis pertinenciis ; 
Tenenda et habenda eisdem abbati et conuentui et eorum 
successoribus in perpetuum in liberam, puram, et perpetuam 
elemosinam, adeo libere, quiete, plenarie et honorifice, sicut 
carta dicti Comitis eis inde confecta plenius iuste testatur. 
Testibus, Gamelino episcopo sancti Andree, Ricardo episcopo 
Dunkeldensi, Roberto episcopo Dunblanensi, Willelmo Comite 
de Marre Camerario, Johanne Cumyn, Hugone de Abirnethin, 
Hugone de Berklay Justiciario Laodonie, Johanne de Lam- 
berton, apud Linlithgov, vicesimo quinto die decembris, anno 
regni nostri Quintodecimo. 

(Abstract) 
'Op KING ALEXANDER'S CONFIRMATION.' 

ALEXANDER, King of Scots, confirms that gift which Roger de Quency, 
Earl of Wintoun, Constable of Scotland, made to Lundors at the prompt- 
ing of charity, for the weal of his soul and for the souls of his ancestors 
and successors, of the church of Cullessin with all its pertinents, to be 
held and had ... as the charter of the said earl more fully testifies. 

1 The bishop of the diocese had the right to refuse his assent, and without 
such assent the transfer was invalid. 



172 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Witnesses ... At Linlithgow, the 25th of December, in the fifteenth 
year of our reign. 1 

CXXXIII 

De amicabili composicione inter Abraham Episco- 
pum Dunblanensem et Guidonem abbatem [de 
Lundors]. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris. 
Johannes de Mubray, miles, dominus de Methfen, salutem 
eternam in Domino. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra quod cum 
predecessores mei, pro salute animarum suarum et suorum 
successorum, dederunt, concesserunt et per cartas suas specialiter 
confirmaverunt deo et ecclesie Dunblanensi terrain de Eglis- 
magril cum pertinenciis suis ; Ac ipsa terra de Eglismagril per 
amicabilem composicionem inter dominum quondam Abraham 
episcopum Dunblanensem nomine ecclesie sue, et dominum 

MS. de de. Guidonem quondam abbatem de a Lundors et conuentum suum 
nomine monasterij sui super ecclesia de Mothel, ex arbitrio 
domini Willelmi sancti an dree episcopi, ad ipsos abbatem et 
conuentum de Lundors et suos successores fuerit deuoluta, et 
in processu temporis dictam terram de Eglismagril ecclesie pre- 
dicte Dunblanensi a predictis collatam, pro salute anime mee 
et predictorum omnium, liberam et quietam ab omni auxilio, 
exercitu, et forinseco seruicio, per cartam meam specialiter de 
gracia mea eidem ecclesie concessero et confirmauero : Volo et 
[fol. 7.] concedo pro me et heredi | bus meis et meis successoribus, quod 
dicti abbas et conuentus teneant et possideant predictam 
terram de Eglismagril, cum pertinenciis suis, in liberam, puram, 
et perpetuam elemosinam, liberam et quietam ab omni secta 
cuiuscunque curie, exactione, citacione, recognicione, nama- 
cione, et omnimodo exercitu, omnique genere auxilii vel seculari 
demanda facienda uel prestanda, necnon et ab omni forinseco 
seruicio, onere et seruitute, quocunque casu uel causa con- 
tingente, quorum omnium onus in me et heredes meos ac meos 

b MS. suscepio. successores de cetero suscipio, 5 promittentes fideliter pro me et 

1 The names of the bishops which appear among the witnesses, as well as 
other evidence, show that the charter is by Alexander ill., the fifteenth year of 
whose reign was completed 7th July 1264. The date of the charter is accord- 
ingly 25th December 1263. 



LANDS OF EGLISMAGRIL 173 

heredibus ac successoribus meis quod nunquam grauamen, 
molestiam, uel inquietudinem super dicta terra, occasione pre- 
missorum uel alicuius de premissis, prefatis abbati et conuentui 
futuris temporibus inferemus, a nee districcionem aliquam per a MS. inferea- 
capcionem bonorum in ipsa terra de Eglismagril existencium 
uel alio aliquo b modo super eisdem faciemus, neque fieri per- b MS. alico. 
mittemus nee ab aliis fieri procurabimus. In cuius rei testi- 
monium present! scripto sigillum meum apposui. Data apud 
Methfen, in festo Sancti Vincencii martiris, Anno gracie 

M C C C. 

(Abstract) 
' OF a FRIENDLY AGREEMENT between ABRAHAM, BISHOP of DUNBLANE, 

and GUIDO, ABBOT [of LUNDORS]. ' 

JOHN DE MUBRAY, knight, Lord of Methfen, makes known to all that 
his predecessors, for the weal of their own souls and the souls of their 
successors, had given and by their charters specially confirmed to the 
[cathedral] church of Dunblane the land of Eglismagril with its perti- 
nents. He further narrates that the said land had been made over to 
Lundors by a friendly agreement between Abraham, former Bishop of 
Dunblane, and Guido, former Abbot of Lundors, as to the church of 
Mothel, in consequence of the decree arbitral of William, Bishop of 
St. Andrews. He purposes, of his favour, to grant and confirm by 
charter to Lundors this land which had been conferred on the church 
of Dunblane by his predecessors for the weal of souls, and to grant that 
it should be free and quit of all aid, hosting {exercitu), and forinsec 
service. Wherefore he wills and concedes, for himself, his heirs, and 
his successors, that the monks of Lundors should hold and possess the 
land of Eglismagril with its pertinents in free, pure, and perpetual alms, 
quit of all suit of any court whatsoever, of exaction, citation, recognition, 
poinding (namacione), all hosting, all kinds of aids and secular demands, 
all forinsec service, burden, and subjection, which might arise by any 
chance or from any cause. The burden of all such he takes on himself, 
his heirs, and successors, and faithfully promises that neither he nor 
his heirs nor successors will in future give any trouble or annoyance 
to the monks of Lundors, nor make any distraint by the seizure of 
goods upon the land of Eglismagril, nor permit nor procure such to be 
made by others. His seal. ' Given at Methfen, on the feast of St. 
Vincent the Martyr [Jan. 22], in the year of grace MCCC.' 

CXXXIV 

[De sustentacione monachorum de Lundors.] 
DAVID dei gracia Rex Scottorum Thome de Carnoto militi, 
Cancellario nostro Scocie, salutem. Cum monasterium de 



174 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Lundors a predecessoribus nostris fundetur, et per quam plura 
guerrarum discrimina, pensiones intollerabiles, hecnon asseda- 
ciones terrarum per quosdam abbates ipsius monastery, non 
immerito dispositas quandoque concessas, in dampnum non 
modicum monastery eiusdem et lesionem elemosine nostre, ac in 
iacturam bonorum dicti monastery vehemencius debilitetur ; 
Ita quod redditus eiusdem monasterij ad sustentacionem mon- 
achorum ibidem seruiencium vix poterunt sufficere; Et quia 
vt intelleximus per bone memorie dominum, patrem nostrum, 
dudum Regem Scottorum et quondam Thomam Ranulphi 
Comitem Morauie, dilectum nepotem nostrum, tune locum 
nostrum tenentem, de consensu diocesani, videlicet, quondam 
Jacobi dei gracia tune Episcopi Sancti Andree, in cuius Episco- 
patu dictum monasterium situm est, et per plenum consilium 
in pleno parliamento, tento apud Sconam, omnia huiusmodi 
facta dictorum Abbatum reprobata, reuocata, et omnino de 
iure fuerunt adnihillata ; Nos omnes huiusmodi pensiones, 
donaciones, et assedaciones per quemcunque dictorum Abbatum 
vsque in diem confeccionis presencium, qualitercunque factas et 
concessas, reuocantes : vobis firmiter precipiendo mandamus 
[foi. 8.] quatinus probos viros religiosos | super hac reuocacione nostra 
vnam litteram magno sigillo nostro sigillatam, in debita forma 
capelle nostre confectam, Justiciary s, vicecomitibus, prepositis, 
et ceteris ministris nostris quibuscunque qui pro tempore 
fuerint, et quorum interest, visis presentibus, habere faciatis, vt 
ipsi predictos viros religiosos secundum propositum nostrum 
in premissis sustineant, manuteneant, et defendant. Datum 
apud monasterium de Kynlosse, vicesimo nono die marcij, anno 
regni nostri Tercio decimo. 

[Or the maintenance of the MONKS of LUNDORS.] 1 

DAVID, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to Thomas de Carnot, 
knight, our Chancellor of Scotland, greeting. Inasmuch as the monastery 
of Lundors was founded by our predecessors, and is exceedingly enfeebled 
both by the very many perils of the wars, unbearable pensions, and 
leases of the lands granted, not unjustly at the time, by certain abbots 
of that monastery to the no small damage of the monastery itself, 
and the hurt of our alms, and to the hazard of the property of the said 
monastery, so that the revenues of the same monastery can scarcely 

1 No title in MS. 



GRANT OF A RIGHT OF WAY 175 

suffice for the maintenance of the monks serving there ; and because, as 
we have understood, all acts of this kind done by the said abbots were 
rejected, revoked, and made wholly null in law, by our father of good 
memory, late King of Scots, and the late Thomas Randolph, Earl of 
Moray, our dear cousin, then holding our place, with the consent of the 
diocesan, to wit, the late James, by the grace of God then Bishop of 
St. Andrews, in whose bishopric the said monastery is situated, and by 
the full council in full parliament held at Scone; we revoking all 
pensions, gifts, and leases of this kind by whomsoever of the said abbots, 
or howsoever made and granted up to the day of the making of these 
presents, strictly command and enjoin that you on sight of these presents 
should cause the good men, the monks, to have a letter upon this our 
revocation, sealed with our Great Seal in the due form of our chapel, 
addressed to the justiciars, sheriffs, provosts, and other officers of ours, 
whosoever they may be for the time, and to whom it is of concern, and 
that they in accordance with our purpose in the premises should support, 
aid, and defend the religious aforesaid. Given at the monastery of 
Kynlosse, the twenty-ninth day of March, in the thirteenth year of our 



cxxxv 

Liberum chymnachium per totam terrain Domini 
R. de Quincy. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus presens scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Rogerus de Quency Comes Wynton et constabularius Scocie, 
Salutem in domino. Noueritis nos diuine caritatis intuitu 
dedisse, concessisse, et hac presenti carta nostra confirmasse 
deo et Monachis de Lundors vt tarn ipsi quam eorum homines 
cum suis bobus, equis, et carris liberum Cheminagium habeant 
per medium Boscum nostrum de Kyndelohc, si sibi viderint 
expedire, Et per totam terram nostram ubi melius et pro- 
prius sibi visum fuerit, usque ad moram de Edyn pro Bruera, et 
per ipsam moram mediam usque ad pethariam que 2 Monagrey 
pro Pethys, Ac abinde ad Monasterium suum eundo et 
redeundo, Sine impedimento vel contradiccione alicujus 
ballivi nostri vel heredum seu successorum nostrorum inper- 
petuum. Nos vero et heredes nostri predictis monachis 
et eorum successoribus predictum Chiminagium, sicut supra 
scriptum est, contra omnes gentes et feminas inperpetuum 
warendizabimus et defendemus. In cujus rei testimonium 

1 I34 2 ' ' Something is here omitted, such as 'dicitur.' 



176 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

presens scriptum sigilli nostri munimine roboravimus. Hiis 
testibus, Magistro W. Wyscard Archidiacono Sancti Andree, 
tune Cancellario Scocie, Magistro A. de Malcarueston pre- 
posito Sancti Andree, Dominis Willelmo de Holy, Johanne 
Bekard, Roberto de Sancto Andrea, Malcolmo Butyler, Hugone 
de Bevmys et Rogero de Forfar, militibus. Willelmo capellano 
nostro, domino Ricardo de Redwelle clerico, et Magistro 
Roberto medico nostro, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
e FREE ROAD through the whole land of SIR R. DE QUINCY. ' 

ROGER DE QUENCY, Earl of Wynton, and Constable of Scotland, at the 
prompting of divine love, gives, grants, and confirms by the present 
charter to God and the monks of Lundors, that they and their men 
with their oxen, horses, and carts should have a free road (cheminagium) 
through the middle of his wood of Kyndeloch, if they think it an ad- 
vantage to them, and through the whole of his land, wherever it might 
seem to them best and most suitable, as far as to the moor of Edyn for 
heather ; and through the middle of the moor itself as far as the peat- 
moss, which is called Monagrey, for peats, and thence to the monastery, 
both going and returning, without hindrance or opposition from his 
bailiff, or the bailiff of his heirs and successors. He and his heirs will 
warrant and defend to the monks and their successors the aforesaid 
right of way against all people and women (contra omnesgentes etfeminas). 
Seal of De Quincy. Witnesses . . . 



CXXXVI 

Carta Elene de Brechyn de loco concesso pro petis 
9.} Abbatis | de ij porciunculis terre de Kyndloch. 

VNIVERSIS Christi fidelibus presentes literas visuris vel audi- 
turis, Elena relicta quondam dornini Willelmi de Brechin, 
domina de Kyndeloch, Salutem in salutis auctore. Noverit 
universitas vestra me in viduitate mea dedisse, concessisse, et hac 
presenti carta mea confirmasse deo et Monasterio Sancte Marie 
et Sancti Andree de Lundors et Monachis ibidem Deo ser- 
vientibus et inperpetuum servituris, pro salute anime mee et 
animarum omnium antecessorum et successorum meorum, duas 
porciunculas terre infra tenementum meum de Kyndeloch, quas 
personaliter perambulavi, et abbatem de Lundors, suo et con- 



<kt# '4*vQS ^cmttefek^i tm 

y'v " " ^^- '. - """ ^T 

J . ' 'A vT, ' *?. , ^ /t*//' 




FOL. 9 r^/o (NO. cxxxvi) 



GRANT BY ELEN OF BRECHIN 177 

ventus sui nomine, in possessionem posui corporalem, ad 
ponendum sive staccandum petas suas, sive focale, quando- 
cunque eis videbitur expedire, et ad edificia in eisdem con- 
struenda pro dicto focali salvando. Quarum porciuncularum 
terre una vocatur Insula qui jacet ex parte boriali immediate 
juxta terrain dictorum monachorum quam habent et prius 
habuerimt in villa de Kyndelohc, et circumdata est ilia insula 
ex parte occidental! et boriali quodam Marisio quod anglice 
dicitur Seggymir, et ex parte orientali quodam Marisio quod 
vocatur anglice Much ell i ; alia vero porciuncula est in parte 
australi more de Edin, jacens, ex parte boriali, immediate ad 
Marisium monachorum quod alio nomine dicitur Mungrey. 
Et ilia porciuncula terre unam acram et quartam partem acre 
continet. Dedi eciam et concessi et hac presenti carta mea 
confirmavi dictis Monachis licenciam et liberam viam ducendi 
sive cariandi, sine impedimento, dictum focale suum, per terras 
meas de Kyndeloch de Marisio suo ad utrumque locum et 
extra quociescunque opus fuerit et dictis monachis placuerit. 
Et hanc presentem donacionem meam dictis monachis in 
puram et perpe|tuam elemosinam per me concessam et factam CM 
contra omnes homines et feminas libere et quiete warendizabo, 
Et warendizandum me et heredes meos per presentes oblige. 
In cujus rei testimonium presentibus sigillum meum apposui. 
Datum apud Lundors, die veneris in festo Sancti Bartholomei 
apostoli, Anno gracie mccc secundo; Hiis testibus, domino 
Johanne decano Dunblanensi, dominis Roberto et Johanne 
Capellanis meis, Magistris Michaele et Thoma clericis meis, 
Waltero Byseth, Johanne de Kyndeloch, Roberto Cumyn, et 
multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 

'CHARTER of ELENA of BRECHIN concerning a place granted for the 
ABBOT'S PEATS and concerning two small portions of the land of 
KYNDELOCH/ 

ELENA, relict of the late Sir William of Brechin, Lady of Kynde- 
loch, in her widowhood, gives, grants, and confirms to Lundors, for the 
weal of her soul and the souls of all her ancestors and successors, two 
small portions of land within her holding of Kyndeloch, ' which I have 
perambulated in person, and I have put the Abbot of Lundors, in the 
name of himself and his convent, in corporal possession, for placing 
and stacking {ad . . . staccandum) his peats, or fuel,' and for construct- 
or 



178 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ing building's for saving the said fuel. Of which small portions of land 
one is called Inch (Insuld), which lies to" the north, immediately next to 
the land which the monks have and had in the vill of Kyndeloch. And 
that Inch is surrounded on the west and north by a marsh, which is 
called in English Seggymir, and on the east by a marsh which is called 
in English Muchelli. But the other small portion is in the south part 
of the moor of Edin lying, on its north part, next adjoining the marsh 
of the monks, which by another name is called Mungrey. And that 
small portion of land contains one acre and a quarter. She also gives 
the monks a free road for drawing and carting (cariandi) the said fuel 
without hindrance through her lands of Kyndeloch from their marsh to 
each of the two places, and beyond, as often as they please and have 
need. She will warrant, and by the present charter obliges herself and her 
heirs to warrant this gift, in pure and perpetual alms, against all men 
and women. Her seal. Given at Lundors, on Friday, being the feast of 
St. Bartholomew the Apostle [Aug. 24], l MCCCII. Witnesses . . . 



CXXXVII 

Carta Super brueram in mora de Kyndloche et 
petera de Monegrey. 

UNIVERSIS Sancte Matris ecclesie filiis presens scriptum visuris 
vel audituris Rogerus de Quency, Comes Winton, Constabu- 
larius Scocie, Sal u tern in domino sempiternam. Noveritis nos 
caritatis intuitu, pro salute anime nostre et pro salute animarum 
antecessorum et successorum nostrorum, dedisse, concessisse et 
hac presenti Carta nostra confirmasse in liberam, puram, et per- 
petuam elemosinam, deo et ecclesie Sancte Marie de Lundors 
et Monachis ibidem Deo servientibus et in perpetuum servi- 
turis, ducentas Carratas bruere in mora nostra de Kyndoloch 
annuatim inperpetuum percipiendas in loco nobis et heredibus 
nostris minus nocivo et dictis Monachis competenciori. Et si 
ducente Carrate bruere eis non sufficiant volumus, quod ipsi 
MS. eandam. propinquiores sint omnibus aliis ad brueram eandem, a quantum 
necesse habuerint in eadem bruera; Dedimus eciam eisdem 
monachis et eorum successoribus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, 
ad sustentacionem domus sue de Lundors, licenciam fodiendi et 
percipiendi, annuatim imperpetuum, tot petas in petaria nostra 

1 The editor has verified this date as falling on Friday in the year 1302. 



GRANT BY ROGER DE QUINCY 179 

que vocatur Monegre quot voluerint ad sufficienciam sustenta- 
cionis sue. Ita videlicet quod nullus alius in dicta petera nostra 
petas fodiat sine licencia et voluntate dictorum monachorum, 
nee ipsi de predicta petera dabunt, nee vendent, nee aliquo 
alio modo alienabunt, nee conuertent nisi in usus proprios 
predicte domus sue ; concessimus eciam eisdem Monachis longi- 
tudinem et latitudinem unius acre in dicta mora eis annuatim 
assignande proximo adjacente loco in quo dictas | petas fodient, Lf 0/ - 1J -1 
In cujus quidem acre longitudine et latitudine predictas petas 
suas sine alicujus impedimento licite possint desiccare. Dedimus 
preterea dictis monachis unum messuagium adjacens proximo 
vado quod vocatur Ethyweyn ex parte orientali in campo de 
Thoreston continens duas acras terre, ad quod quidem mesua- 
gium attractum suum de bruera et petis facere possunt, et 
custos eorum, qui predictum mesuagium et focale custodiet, 
quicunque pro tempore fuerit, a duas vaccas et decem oves in w 
communi pastura more nostre de Kyndeloch habeat b pascentes. b M 
Volumus eciam quod predicti monachi et eorum homines cum 
suis bobus et carris liberum chiminagium habeant per rectum 
usque moram pro bruera, et per mediam moram pro petis et 
abinde ad mesuagium suum redeundo, sine alicujus impedi- 
mento vel contradiccione. Concedimus eciam eisdem monachis 
pro nobis et heredibus nostris quod eorum boves, qui predictum 
focale attraxerint, communem pasturam habeant in dicta mora 
nostra de Kyndeloch, a tempore quo inceperint ad trahendum 
usque ad Nativitatem beate Marie virginis annuatim ; Ita 
tamen quod nullatenus causa istius nostre donacionis seu con- 
cessionis aliquod de suis averiis nee aliquem de suis bobus in 
dicta pastura ponere possint, nisi solummodo boves suos dictum 
focale attrahentes per tempus prenotatum : Habendum et 
tenendum de nobis et heredibus nostris predictis monachis in 
perpetuum libere, quiete, et solute, secundum quod aliqua 
elemosina liberius, quiecius, et honorificencius dari potest vel 
concedi. Nos vero et heredes nostri predictas ducentas carratas 
bruere, et dictam peteram, cum omnibus aliis superius notatis, 
predictis monachis et eorum successoribus contra omnes gentes 
warantizabimus, acquietabimus, et inperpetuum defendemus. 
In cujus rei testimonium presens script um sigilli nostri muni- 
mine fecimus roborari. Hiis testibus, dominis Ricardo de 



180 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Wykes, Johanne Berkard, Johanne de Wemes, Roberto de 
Hereford et Philipo de Chetewind, militibus, Johanne de 
Kyndeloch, Christephero de Seton, Alexandro filio suo, Roberto 
et Rogero de Crafford, clericis, et aliis. Datum apud Dysart, 
prima dominica quadragesime, Anno domini M Ducentesimo 
Quadragesimo Septimo. 

(Abstract) 
' ON HEATHER on the MOOR of KYNDELOCH, and the PEAT-MOSS of 

MONEGREY. 

ROGER DE QUENCY, Earl of Winton, Constable of Scotland, grants to 
Lundors two hundred cart-loads (caratas) of heather, to be taken yearly 
011 his moor of Kyndeloch, at a place which was not injurious to him or 
his heirs, and was most suitable to the monks. And if the two hundred 
cart-loads of heather did not suffice, they were to take as much more as 
was wanted, inasmuch as they were nearer to the moor where the heather 
was to be had than any others. He also grants to the monks leave to 
dig and take as many peats in his peat-moss, c which is called Monegre,' 
as they need for their wants. No one should without the leave of the 
monks dig peats in the said peat-moss. But the monks were not to give, 
or to sell, or in any way to alienate anything from the peat-moss. The 
peats were to be solely for the use of their monastery (domus sue). He 
also grants to the monks land to the extent of one acre next adjoining 
the place where they dig the peats, in which acre they can dry their 
peats without hindrance. He also grants to the monks a messuage 
adjacent to the nearest ford, e which is called Ethyweyn, on the eastern 
side in the field (in campo) of Thoreston,' containing two acres of land, 
to which messuage they can draw their heather and peats; and the 
keeper who keeps the messuage and fuel is permitted to feed two cows 
and ten sheep on the common pasture of the moor of Kyndeloch. 
Further, the monks and their men are permitted to have a free road 
(chiminagium), in a straight line as far as the moor, for heather, and a 
free road through the middle of the moor for peats, and thence to the 
messuage in returning. The earl also grants that the monks' oxen 
which draw the said fuel may have common pasture on the moor of 
Kyndeloch from the time when they begin to draw up to the Nativity of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary [Sept. 8]. But this concession does not 
extend to any of the monks' beasts of burden (averiis) or any of their 
oxen save only the oxen which shall be engaged in drawing the fuel 
during the space of time already denned. These rights are to be held 
as freely as any alms are held. The seal of the earl. Witnesses . . . 
Given at Dysart on the First Sunday in Lent, in the year MccxLvn. 1 



1 In the year 1247-8 Easter fell on April igth, and therefore the First Sunday 
in Lent is March 8th. 



CONFIRMATION BY KING WILLIAM 181 

CXXXVIII 
Carta Willelmi regis Scocie. [>/. it.] 

WILLELMVS del gracia Rex Scottorum episcopis, abbatibus, 
comitibus, baronibus, justiciariis, vicecomitatibus, prepositis, 
ministris, et omnibus probis hominibus tocius terre sue, clericis 
et laicis, salutem. Sciant presentes et futuri me concessisse et 
hac carta mea confir masse deo et ecclesie sancte marie et 
sancti andree de Lundors et abbacie quam comes David frater 
meus ibi fundavit, et monachis ibidem Deo servientibus et 
servituris, in liberam et puram et perpetuam elemosinam, 
ecclesiam de Lundors, cum omnibus justis pertinenciis suis, et 
terram ad predictam ecclesiam pertinentem, per rectas divisas 
suas in bosco et piano, et totam terram ab occidentali parte 
rivuli descendentis de magno lacu usque in they preter insulam 
que vocatur Redinche. Et preterea unam piscariam in they 
juxta predictam insulam et asiamenta ipsius insule, scilicet, 
Redinche, ita eis communia ad proprios usus eorum sicut pre- 
fato comiti aut heredibus suis, et molendinum de Lundors, 
scilicet, molendinum ipsius ville de Lundors, cum omni secta 
sua et molitura ; Ita quod homines comitis facient omnia que 
pertinent ad molendinum sicut facere solebant tempore quo 
comes illud in manu sua habuit. Si autem molendinum comitis 
non possit molere, ipse bladum suum proprium molere faciet 
ad molendinum monachorum sine molitura. Et si molendinum 
monachorum molere non possit, ipsi molent ad molendinum 
comitis bladum suum proprium, similiter sine molitura. Con- 
cedo eciam eisdem monachis ecclesiam de Dunde cum omnibus 
pertinenciis suis, et unum thoftum in burgo de Dunde, liberum 
et quietum ab omni servicio et exaccione. Et ultra moneth 
Fyntre per rectas divisas suas et cum omnibus justis perti- 
nenciis suis, et ecclesiam ejusdem ville de Fyntre cum omnibus 
pertinenciis suis ; Et in Garviauch Letgavel et Malinth per 
rectas divisas suas, et cum omnibus pertinenciis suis. Concedo 
eciam eis ecclesiam de Inverury cum capella de Munethekin, 
et cum omnibus aliis justis pertinenciis suis, et ecclesiam de 
Durnach, et ecclesiam de Frame, et ecclesiam de Radmuriel, 



182 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

et ecclesiam de Inchemabanin, et ecclesiam de Kursamuel, et 
ecclesiam de Kelabemunt, cum capellis earundem ecclesiarum, 
et terris et decimis et oblacionibus omnimodis et omnibus 
justis pertinenciis suis, ad proprios usus et sustentaciones 
eorundem monachorum, et unum toftum in burgo de Inverury, 
liberum et quietum ab omni servicio et exaccione. Concede 
eciam eis decimam omnium lucrorum et placitorum infra 
terram comitis et extra, ultra moneth, quam habuerit tempore 
quo fecit donacionem istam, et decimam omnium lucrorum que 
ei proveniunt de lucris meis in toto regno meo, et decimam 
omnium rerum comitis et heredum suorum ultra moneth, 
scilicet, decimacionem bladi et farine, butiri et casei, carnis et 
venacionis, cibi et potus, et coriorum ferarum cum mota canum 
captarum, cere et salis, uncti et sepi, et omnium aliarum rerum 
que decimari possunt, et que dabuntur, vel vendentur, vel ad 
firmam ponentur, de maneriis comitis ultra moneth, vel eciam 
que in eis expendentur, preter assisos redditus denariorum quos 
comes habuerit tempore quo fecit hanc donacionem : Ita ut 
prenominati monachi omnia supradicta et in terris et in 
ecclesiis et in omnibus aliis ad proprios vsus et sustentaciones 
suas habeant et teneant. Concede eciam eis curiam suam 
[foi. 13.} omnino liberam, et dignitatem pacis et omnes alias libertates 
quas abbacia habere debet. Quare volo et precipio ut monachi 
prefate abbacie de Lundors habeant et possideant omnes pre- 
dictas terras, tenementa, et possessiones, et ecclesias, cum ca- 
pellis et terris et decimis et omnibus aliis iustis pertinenciis suis, 
in bosco et piano, in pratis et pascuis, in aquis et molendinis, 
in stagnis et viuariis, in piscariis, in viis et semitis, cum omnibus 
libertatibus et liberis consuetudinibus, sine omni seruicio et con- 
suetudine et auxilio et seculari exaccione, in liberam et puram 
et perpetuam elemosinam, ita bene et in pace, libere, quiete 
plenarie, integre, et honorifice sicut aliqua abbacia uel domus 
religionis in toto regno meo melius et liberius, quiecius, plenius, 
et honorificencius aliquam elemosinam tenet et possidet Ita 
ut nullus heredum prefati comitis fratris mei a predictis mona- 
chis quicquam, nisi solas oraciones ad anime salutem, exigere 
presumat : Ita libere quiete et plenarie et honorifice, sicut 
carta eiusdem comitis fratris mei testatur et confirmat. Testi- 
bus, et cetera. 



CONFIRMATION BY JOHN THE SCOT 183 

(Abstract) 
' CHARTER of WILLIAM, KING of SCOTLAND.' 

' WILLIAM, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to the bishops, 
abbots, earls, barons, justiciars, sheriffs, provosts, officers, and all good 
men of his whole land, clerical and lay, greeting.' He confirms to 
Lundors the gift of Earl David, his brother, [as contained in Charter n.]. 
But the following variations have to be noted. He excepts the island 
which is called Redinche. He grants one fishing on the Tay near the 
said island, but no express mention is made of the yare. The easements 
of Redinche, as common to the monks and Earl David, are confirmed, 
so that there is no real difference in substance between this Charter 
and Charter n. as regards Redinche. But Inch (Insula) at Perth is not 
mentioned. When confirming the tithe of Earl David's property beyond 
the Mounth, the present Charter excepts certain payments of rent in 
money (prefer assisos redditus denarioruni). Again, it is worthy of notice 
that in the concluding paragraph, where Earl David uses the word 
'successors,' King William's confirmation uses the word 'heirs.' On 
this difference the lawyer who drew up the legal opinion contained in 
CXLIX. founds an argument. There are differences in the spelling of the 
names of places, which suggest that the scribe who copied the present 
Charter adapted the orthography of the names, or of some of them, 
to the pronunciation of the later time when he wrote ; for example, 
'Inverurin' of Charter n. becomes ' Inverury.' 



CXXXIX 

Johannes de Scocia. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum visuris uel audituris Johannes e Scocia 
comes de Huntedon, Salutem. Sciatis me concessisse et hac 
present! carta mea confirmasse deo et ecclesie sancte marie 
et sancti andree de Lundors et monachis ibidem deo serui- 
entibus, donacionem illam quam bone memorie pater meus 
comes Dauid fecit eisdem, scilicet, totam terram que iacet ab 
occidentali parte riuuli descendentis de magno lacu de Lun- 
dors usque in they, et totam insulam que vocatur redinche, 
preter vnam yharam, molendinum eciam predicte ville de 
Lundors, cum omni secta sua et multura, terram quoque 
quam tenent in Mernes ex dono eiusdem patris mei, terram de 
Perte que vocatur insula, et, vltra moneth, fmtreth, Ledgauel 
et malind, cum omnibus pertinenciis, et per rectas divisas 
predictarum terrarum ; Ecclesias quoque de Lundors, de 



184 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Dunde, de tfintreth, de Inuerury, de Durnach, de Prameth, de 
Rathmuriel, de Inchemabanin, de Kilsamuel, de Kilalkmund, 
et de dono Normanni, constabulary, ecclesiam de Lescelyn, 
cum terns et decimis et omnibus ad predictas ecclesias iuste 
pertinentibus, et vnum plenarium toftum in villa de Perth, 
quern Euerardus flandrensis quondam tenuit, et vnum ple- 
narium toftum in Dunde, vnum plenarium toftum in Inuerury, 
vnam carucatam terre in Neutyle de dono Ade sororis mee. 
Concede eciam eis decimam omnium lucrorum et placitomm 
meorum, infra terram meam et extra, vltra moneth, et decimam 
omnium rerum mearum et heredum meorum vltra moneth, 
sicut in carta predicti patris mei continetur. Quare volo et 
concede ut predicta ecclesia de Lundors et monachi ibidem 
deo seruientes habeant, teneant, et possideant omnia predicta 
cum omnibus suis pertinenciis, et curiam suam liberam omnino, 
et dignitatem pacis, et omnes liberas consuetudines quas 
aliqua abbacia habere debet in regno Scocie, sine omni seruicio 
et consuetudine et exaccione seculari, in liberam et puram et per- 
petuam elemosinam, Ita quod nee ego nee aliquis successorum 
meorum aliquid ab eis exigat, nisi solas oraciones ad anime 
salutem pertinentes, sicut carta predicti patris mei eisdem facta 
testatur. Hiis testibus, etc. 

(Abstract) 
[' JOHN of SCOTLAND.' 

NOTE. This Charter does not vary from Charter xv. except in the 
spelling 1 of some of the names of places. These variations can be seen 
on a comparison of the Latin texts of the two charters, and it has not 
been thought necessary to reproduce the translation here.] 



CXL 

Cokeburn super diuisione terre de Collelessy et 
Cardynside, 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus presens scriptum visuris uel audituris 
Johannes de Kocbrun, Salutem eternam in domino. Nouerit uni- 
uersitas vestra me, pro salute anime mee etanimarum omnium 
antecessorum et successorum meorum, dedisse, concessisse, et hac 




GRANT BY JOHN COCKBURN 185 

presenti Carta mea confirmasse, deo et monasterio de Lundors 
et monachis ibidem deo seruientibus et seruituris in perpetuum 
totam terrain illam cum pertinenciis | que iacet in latitudine \J 1 ' *] 
inter magnam viam, que ducit de villa mea de Cullessin ad 
monasterium de Lundors, et terrain ipsorum monachorum que 
dicitur Cardynside ; Et in longitudine incipiendo a terra 
eorundem Monachorum que dicitur Suthleys versus aquilonem 
vsque ad riuulum qui currit in magnum lacum inter me et 
ipsos, cum ilia particula terre quam eis extendi et limitari a a MS. Hmitare. 
feci ex parte australi predicte magne vie, recta linea, a terra 
mea que dicitur Wudeknocside versus aquilonem vsque in 
medium prati eorundem Monachorum quod dicitur pratum 
magni lacus. Preterea dedi, concessi, et presenti Carta mea 
confirmaui eisdem Monachis duas acras terre extra villam de 
Culessin versus aquilonem, ad faciendum eis vnum mesuagium 
vbi possint petas et alia bona sua attrahere et saluo custodire, 
si voluerint ; Et liberum transitum seu cheminagium per 
mediam terram meam de Coulessin, videlicet eundo per mediam 
villam meam de Coulessin cum eorum hominibus, equis, et 
bobus, plaustris et carrectis, versus petariam suam in mora de 
Edyne, et redeundo per eandem viam sicut ire consueverunt, 
ad trahenda focalia sua, sine perturbacione mei vel meorum 
seu heredum vel assignatorum meorum, saluo blado nostro et 
herbagio. Et si contingat quod eorum boues, seu plaustra, 
Equi, vel carrecte, per negligenciam hominum suorum, vel 
aliquo alio casu bladurn nostrum seu herbagium secus viam 
calcauerint et dampnum fecerint, dicti Monachi ad visum pro- 
borum virorum, sine aliqua inprecacione, namacione, seu per- 
turbacione mei vel meorum vel heredum seu assignatorum 
meorum, illud dampnum racionabiliter restaurabunt. Volo 
eciam et concede vt quicumque predictas duas acras terre de 
dictis monachis aliquo tempore tenuerint habeant asiamentum 
pasture vbi homines mei vel heredum seu assignatorum meorum 
de Culessin pascunt sua animalia, ad unum equum, duas vaccas, 
et viginti oues, cum eorum sequela vnius anni. Concede 
eciam et volo quod predicti Monachi teneant et habeant totam 
predictam terram, cum predicto cheminagio et omnibus supra- 
nominatis, in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam, Ita 
libere et quiete, plenarie, et pacifice, et honorifice in omnibus 



186 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

quod nee ego nee heredes mei uel assignati nee aliquis alius 
aliquid ab eis exigere poterimus, nisi solas oraciones ad 
animarum salutem. Et ego Johannes et heredes seu assignati 
mei totam predictam terram cum cheminagio et aliis supra 
nominatis, in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam, pre- 
dietis Monachis contra omnes homines et feminas warentiza- 
bimus et defendemus, et ab omnimodis auxiliis, excercitibus, 
secularibus seruiciis, et demandis, inperpetuum acquietabimus. 
In cuius Rei testimonium presens scriptum sigilli mei munimine 
roboraui. Hiis testibus, dominis Hugone de Abirnyhethyn. 
Fergus Cumyn, Hugone de Beumys, Alano d[e] Harcaris et 
Edwardo de Pethglassyne, militibus, Johanne de Kyndeloch, 
Roberto de 1 Mabilie, Roberto de Drumgreue, Nicholaio de 
Ramesei, Jordano, Willelmo de Fliske, et multis aliis. 

(Abstract) 
' COKEBURN on the DIVISION of the LAND of COLLESSY and CARDYNSIDE.' 

JOHN DE KOCBRUN, for the weal of his soul, and of the souls of his 
ancestors and successors, gives, grants, and by the present charter 
confirms to Lundors 'that whole land with its pertinents which lies 
in breadth between the main road (magnam viam), which leads from 
my vill of Cullessin to the monastery of Lundors, and the land of the 
monks which is called Cardynside, and in length, beginning from the 
land of the same monks which is called Suthleys, towards the north 
as far as the burn (rivulum) running into the great lake, between me and 
them, with that small portion (particula) of land which I have caused to 
be estimated (extendi), and bounded for them on the south part of the 
aforesaid main road, in a right line from my land which is called Wude- 
knocside northward as far as the middle of the meadow belonging to 
the same monks, which is called the meadow of the great lake/ More- 
over, he gives to the monks two acres of laud outside the vill of Culessin, 
towards the north, where they may make a messuage for themselves, to 
which they can draw their peats and other goods, and there, if they wish, 
keep them safe ; and also a free passage or road by the midst of his land 
of Coulessin, to wit, in going through the midst of his vill of Coulessin, 
with their men, horses, oxen, waggons, and carts (carrectis), towards 
their peat-moss in the moor of Edyne, and in returning, by the same 
way, as they had been accustomed for the purpose of drawing their 
fuel, without any disturbance on the part of him, his heirs, and 
assignees, excepting [damage to] their corn and meadow-grass (herbagio). 
And if it happened that the monks' oxen or waggons, horses or carts, 

1 An attempt seems to have been made to erase ' de. ' 



GRANT OF THE CHURCH OF COLLESSIE 187 

through the negligence of the men, or by any other chance, trampled or 
damaged his corn or meadow-grass outside the path (secus viam) the 
monks ' at the sight of good men ' were to give reasonable restitution 
without any poinding or other disturbance on the part of him, his heirs, 
or assignees. He also grants that whoever might at any time hold the 
two acres of the monks should have the easement of pasture for one 
horse, two cows, and twenty sheep, with their young (sequela) up to a 
year old, where his men of Culessin pasture their animals. He also 
grants that the monks should have the land, the right of free passage, 
and the other privileges before named, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, 
so freely that he, his heirs, or assignees, or any other, could not exact 
anything from the monks, save only prayers for the weal of souls. He 
promises that he and his heirs and assignees will warrant and defend the 
aforesaid to the monks ' against all men and women,' and will acquit 
them for ever for all manner of aids, hostings, and secular services and 
demands. His seal. Witnesses . . . 



CXLI 
Carta super ecclesia de Cullessi. 

OMNIBVS presens scriptum v-isuris vel audituris, Rogems de 
Quency Comes Wynton, Constabularius Scocie, eternam in 
domino salutem. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra nos caritatis 
intuitu, et pro salute anime nostre, et pro animabus ante- 
cessorum et successorum nostrorum, dedisse, concessisse, et pre- 
senti carta nostra confirmasse deo et beate marie et ecclesie 
sancti andree de Lundors et abbati et conuentui ibidem deo 
seruientibus et in perpetuum seruituris, ecclesiam de Cullessyn 
cum omnibus suis pertinenciis ; Habendam et tenendam dicto 
abbati et conuentui et eorum successoribus, in liberam, puram, 
et perpetuam elemosinam, libere, quiete, bene, et in pace in [/<?/. 
perpetuum sicut aliqua ecclesia melius, liberius, et quiecius 
in Regno Scocie dari poterit et concedi, videlicet, quod cedente 
vel decedente magistro Ada de Malcariuston, Rectore dicte 
ecclesie, liceat predictis abbati et conuentui et eorum succes- 
soribus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, in dictam ecclesiam 
pacifice intrare, possidere, et in vsus proprios conuertere, si 
eandem ecclesiam in vsus proprios aliquatenus possint im- 
petrare. Et si eandem ecclesiam in vsus proprios conuertendam 



188 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

possint impetrare, et optinere, nos vel heredes nostri nichil 
iuris seu clamium in dicta ecclesia de cetero exigenms seu 
vendicabimus, nee contra suam impetracionem in aliquo 
veniemus. Et nos et heredes nostri dictam donacionem, con- 
cessionem, et confirmacionem dicte ecclesie de Cullessyn cum 
omnibus suis pertinenciis, vt prenominatum est, dictis abbati 
et conuentui et eorum successoribus contra omnes gentes in 
perpetuum warentizabimus. Set si dictam ecclesiam in vsus 
proprios conuertendam non possint impetrare, jus aduocacionis 
in dictam ecclesiam ad nos et heredes nostros expresse et sine 
alicuius contradiccione reuertetur. In cuius Rei testimonium 
et securitatem, presentem cartam sigilli nostri impression e 
duximus roborandam. Hiis testibus, dominis Willelmo de 
Oylby, Johanne Becard, militibus, magistro Ada de Malcarius- 
ton, magistro Eustachio de Sceleford, Domino Ricardo de 
Radeswel, Magistro Roberto tune phisico nostro, domino Wil- 
lelmo de Sancto Edwardo capellano. Saero de Seton, Rogero 
Raboch, Alexandro de Seton, Rogero Bourc, clerico, et aliis. 



(Abstract) 
' CHARTER on the CHURCH of CULLESSI.' 

ROGER DE QUENCY, Earl of Wynton, Constable of Scotland, for the 
weal of his soul and of the souls of his ancestors and successors, gives, 
grants, and confirms to Lundors ( the church of Cullessyn with all its 
pertinents, in free, pure, and perpetual alms, as freely as any church in 
the kingdom of Scotland could be given, so that on the resignation or 
death of Master Adam de Malcarivston, rector of the said church, it 
shall be lawful for the abbot and convent and their successors ' for us 
and our heirs' (i.e. so far as they were concerned) to enter, possess, and 
convert to their own uses the said church, if they shall be able to obtain 
(by procuring the consent of the bishop) the church for their own uses. 
And if they are able to obtain the church for their own uses, he and his 
heirs will in future exact no right or claim in the said church, nor in 
any way oppose the endeavours of the monks to obtain it. He will 
warrant the gift of the church with its pertinents 'against all people.' 
But if the monks cannot succeed in obtaining the right to convert the 
church to their own uses, the right of advowson to the same church 
shall revert without any dispute to the earl and his heirs. His seal. 
Witnesses . . - 1 



This is a repetition of Charter cxxxi. 



GAMBLING CONFIRMATION OF COLLESSIE 189 

CXLII 

Concessio in husus proprios Ecclesie de Cowlessi 
per episcopum. 

OMNIBVS christi fidelibus audituris has literas vel visuris, 

Gamelinus miseracione diuina ecclesie Sancti Andree minister 

humilis, Salutem in domino sempiternam. Nouerit vniuersitas 

vestra nos, intuitu domini et beate marie virginis, et beati 

andree apostoli patroni ecclesie de Lundors, Dedisse, con- 

cessisse, et nostra episcopali auctoritate confirmasse, prefate 

ecclesie de Lundors et Religiosis viris abbati et conuentui 

eiusdem loci deo seruientibus ibidem et in perpetuum semituris, 

in vsus suos proprios ecclesiam de Cullessyn cum omnibus 

iuribus et pertinenciis suis ad instanciam nobilis viri domini 

Rogeri de Quency, Comitis Wynton, Constabularii Scocie, 

patroni eiusdem ecclesie, quam ipse,pro salute anime sue et ante- 

cessorum et successorum suorum, eisdem Monachis, quantum 

in ipso fuit, per cartam suam perpetuo possidendam donavit, 

sicut in eadem carta quam inde habent plenius continetur; 

Ita videlicet quod, cedente vel decedente Magistro Ada de 

Malcariuston rectore predicte ecclesie, liceat eisdem Abbati et 

conventui eandem ecclesiam de Cullessyn tanquam suam pro- 

priam, auctore Deo, ingredi ac in perpetuum tenere et in usus 

proprios pacifice possidere; Ita libere, quiete, plenarie, et 

honorifice in omnibus sicut alii viri religiosi in diocesi Sancti 

Andree ecclesias in usus proprios liberius, quiecius, plenius, et 

honorin'cencius tenent ac possident ; Salva vicario in eadem 

ecclesia perpetuo servituro sufficienti et honesta sustentacione 

sua de proventibus et bonis ejusdem ecclesie, et salvis nobis, 

et successoribus nostris, episcopalibus juribus nostris in omnibus. 

In cujus rei testimonium sigillum nostrum presentibus duximus 

apponendum. Hiis testibus, domino Gilberto priore Sancti 

Andree, Magistro Ada de Malcariuston preposito ecclesie 

Sancte Marie ejusdem civitatis, domino Johanne priore de 

Aberbrothock, domino David de Lochor, domino Thoma de 

Brad, domino Rogero de Walichop, Magistro Gilberto de 

Heris, tune officiario, Johanne de Kyndeloch, dominis Willelmo 

de Dalgarnoc, Bartholomeo, tune decano de Fyf, Ada de 



190 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Anand, Henrico de Newton, Johanne de Eglisfeld et aliis. 
Datum apud Ueruasyn, Nonas Junii, Anno etc. Millesimo cc 
sexagesimo secundo. 

(Abstract) 

' GRANT of the CHURCH of COWLESSI for [our] own uses by the BISHOP.' 

' GAMELIN, by divine pity humble servant (minister) of the church 
of St. Andrews,' grants, and confirms by his episcopal authority, to 
the monks of Lundors, the church of Cullessyn with all its pertinents 
for their own uses, at the instance of Sir Roger de Quency, Earl of 
Wynton, Constable of Scotland, patron of the said church, which he, 
for the weal of his soul and the soul of his ancestors and successors, 
gave, as far as he could give, to the monks, by his charter, as in the 
same charter, which the monks possess, is more fully contained ; to the 
effect that on the resignation or death of Master Adam de Malcarivston, 
rector of the said church, it should be lawful for the monks to enter the 
church as though it were their own through the gift of God (auctore Deo), 
to hold and possess it peaceably for their own uses, as freely as any other 
religious in the diocese of St. Andrews most freely hold and possess 
churches for their own use saving to the perpetual vicar serving in the 
church a sufficient and decent maintenance from the revenues and goods 
of the same church, and ' saving to us and our successors our episcopal 
rights in all things.' His seal. Witnesses . . . Given at Dervasyn 
[Dairsie], the Nones of June [June 5], MCOLXII. 



CXLIII 
16.] Resignacio ecclesie de Cowlessy per Rectorem. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus has literas visuris vel audituris Adam 
de Malcariuston, prepositus ecclesie sancte Marie civitatis 
sancti andree, et domini pape capellanus, Salutem in domino. 
Noveritis me de voluntate et licencia bone memorie domini 
Gamellini dei gracia episcopi Sancti Andree, prout in instru- 
mento suo super hoc confecto plenius continetur, resignasse 
ecclesiam Meam de Cullessyn in Manus domini Thome Abbatis 
de Lundors, et omni juri, quod in eadem ecclesia habui vel 
habere potui, penitus cessisse, contra quas meas resignacionem 
et cessionem promitto fideliter me nunquam aliquid attempta- 
turum. In cujus rei testimonium presentibus literis sigillum 
meum apposui. Datum apud Lundors, Sabbato proximo post 
festum Sancti Barnabe apostoli, Anno gracie millesimo cc 
sexagesimo secundo. 



THE CHURCH OF COLLESSIE 191 

(Abstract) 

1 RESIGNATION of the CHURCH of COWLKSSY by the RKCTOR.' 
ADAM DE MALCARIVSTON, provost of the church of St. Mary in the 
city of St. Andrews, and chaplain of the Pope, makes known to all that, 
with the licence of Gamelin, late Bishop of St. Andrews, as is more 
fully contained in the instrument of the bishop on the subject, he had 
resigned his church of Cullessyn into the hands of Thomas, Abbot of 
Lundors, and had wholly surrendered all right which he had, or could 
have, in that church ; contrary to which resignation and surrender he 
now promises that he will never take any action. His seal attached. 
' Given at Lundors, on Saturday next after the feast of St. Barnabas the 
Apostle' [June 11], MCCLXII. 

CXLIV 

Confirmacio Capituli S. A. super ecclesia de C. 

OMNIBVS Christi fidelibus presentes literas visuris vel audituris 

Gilbertus Dei gracia Prior cathedralis ecclesie sancti Andree 

et ejusdem loci Conventus humilis, salutem eternam in Domino. 

Noverit universitas vestra nos de communi consensu capituli 

nostri, auctoritate dei et beati andree apostoli, caritatis intuitu, 

concessisse et hac present! carta nostra confirmasse ecclesie 

sancte marie et sancti andree de Lundors et Monachis ibidem 

deo servientibus et in perpetuum servituris ecclesiam de 

Cullessyn, Sancti Andree diocesis, cum omnibus juribus et 

pertinenciis suis, quam nobilis vir, dominus Rogerus de Quency, 

Comes Wynton, et constabularius Scocie, patronus ejusdem 

ecclesie de Cullessyn, pro salute anime sue et antecessorum 

et successorum suorum, eisdem Monachis, quantum in ipso fuit, 

per cartam suam donavit, Et venerabilis pater Gamelinus 

divina providencia episcopus noster Sancti Andree eisdem pie 

contulit et concessit ac per cartam suam confirmavit in usus 

suos proprios perpetuo possidendam prout in eisdem cartis 

quas inde habent plenius continetur : Ita, videlicet, quod, 

cedente vel decedente Magistro Ada de Malcarston rectore 

predicte ecclesie, liceat eisdem monachis eandem ecclesiam de 

Cullessyn tanquam suam propriam autore Deo ingredi ac in- 

perpetuum tenere et in usus proprios pacifice possidere, ita 

libere, quiete, plenarie, et honorifice in omnibus sicut alii viri 

religiosi in diocesi Sancti Andree ecclesias suas in usus 

proprios liberius, quiecius, plenius, et honorificencius tenent et 

possident ; Salva vicario in eadem ecclesia perpetuo servituro 

sufficienti et honesta sustentacione sua de proventibus et bonis 



192 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

ejusdem ecclesie ; Et salvis dicto domino nostro Episcopo 
Sancti Andree et suis successoribus juribus suis episcopalibus in 
omnibus. In cujus rei testimonium presens scriptum apposi- 
cione communis sigilli capituli nostri duximus roborandum. 
Teste capitulo ipso. Apud sanctum Andream, die sancti bar- 
nabe apostoli, Anno grade millesimo cc sexagesimo secundo. 

(Abstract) 
' CONFIRMATION of the CHARTER of ST. A[NDREWS] on the CHURCH 

of C[ULLESSYN].' 

f GILBERT, by the grace of God, Prior of the cathedral church of 
St. Andrews and the humble convent of the same place,' with the 
common consent of the chapter, f by the authority of God and of 
Blessed Andrew, the Apostle,' at the prompting of charity, grant and 
by this charter confirm to Lundors the church of Cullessyn in the 
diocese of St. Andrews, with all its rights and pertinents, which 
Roger de Quency, Earl of Wynton and Constable of Scotland, patron 
of the same church, gave, as far as in him lay, to the monks of Lundors, 
for the weal of his soul and of his ancestors and successors, and which 
' the venerable father, Gamelin, by divine providence our Bishop of St. 
Andrews, piously conferred and granted, and by his charter confirmed, 
to be possessed by them for ever for their own uses, as in the same 
charters, which they have, is more fully contained.' In such wise 
that on the resignation or death of Master Adam de Malcarston, rector 
of the said church, it shall be lawful for the same monks to enter, hold 
for ever, and peaceably possess for their own uses the same church of 
Cullessyn, as if it were their own by the gift of God, as freely, quietly, 
fully, and honourably in all things as other religious in the diocese of 
St. Andrews hold and possess churches for their own uses saving to the 
perpetual vicar, who will serve in the church, his sufficient and decent 
maintenance out of the revenues and goods of the same church, and 
saving to the said lord, our Bishop of St. Andrews, and his successors 
their episcopal rights in all things. The common seal of the chapter. 
' Witness, the chapter itself.' At St. Andrews, the day of St. Barnabas 
the Apostle [June 11], MCCLXII. l 

CXLV 

Recepcio litere resignacionis ecclesie de Cowlessy 
per episcopum Sancti Andree. 

OMNIBVS Christi fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Willelmus, miseracione divina ecclesie Sancti Andree minister 

1 According to Bower (Scotichronicon> lib. vi. c. li. in Goodall's edit., vol. i. 
p. 368), Prior Gilbert died 'xvj. Kal. Aprilis, MCCLXIII.,' i.e. i;th March 1263-4. 



THE CHURCH OF COLLESSIE 193 

humilis, Salutem eternam in domino. Noverit universitas 
vestra nos literas resignacionis et cessionis Magistri Ade de 
Malcarston super ecclesia de Cullessyn, non cancellatas non 
abolitas, nee in aliqua sui parte viciatas, sigillo suo signatas 
diligenter inspexisse, in forma subscripta. Omnibus Christi 
fidelibus has literas visuris vel audituris Adam de Malcarston, 
prepositus ecclesie Sancte Marie civitatis Sancti Andree, et 
domini pape capellanus, Salutem in domino. Noveritis me de 
voluntate et licencia bone memorie Domini Gamelini, dei 
gracia episcopi Sancti Andree, prout, in instrumento suo super 
hoc confecto, plenius continetur, resignasse ecclesiam meam de 
Cullessyn in manus domini Thome Abbatis de Lundors, et 
omni juri quod in eadem ecclesia habui vel hafcere potui 
penitus cessisse, contra quas meas resignacionem et cessionem, 
promitto fideliter me nunquam attemptaturum. In cujus rei 
testimonium, presentibus literis sigillum meum apposui. Data 
apud Lundors, Sabbato proximo post festum Sancti Barnabe 
apostoli, Anno | gracie millesimo ducentesimo sexagesimo [/*/. 
secundo. Nos vero predictas cessionem et resignacionem, 
ratas firmasque habentes, ac volentes eas stabiles et incon- 
cussas perpetuo permanere, illas auctoritate nostra episcopali 
confirmamus et suplemus defectum si quis habitus est in 
predictis. Et si quid de cetero secus actum fuerit, illud totum 
irritum decernimus et inane. In cujus rei testimonium, 
presens scriptum sigilli nostri impressione roboravimus. Data 
apud Monimel, die veneris proxima post Epiphaniam domini, 
Anno gracie millesimo ducentesimo septuagesimo septimo. 

(Abstract) 

' RECEPTION by the BISHOP of ST. ANDREWS of a LETTER of RESIGNATION 
of the CHURCH of COWLESSY. 

( WILLIAM, by the divine pity, humble servant (minister) of the church 
of St. Andrews/ makes known to all that he has diligently inspected 
letters of resignation and cession of the church of Cullessyn written by 
Master Adam de Malcarston. He found these letters not cancelled., 
erased, or in any part vitiated, and sealed with the seal of Master Adam. 
These letters ran in the following form : ' To all the faithful in Christ 
who shall see or hear these letters, Adam de Malcarston, Provost of the 
church of St. Mary in the city of St. Andrews, and chaplain of our Lord 
the Pope, greeting in the Lord. Know ye that with the goodwill and 

N 



194 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

permission of Gamelin, of good memory, l by the grace of God, Lord 
Bishop of St. Andrews, as in the instrument executed by him on this 
matter is more fully contained, I have resigned my church of Cullessyn 
into the hands of Thomas, lord abbot of Lundors, and have wholly ceded 
all right which I had, or could have, in the same church, in opposition to 
which resignation and cession I faithfully promise that I will never raise 
any question. In testimony of which thing I have put my seal to the 
present letters. Given at Lundors, on the Saturday next after the feast 
of St Barnabas the Apostle [June 11], in the year of grace one thousand, 
two hundred and sixty-two.' The Bishop of St. Andrews holds this 
resignation and cession to be good and valid, and confirms it by his 
episcopal authority. If there be any defect in the resignation, he (the 
bishop) supplies anything lacking ; and anything done to the contrary in 
the future he decrees to be null and void. The bishop's seal. ' Given 
at Monimel on the Friday next after the Epiphany of our Lord [Jan. 6], 
in the year of grace MCCLXXVII.' 

CXLVI 

Confirmacio alia super ecclesia de Cowlessy. 

OMNIBVS Christ! fidelibus hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris 
Willelmus, permissione divina ecclesie Sancti Andree minister 
humilis, salutem eternam in domino. Noverit universitas 
vestra nos confirmacionem bone memorie domini Gamelini dei 
gracie predecessoris nostri factam religiosis viris, abbati et 
comientui de Lundors, super ecclesia de Cullessyn sigillo suo 
autentico signatam,non cancellatam, a non abolitam,nec in aliqua 
sui parte viciatam, inspexisse in forma subscripta. Omnibus 
Christi fidelibus audituris has literas vel visuris, Gemelinus, 
miseracione diuina ecclesie Sancti Andree minister humilis, 
Salutem in domino sempiternam. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra nos 
intuitu dei et beate marie virginis, et beati andree apostoli, 
patroni ecclesie de Lundors, dedisse, concessisse, et nostra episco- 
pali auctoritate confirmasse prefate ecclesie de Lundors et reli- 
giosis viris, abbati et conuentui eiusdem loci, deo seruientibus 
ibidem et in perpetuum seruituris, invsus suos proprios,ecclesiam 
de Cullessyn, cum omnibus iuribus et pertinenciis suis ad instan- 
ciam nobilis viri domini Rogeri de Quency comitis Wyntonie, 

1 The words ' of good memory ' must have been inserted into the letters of 
Master Adam, possibly by Bishop William Wiseheart's scribe, for Gamelin was 
alive when Master Adam's letters were written. Gamelin died, according to 
Bower (Scotickronicon, lib. vi. c. xliii Goodall's edit., vol. i. p. 360), ' in crastino 
Sancti Vitalis April 29], anno Domini MCCLXXI.' 



THE CHURCH OF COLLESSIE 195 

constabulary Scocie, patron i eiusdem ecclesie, quam ipse pro 
salute anime sue, et antecessorum et successorum suorum, eisdem 
monachis, quantum in ipso fuit, per cartam suam perpetuo pos- 
sidendam, donauit ; sicut in eadem carta, quam inde habent, 
plenius continetur ; Ita, videlicet, quod cedente vel decedente 
magistro adam de malcarstoun, Rectore predicte ecclesie, liceat 
eisdem abbati et conuentui eandem ecclesiam de Cullessyn, 
tanquam suam propriam auctore deo ingredi ac in perpetuum 
tenere, et in vsus proprios pacifice possidere, Ita libere, quiete, 
plenarie et honorifice in omnibus sicut alij viri religiosi in diocesi 
sancti andree ecclesias suas in vsus proprios liberius, quiecius, 
plenius et honorificencius tenent ac possident ; Salua vicario, 
in eadem ecclesia perpetuo seruituro, sufficienti et honesta 
sustentacione sua, de prouentibus et bonis eiusdem ecclesie, et 
saluis nobis et successoribus nostris episcopalibus iuribus 
nostris in omnibus. In cuius rei testimonium sigillum nostrum 
presentibus duximus apponendum : Hiis testibus, domino 
Gilberto priore Sancti Andree, Magistro Adam de Malkar- 
stoun, preposito ecclesie Sancte Marie eiusdem ciuitatis, 
domino Johanne priore de Aberbrothoch, domino Dauide de 
Lochor, domino Thoma de Brad, domino Rogero de Walychop, 
magistro Gilberto de Herys, tune officiali, Johanne de Kyn- 
deloch, dominis Willelmo de Dalgernoch, Bartholomeo tune 
decano de Fyfe, Adam de Anand, Henrico de Neutune, 
Johanne de Eglisfeld, et alijs, Datum apud Deruasyn, nonas 
Junij, Anno gracie M cc. Sexagesimo secundo. Nos igitur, 
ipsius domini Gamelini, bone memorie, predecessoris nostri, 
vestigijs inherentes, damus, concedimus et confirmamus, 
nostra episcopali auctoritate, prefate ecclesie de Lundors, et 
monachis predictis, predictam ecclesiam de Cullessyn, cum 
omnibus iuribus et pertinenciis suis ; Tenendam et perpetuo 
possidendam in vsus suos proprios, adeo libere et quiete sicut 
dominus quondam Rogerus de Quency, comes Wyntonie, verus 
patronus eiusdem ecclesie, illam, quantum in ipso fuit, donauit, 
et prefatus predecessor noster eandem eis dedit, concessit, et 
confirmauit. Concessionem eciam et resignacionem, quas 
magister Adam de Malcarstoun, dudum rector eiusdem 
ecclesie, fecit eisdem de prefata ecclesia, et omni iure quod 
ipse habuit in eadem, approbamus, concedimus, et confir- 



196 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

mamus. Decernimus, eciam, irritum et inane, si secus actum 
fuerit de prefata ecclesia. 

(Abstract) 
'ANOTHER CONFIRMATION upon the CHURCH of COWLESSY.' 

WILLIAM, Bishop of St. Andrews, makes known that he had inspected 
the Confirmation of Gamelin of good memory, f our predecessor,' and 
had found it to be not cancelled, erased, or in any part vitiated, and 
that it ran in the form following. He then transcribes the Confirmation 
of Gamelin, which is to be found in Charter CXLII. At the close of the 
transcript the Charter resumes its course as follows. 'We therefore 
walking in the footsteps of Lord Gamelin, our predecessor of good 
memory, give, grant, and confirm, by our episcopal authority, to the 
aforesaid church of Lundors and the monks aforesaid, the aforesaid 
church of Cullessyn, with all its rights and pertinents, to be held and 
possessed for their own uses as freely and quietly as the late Lord Roger 
de Quency, Earl of Wyntonia, true patron of the same church, gave it, 
so far as it was in his power, and our aforesaid predecessor gave, 
granted, and confirmed the same to them.' He further approves and 
confirms the resignation and concession of Adam de Malcarstoun (see 
Charter CXLV.), and decrees that any thing that might be done to the 
contrary should be null and void. 1 

CXLVII 

is.] De protectione regis Dauid. 

DAVID dei gracia Rex Scottorum, episcopis, Abbatibus, 
Comitibus, Baronibus, Justiciariis, Vicecomitibus, ac ceteris 
regni nostri ministris, clericis et laicis, salutem in domino 
sempiternam. Cum regiam maiestatem deceat viros religiosos 
deo deuote seruientes in pace, tranquilitate, et quiete confouere 
[et] eorum iura, libertates, et priuilegia, a nonnullis progenitori- 
bus nostris, regibus Scocie, predecessoribus nostris concessa, pia 
deuocione protegere, defendere, et conseruare ; Quia summa 
racio est que pro religione et religiosis facit ; Hinc est quod 
cum per inspeccionem cartarum religiosorum virorum, abbatis 
et conuentus monasterij de Lundors, Sancti andree dyocesis, a 

1 There is nothing to determine the date of this Charter. William Wiseheart, 
the immediate successor of Gamelin, is probably the granter of the Charter. He 
occupied the see of St. Andrews from 1273 to 28th May 1279. But his successors, 
Frazer and Lamberton, each bore the name of William. 



CHARTER OF DAVID II. 197 

predecessoribus nostris regibus Scocie concessarum, ad plenum 
intelleximus predictos religiosos, monasterium suum, homines, 
terras, possessiones vbicumque infra regnum nostrum existentes, 
bona, ac omnia alia iura sua, ad predictos religiosos et monas- 
terium predictum spectancia, esse sub patronatu et regia 
maiestate regum Scocie, nullo medio, et pertinere ad eosdem ; 
Nos vestigijs predecessorum nostrorum regum inherentes, pre- 
dictos religiosos viros, monasterium suum, homines suos, terras 
et possessiones suas, vbicumque infra regnum nostrum existentes, 
sub nostra proteccione, patronatu, iurisdiccione, et regia 
maiestate nullo medio suscepimus, et recognoscimus fore sub- 
jectos, nee alium quemquam recognoscere debere, quantum ad 
superioritatis titulum, clameum, vel exaccionem secularem, 
preter nos, licet idem monasterium et dicti religiosi ibidem 
deo seruientes fuerint ab antique per Comitem Dauid, fratrem 
recolende memorie Willelmi regis Scocie predecessoris nostri 
fundati, et de diuersis terris et possessionibus in diuersis 
partibus regni nostri dotati. Quare vniuersitati vestre tenore 
presencium significamus et declaramus quod, licet terram 
nostram de le Garvyach nobis iure obuientem in consan- 
guineum nostrum Thomam Comitem de Marre transtulimus, 
et eidem per cartam concessimus, intencionis nostre seu volun- 
tatis nostre non extitit, nee est, dictos religiosos, monasterium 
suum, homines suos, terras, redditus, vel possessiones suas 
vbicumque existentes, et immediate ad nos pertinentes, in 
ipsum comitem de Marre, seu quemcunque alium transferre a 
nostro patronatu, vel regie maiestatis titulo abdicare, discidere, 
vel alienare : firmiter inhibentes ne predictus comes de Marre 
seu quicumque alius racione vel pretextu cuiuscumque dona- 
cionis siue concessionis per nos, quouismodo facte sen faciende 
in futurum, predictos religiosos, monasterium suum, homines 
suos, terras seu possessiones suas vbicumque infra regnum 
nostrum existentes, molestare vel inquietare presumant, seu 
quacunque causam questionis contra nostre regie maiestatis 
et intencionis voluntatem, ad preiudicium nostri status non 
modicum et grauamen, commouere aliqualiter vel attemptare, 
super nostram plenariam forisfacturam, ac sub pena omnium 
que erga nos amittere poterint quoquomodo, set pocius suis 
libertatibus, priuilegiis, possessionibus, et aliis aysiamentis 



198 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

quibuscunque a nobis fuel] nostris predecessoribus eisdem 
religiosis indultis et concessis, libere et quiete vti et gaudere 
permittant. In cuius rei testimonium sigillum nostrum pre- 
sentibus literis precepimus apponi, apud Edynburgh quinto- 
decimo die Decembris anno Regni nostri vicesimo nono. 

(Abstract) 
' OF the PROTECTION of KING DAVID [n.].' 

f DAVII>, by the grace of God, King of Scots, to the bishops, abbots, 
earls, barons, justiciars, sheriffs, and other officers of our kingdom 
clerical and lay, health everlasting in the Lord.' It behoves the royal 
majesty * to cherish in peace, tranquillity, and quiet the religious who 
devoutly serve God, and to protect, defend and preserve with pious 
devotion their rights, liberties, and privileges, which were granted by 
some of his progenitors, the Kings of Scotland. After an inspection of 
the Charters of the Abbot and Convent of Lundors granted by his 
predecessors, he understood fully that the monks, their monastery, their 
men, lands and possessions wherever they were throughout the kingdom, 
their goods, and all other rights possessed by the monks, were under 
the patronage and royal majesty of the Kings of Scotland, with no 
intermediary. Following in the footsteps of his predecessors he took 
under his protection, patronage, jurisdiction, and royal majesty, \vith no 
intermediary, the monastery, men, lands, and possessions of the monks, 
and declared that they were not subject to, nor ought to recognise, any 
other so far as related to title of superiority, claim, or secular exaction, 
although the monastery and the monks were founded of old by Earl 
David, brother of William, of revered memory, King of Scotland, his 
[King David's] predecessor, and endowed by him with divers lands and 
possessions in divers parts of the kingdom. ' Wherefore we signify and 
declare to all of you by the tenor of these presents that although we 
have transferred and granted by charter to our cousin, Thomas, Earl of 
Mar, our land of Garvyach, coming to us by right, it neither was nor is 
any part of our intention or will to transfer to the Earl of Mar himself, 
or to any other, the said religious, their monastery, their lands, rents, 
or possessions wherever they may be, which pertain to us without an 
intermediary, or to renounce, separate, or alienate them from the title 
of the royal majesty.' Wherefore he strictly forbids the Earl of Mar 
or any other whomsoever to molest or disturb the monks and their 
possessions by reason of, or under pretext of, any gift or grant made, or 
to be made, in any way by him, or to raise any question in law against 
the will and intention of the royal majesty, to the no small prejudice 
and grievance of the king's state. For such action they would be liable 
to the king's full forfeiture, and the loss of all which they could lose to 



1 Or, as we should now say, ' the king's majesty.' 



THOMAS, EARL OF MAR 199 

the king. On the contrary they are to permit the monks to use and 
enjoy freely and quietly the liberties, privileges, possessions, and other 
easements of all kinds which had been granted by him or his predecessors. 
The King's Seal. ' At Edynburgh, on the 15th of December, in the 
twenty-ninth year of our reign.' * 



CXLVIII 

De Contrauersia inter nos et dominum Thomam 
Comitem de Mar. 

OMNIBVS hoc scriptum visuris vel audituris Thomas | conies de [foi. 19.] 
Marre et dominus de Garvyach, salutem in domino sempiter- 
nam. Nouerit vniuersitas vestra quod licet nuper quesiverimus 
et petiverimus a religiosis viris abbate et monachis monasterii 
sancte marie et sancti andree apostoli de Limdors, Sancti 
Andree dyocesis, homagium,fidelitatem, sectas et compariciones 
ad curias nostras, sicut a ceteris libere tenentibus nostris de le 
Garvyach, racione terrarum quas predicti religiosi tenent et 
possident infra le Garviach, nunc vero alio modo de veritate 
informati et de eorum libertatibus ad plenum instructi, 
predictos religiosos et eorum terras ad predicta onera nobis vel 
successoribus nostris prestanda pro nobis, heredibus nostris 2 vel 
successoribus nostris recognoscimus in nullo fore obligatos ; Et 
istud omnibus quorum interest vel interesse possit pro nobis, 
heredibus, et successoribus nostris tenore presencium manifesta- 
mus. In cujus rei testimonium hoc presens scriptum sigillo 
nostro magno autentico muniri fecimus penes predictos religio- 
sos perpetuo remansurum. Datum apud castrum nostrum de 
Kyldromy, decimo nono die mensis Augusti, Anno domini M 
ccc mo quinquagesimo nono. 

(Abstract) 

' OF the DISPUTE between us and the LORD THOMAS, EARL of MAR.' 

THOMAS Earl of Mar, and Lord of Garvyach, makes known to all that 
although he had lately sought and claimed from the abbot and monks 
of Lundors, in the diocese of St. Andrews, homage, fealty, and suits 
and compearances in his courts, as from the other free-holders of the 
Garviach, by reason of the lands which the aforesaid religious held and 

1 That is, 1 5th of December, 1357. 

2 This word ' nostris ' is subpunctuated in MS. as a sign that it should be 
omitted. 



200 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

possessed within the Garviach, yet now, having- heen informed as to the 
truth, and being- fully instructed as to their liberties, he acknowledges 
that the aforesaid religious and their lands are in no way under obligation 
for the burdens aforesaid due to him, his heirs, and successors. By the 
tenor of these presents he declares this for himself, his heirs, and 
successors, to all whom it may, or could, concern. 

In testimony of this he has caused the present writ to be fortified by 
his Great Seal. The writ was to be kept in the custody of the said 
religious. ' Given at our castle of Kyldromy, on the nineteenth day of 
the month of August, in the year of our Lord MCCCLIX.' 



CXLIX 
Dauid Comes de Hunthyngton. 1 

DAVID Comes de Huntinetoune [frater] regis Willelmi fun- 
davit Abbathiam de Lundores et dedit et concessit deo et 
beate marie et monachis ibidem Deo servientibus, in liberam, 
puram, et perpetuam elemosinam, post certas terras et ecclesias, 
ultra month Fyntre, et in Garvyach Lethgawyl et Malynd 
cum pertinenciis suis et concessit eisdem decimam omnium 
lucrorum et placitorum suorum infra terrain suam et extra, 
ultra month, quam habuit tempore donacionis illius Et decimam 
omnium rerum suarum et heredum suorum scilicet decimacionem 
bladi et farine, butiri et casii, carnis et venacionis, cibi et potus, 
coriorum ferarum cum mota canum captarum, et salis, uncti et 
cepi, et omnium aliarum rerum que decimari possunt et que 
dabuntur, vel vendentur, vel ad firmam ponentur, de maneriis 
suis vltra month. Et voluit et concessit vt predicta ecclesia 
de Lundors et monachi habeant et teneant omnia predicta in 
liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosinam, de se et heredibus 
suis, cum omnibus libertatibus suis 2 et liberis consuetudinibus 

1 This legal opinion on a disputed point of law has presented more difficulties 
of transcription than the whole of the rest of the Chartulary. In some places 
the ink has so far faded as to render the script illegible. In other places the 
references to the mediaeval commentators on the Civil and Canon Law are given 
in such an abbreviated form that much perplexity has been caused. The 
endeavour has been to present the text with the utmost possible accuracy. But 
it is obvious that even after the best endeavours of the editor, the text is, in 
some places, corrupt. In the Notes and Illustrations, the passages of the Civil 
and Canon Law and of the Commentators, who are referred to, are exhibited so 
far as they have been identified. 

2 The word ' suis ' is subpunctuated. 



A LEGAL OPINION 201 

sine omni seruicio et consuetudine et auxilio et secular! 
exaccione, bene et in pace, integre et honorifice, sicut aliqua 
abbathia in toto regno Scocie melius et liberius, quiecius et 
honorificencius aliquam elemosinam tenet et possidet, et ita 
libere sicut ipse eas vmquam tenuit et habuit, Et ita libere et 
pacifice vt nullus sibi succedencium aliquid ab eis nisi solas 
oraciones ad anime salutem exigere presumat. Teste Willelmo 
rege Scottorum. 

Et Rex Willelmus concessit et confirmauit predicta omnia 
et vtitur uerbo concede eis etc., et sciant presentes et futuri me 
dedisse et concessisse et hac carta mea confirmasse, etc. Et 
concedo eciam eisdem monachis vltra month fyntreth et 
ecclesiam eiusdem ville, et in garvyach Lethgawylle et malynde, 
ita vt prenominati monachi predicta omnia in terris et ecclesiis 
ad proprios vsus et sustentaciones habeant et teneant : Et 
concedo eis cuream suam omnino liberam, et dignitatem pacis, 
sine omni seruicio et consuetudine et auxilio et seculari 
exaccione, in liberam etc. Et subdit in fine, ita vt nullus 
heredum | prefati comitis, fratris mei, a predictis monachis [fol- 20.] 
quicquid nisi solas oraciones ad anime salutem exigere presumat. 
Et sic interpretatur verbum succedencium in carta comitis 
Dauid. Post istam donacionem religiosi isti possidebant omnia 
ista pacifice in libera regalitate, confirmata et priuilegiata per 
sedem apostolicam, absque exaccione seculari per tempus et 
tempora viuente ipso Dauid comite, et Johanne de Scotia, filio 
suo, et tribus sororibus et eorum filiis, quibus demum successit 
recolende memorie Rex Dauid Scocie vterinusf iure sanguinis 
et propinquitatis qui terram de Garvyach dedit consanguineo 
suo Thome, comiti marrie, cum libere tenentibus, bondagiis, et 
seruiciis, et ita libere in omnibus et plene, vt dicitur, sicut Dauid 
comes de Huntynton ipsam habuit vel tenebat. Qui dominus 
comes marrie petiuit ab ipsis religiosis compariciones et sectas, 
fidelitatem et homagia, et super istis vexauit: set demum 
informatus ad plenum de eorum libertatibus, vt asserit, ipsos 
religiosos et eorum terras ad predicta onera sibi vel successoribus 
suis prestanda pro ipso, heredibus, vel successoribus suis recog- 
nouit in nullo fore obligatos ; Et hoc pro se et heredibus suis 
vel successoribus manifestat per suas literas patentes vniuersis de 
anno domini millesimo [ccc] 1. ix. Et dictus dominus Dauid 



202 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Rex Anno regni sui xxix suscepit istos religiosos, monasterium 
suum, homines, terras et possessiones vbicumque infra regnum 
scocie existentes, sub sua proteccione, patronatu, iure et regia 
magestate, [njullo medio, et recognoscit fore subiectos, Nolens 
quod ipsi alium quemcumque, quo l superioritatis titulum, 
clameum, vel exaccionem secularem, preter ipsum recognoscerent, 
licet ipsi fuerint ab antique per comitem Dauid de diuersis terris 
et possessionibus dotati, et significat et declarat quod quamuis 
a MS. et. ipse terram suam de Garvyach sibi iure obuenientem in a 

consanguineum suum dominum Thomam, comitem marrie, 
transtulit, Intencionis sue seu voluntatis non extitit dictos 
religiosos homines, suas terras, vel redditus ab eo abdicare, 
Inhibens ne predictus comes de marre vel quicumque alius, 
racione cuiuscumque donacionis per ipsum facte quouismodo 
seu faciende in futurum, predictos religiosos homines, suas 
terras vel possessiones vbicumque infra regnum suum existentes, 
molestare vel inquietare presumat super suam plenariam foris- 
facturam, ac sub pena omnium que erga ipsum amittere quoquo 
modo [poterit]. Isti comiti marrie succedit dominus comes de 
Duglas, et petit quod isti religiosi recognoscant eum vt patronum 
suum, et heredem quondam comitis Dauid, et prestent sibi 
obsequia que ipsi comiti Dauid prestare tenebantur, et inter 
cetera petit fidelitatem nominatim, et ostensionem cartarum 
suarum in curia sua. Et processum fecit per tres dies contra 
[fol. Zl.~\ ipsum abbatem sicut contra tenentes alios, quo processu | stante 
et valido, promisit abbas die proxima assignanda per dictum 
comitem, ut in quarto die processus, comparere et facere que in 
quarto die facere tenebatur: quo die comparuit et dictum 
dominum comitem disclamauit, et dominum nostrum regem 
inuocauit, et de curia comitis sic recessit. Et comes postea terras 
in manu sua fecit recognosci, quas idem abbas a domino nostro 
rege infra tempus debitum peciit debite restitui. Qui ipsum 
restitui mandauit plene et integre ad easdem modo queritur, ex 
quo d ictus comes Dauid eis terras istas et ecclesias in puram et 
perpetuam elemosinam etc. et quod sint libere ab omni 
seruicio, consuetudine, et exaccione temporal! . Et Rex Wil- 
lelmus ista nominatim confirmauit ymo magis donauit; et 
eciam concessit et quod teneatur de comite Dauid amiserit, 

1 The MS. reads ' quo' ; but compare 'quantum ad ' in CXLVII. 



A LEGAL OPINION 203 

ipsique religiosi domino regi inseparabiliter et continue adhesi- 
rint, sibi soli et nulli alii fidelitatem facientes per triginta 
annos et amplius. An Comiti fidelitatem facere teneantur, et 
videtur quod non, quia vassallus non cogitur pro uno feodo plures 
dominos habere : nota Hostien. in summa ; de feu. c ultimo 
v. set numquid tenebitur: et iste terre de Garviach in una 
carta cum aliis et post alias terras et sub eadem data eis donata a a So in MS. 
fuerint, pro quibus omnibus dominum nostrum regem recogno- 
verunt per xxx ta annos et ultra, et hodie recognoscunt, et sibi 
pro eis fidelitatem fecerunt et faciunt, igitur alii pro eis fideli- 
tatem facere non debent, nee pro aliis terris ab eis per xxx ta 
annos pacifice possessis, quia pro eis domino nostro regi 
servicium debitum exhibuerunt in cujus manu tanto tempore 
fuerunt: nam in li. feu orum ti. si de feu. de defunct, fuerit, c. 
si quis coll. x., dicitur si quis per xxx annos rem aliquam 
in feudum possedit et servicium domino exhibuit, quamvis de ea 
re nuncquam investitus sit, prescriptione tamen xxx annorum 
poterit se tueri. Si enim prescriptus-f* libertatis contra domi- 
num in libertate sua tuendus erit. C. de episcopis et cleri. li. 1. 
et sufficit in talibus prescripcio xxx annorum : habetur eciam in 
libro feudorum de feu. dato invicem legis commissor. c. quid 
obligavit. Cum enim libertas favorabilis sit, de facili prescripsit 
contra servitutem, de privilegiis c. cum olim, per, et c. ex ore, 
fi. non sit e contra c. de prescrip. contra libertatem et non 
adversus libertatem, 1. fi. et pretores fovent libertatem, ff. de 
alienacione, iuii. mdi. ca. facta, 1. iij. i. Rex eciam Wil- 
lelmus hoc videtur voluisse quia ubi comes David dixit Quare 
volo et concede ut predicta ecclesia de Lundoris et monachi 
ibidem deo servientes habeant et teneant in liberam etc. de 
me et heredibus meis prenominatas terras ita libere etc, Idem 
rex Willelmus omittit, ut videtur scienter, hec verba de me et 
heredibus, et dixit ut prenominati monachi omnia supradicta 
in terris et in omnibus aliis ad proprios usus et sustentaciones 
| suas habeant et teneant. Item toto tempore post funda- \.f l > ** 
cionem ipsius monasterii quotiens terra de Garviach erat extra 
manus dominorum regum Scocie semper isti religiosi regi et nulli 
alii adheserunt, tanquam superiori et domino immediate et 
sibi fidelitatem fecerunt. Item si fidelitas aliqua pro ipsis terris 
esset debita, videtur ipsis per pactum factum a comite et a rege 



204. THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

remissa, quia feodum invenitur sine fidelitate in libro feu. 
quantum fiat investitura, c. nulla, et invenitur feodum liberum 
et immune unde communiter dicitur, Ego teneo hoc castrum 
in feodum liberum et de tali non tenetur quis facere nisi 
simplicem recognicionem, nota Hostien. in summa de 1 . . .etc. 
generaliter in quartum versum, set contra, versus finem versus. 
Set comes et rex concedit terras sine omni servicio et exac- 
cione seculari in liberam etc. ut 1 modo fidelitas est 

servicium quo videtur esse remissa quia subdit quod nullus 
michi succedencium etc. Item quia dominus sine voluntate 
vassalli feodum alienare non possit, nee vassali in generali 
alienacione concurrent, nisi hoc nominatim dictum sit. Azo. cujus 
fuit hoc quoad decimam quod sicut vassallus invito domino 
feodum alienare quomodo tales alienatas cadit a feodo 2 



per fredericum c. inperialem . Preterea ducatus, et ita 
t3 pe. de bel. per. quemadmodum, nee jus filiacionis transferri 
possit invito filio, fF. de adop. 1. ij. idem Hostiensis de ma. 
et obe. dilecti, in locuturaf , et in summa de feu. ult. vers. set 
nequit, et spe. ti. de feu i. vers. xxix ; et hoc verum est de jure 
quo rex eos invitos alienare non potuit. Item dato quod rex 
alienasset terrain de Garviach cum tenentibus, tamen clerici sub 
nomine libere tenencium non essent comprehensi, per id quod 
legitur et notatur de privilegiis ex parte abbatisse juxta ver. 
clerum et populum, nam cum clerus et populus sint diverse 
professionis xij. q. 1. duo, xcvj. di. duo: xix. q. 1. due de ma. 
et obe. solite, in expressione unius alius non continetur facit c. 
si sentencia interdict! de sen. ex. li. vj : et licet transtulisset 
clericos, monachi tamen non essent comprehensi, nam clerici et 
monachi sunt re et nomine diversi, ne cle. et mo. in R C1S xvi. q. 
1. legi. Item rex David suam donacionem interpretatus fuit 
et declaravit expresse quod illos religiosos vel terras eorum 
non transtulit in comitem marrie quod sibi licuit, quia unde 
jus prodiit interpretacio juris procedere debet de sen. ex. inter 
alia: de judi, cum venissent; et beneficia principalia principes 
solent interpretari, notatur per fc. et alios, suggestum de Dec. 
Et comes Marrie dotarius pro se, heredibus suis, ac succes- 
1 Illegible. 2 Several lines illegible. 



A LEGAL OPINION 205 

soribus, manifestat predictos religiosos ad compariciones, sectas, 

vel fidelitatem sibi vel suis successoribus non teneri, que | [/&/. 23.] 

manifestacio liabet vim siuef quia facta fuit cum cause cogni- , 

7 Nota de viij 
clone : nota doctorum in c. n. de rescnp. h. vj : et non solum Marcis quas 

declaravit, set in satisfactionem vexacionis et injurie eis ilia- SsaSfac- M 
tarum annuam pensionem octo marcarum de terris de Flandir tionem dedit 

nobis de 

in hberam et perpetuam elemosmam eis constituit, et omnia Flandres. 
ista morte defuncti confirmatur post quod tempus non penitet 
heres. C. fami. hercisde v. films. Et si dubium esset, tarn favore 
elemosine etc. tain favore devocionis grate quam favore reli- 
gionis esset talis interpretacio facienda, quia in donacionibus 
ad elemosinam et pro remedio animarum plenissima est interpre- 
tacio facienda : nota Ho. c. dilecti de doncs. Item dominus 
comes de douglas intravit et peciit jure comitis marrie qui 
recognovit se nullum jus habere loquendo de terris istis et de 
oneribus debitis racione eorum, et iuri coherent! cause et rei re- 
nunciavit, ergo nomine suo vel petere possit in regis jure ; nemo 
plus juris etc. Item sicut approbat conquesicionem factam de 
terra de Garviach per comitem marrie, Ita recognicionem de 
istis non sibi debitis approbare debet, alias non debet consequi 
beneficium per ipsum cuius factum studet multipliciter iripug- 
nare, c. cum olim de sensi [censi], cum ibi notatis per doctores. 
Quia quod aliquis approbat pro se tenetur recipere contra se : 
c. iiij. q. iij. si quis testibus. Item non est patronus quia ius 
patronatus est potestas representandi insti tuendum ad benefi- 
cium simplex et vacans, set Ho. in summa i,alio modo dicitur 
ius patronatus quod acquiritur ex manumissione proprii serui fF. 
de iure patronatus in 1. i. secundum Hostien. neutro modorum 
istorum est ipse patronus ergo etc. Item est heres qui in vniuer- 
sum ius defuncti succedit et talis vocatur sucessor iuris, fF. de he 
insti. 1. quociens hered. ; et excepcio que competebat contra 
defunctum competet contra talem successorem. fF. de contra, ep. 
1. dolia fi. nota et Dynus in r a iuris si quis in ius succedit cum 
ibi notatis, set defuncto obstaret talis excepcio, nee possit 
dominus comes de Douglas aliud excipere quia habet titulum 
lucratiuum et vtitur a successione re ex persona a[u]ctoris, vt 
fF. de do. ma. et metus excep. 1. apud celsum de a[u]ctoris. 

Item donatarius et alij legatarij siue in rem successors credi- 
toribus non respondent, in 1. quociens, C. de hered. insti., ergo 



206 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

loco heredum non habentur, quia heredes tenentur pro defunct! 
debitis respondere, ergo non respondent ut heredes qui heredes 
non sunt. Cum igitur dominus Comes de Douglas quo ad 
comitem de Huntyngtoune sit donatarius et non successor in 
totum iusdefuncti,sequitur clare quod non est heres,nec obsequia 
[fol. 24.] |spiritualia sibi vt heredi sunt prestanda. Et cum sit successor 
vniuersalis comiti marrie qui informatus et cum cause cognicione 
ista declarauit ad se non pertinere, cuius morte ista confirmatur, 
sic quod non possit heres penitere, et dominus comes de Douglas 
habeat titulum lucratiuum et vtitur a succession e re ex persona 
a[u]ctoris sicut ista excepcio repelleret comitem Marrie si 
viueret, Ita repellat dominum comitem de Douglas qui vtitur 
iure suo, et cuius factum non debet impugnare, ex quo magnum 
fructum consequitur ab eodem. 

Item quia dominus rex Dauid declarauit expresse se istas vel 
alias eorum possessiones non transtulisse in comitem marrie et 
acciones personaliter alicui competentes eciam re alienata, cuius 
nomine competunt apud eundem remanent ; ff. de accio. et obli. 
v. quecunque, et ff. de furtis v. inter omnes. 

Item in generali alienaccione vassalli non continentur inuitis 
vassallis, et maxime minori domino, sicut nee ius filiacionis 
inuito filio, et licet tenentes venissent clerici non venirent, et 
licet clerici non monachi. Et cum vna carta et donacione 
vnica ipsi habeant istas possessiones et omnia alia loco vnius 
feudi, et pro vno feudo vassallus plures dominos non cogitur 
habere, et per cclx annos regi fidelitatem fecerint et nulli alii, 
et sic rex ipsos prescripserit,et hoc voluit rex Willelmus, sequitur 
quod ab inpeticione comitis sunt absoluendi. Ista causa non 
solummodo pro libertate monasterii facit set exprimit ius 
regium, et corone regie iusticiam tuetur ne in regem monasterii 
lesio redundat, in c. cum olim. ij. fi. de priuilegiis; spe. ti. ti. de. 
actore, versus, Item illustris p a et in ti. de reo vs, Item consul etc. 
Item cum feud urn invenitur sine fidelitate, vt per pactum 
remissa, et liberum et immune, et hec concedantur in liberam 
etc. et sine omni seruicio et exaccione seculari non obstat si 
comes dicat quod ius agendi personale in rem scriptum transit 
in singularem successorem sine cessione, vt ff. de aqua plu. ar. 1. 
si tertius si quis prius; et res transit cum sua causa in c. ex 
literis de pig. et de decs, cum non sit, quia hie nullum ius est 



A LEGAL OPINION 207 

scriptum speciale in terris istis set obsequium prestandi oraciones 
que ad animariim salutem debetur heredi vniuersali, et est 
scriptum in tota successione non in re singular!, nee obstat 
quod dicitur abbas approbauit processum ibi processu trium 
dierum stante vt valido, quia non approbauit processum set 
ordinem procedendo non inpugnauit, et ibi ly vt non est 
veritas expressum set propter similitudinem facti aliqua 
numerantur inter ea de quorum numero non sunt ; xxvij. q. i. 
quotquot ; notatur inc. nuper de biga. 

(Abstract) 
f DAVID, EARL of HUNTHYNGTON.' 

[NOTE. The document here inscribed in the pages of the Chartu- 
lary, like that which follows it (CL.), differs wholly in character 
from the general contents of the volume. It is simply the opinion 
of a skilled ecclesiastical lawyer on a disputed point of law. Such 
documents are not very common among the ecclesiastical remains of 
Scotland in the mediaeval period ; and that which is now before the 
reader is interesting, not only for the subject matter dealt with, but as 
affording a very full specimen of the form and style in which such legal 
opinions were drawn up. The opinion is manifestly the work of one 
who was well versed in the civil as well as in the canon law, and who 
was familiar with the writings of several of the most eminent of the 
mediaeval j urists. 

The numerous references to the Pandects, the Codex of Justinian, the 
Decretals of Gregory ix., and the great legal commentators, have been 
mostly identified, and they will be found dealt with in the Notes and 
Illustrations. In the following Abstract it has not been thought neces- 
sary to give these references, and the aim has been to exhibit the 
argument, leaving the authorities cited to be examined by the curious. 
That the reader may understand the situation it may be explained that 
David n. had given (see CXLVII.) the lands of Garioch to his cousin, 
Thomas, Earl of Mar. Mar had at first claimed from the abbot and 
monks of Lindores, as from his other freeholders in Garioch, homage, 
fealty, and compearance and suit at his courts (see CXLVIII.); but on 
learning the facts of the case more fully, he formally acknowledged 
that the abbot and monks were under no obligation for any of the 
observances claimed as being due to him, his heirs, and his successors. 
To the Earl of Mar succeeded the Earl of Douglas, who renewed the 
claim in the form that the abbot and monks should recognise him as the 
heir of Earl David, and that to him they should render the observances 
which had been due to Earl David, and more particularly, that they 
should render fealty to him, exhibit their charters in his court, and 



208 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

recognise him as their ' patron.' This claim not being admitted,, the 
earl took proceedings (processum fecit) against the abbot, the proceed- 
ings extending over three days. And while the action was still pending 
(processu stante et valido) the abbot 'promised that on the next day 
assigned by the earl as the fourth day of the action he would compear 
and do all that he was bound to do on the fourth day.' On the fourth 
day the abbot appeared, and immediately 'disclaimed the earl,' and 
appealed to the king (dominum nostrum regem invocavit), and thereupon 
departed from the earl's court. Afterwards the Earl of Douglas caused 
the lands held by the monks to be, in the language of feudal law, 
' recognosced in his hand,' that is, forfeited by the monks and resumed 
into his possession as superior. Thereupon the abbot, within the legal 
limit of time, sought from the king to be restored in full to the lands. 
The king, responding to the claim of the abbot, ordered the lands to be 
restored, inasmuch as the founder of the abbey, Earl David, had given 
the lands and churches in Garioch to the monks 'in free, pure, and 
perpetual alms, and free from all service, custom, and temporal exaction,' 
and because King William had in express terms confirmed all their 
rights in these respects, and because the monks had done fealty to the 
king and to none other for thirty years and more. This narrative being 
premised, the reader will be in a better position to understand the 
arguments of the legal adviser of the monks in replying to the query 
put to him, 'Are the monks bound to do fealty to the Earl of Douglas ? '] 

The opinion begins with a recitation at length of the pertinent parts 
of Earl David's Great Charter (n.), and of the confirmation of Earl 
David's grants by King William (cxxxvm. ), noticing in both that nothing 
was to be demanded from the monks but prayers for the weal of 
souls. Our lawyer also points attention to the fact that while in Earl 
David's charter it was said that 'none of my successors' should demand 
anything save prayers, King William in his confirmation says that ' none 
of the heirs of the said earl, my brother,' should demand anything save 
prayers. And the lawyer argues that we have in this change of phrase 
an interpretation of how the word ' successors ' was to be understood. 

It is next stated that after the donation of the lands of Garioch the 
monks held them in free regality (in libera regulitate), confirmed and 
privileged by the Apostolic See. And so they held them during the 
lifetime of Earl David, of his son, John of Scotland, and of his three 
sisters and their sons, to whom at length succeeded King David [n.] by 
right of blood and kindred. King David gave the land of Garioch to 
his cousin, Thomas, Earl of Mar, with its freeholders, villeinages (bonda- 
giis), and services, as freely and fully in all things as David, Earl of 
Huntington, had and held it. 

It is next related that the Earl of Mar claimed from the monks com- 
pearance and suit at his courts, fealty, and homage. He, however, 
when he was fully informed, as he alleged, respecting the liberties of 
the monks, acknowledged that they were in no manner obliged to the 



A LEGAL OPINION 209 

burdens (oneru) aforesaid, and publicly declared the same for himself, 
his heirs, and his successors, by ' his letters patent to all/ dated in the 
year 1359 (see CXLVIII.). 

King David [n.], in the twenty-ninth year of his reign (1357), (see 
CXLVII.) had taken the monks, their monastery, and their possessions 
throughout Scotland, under his protection, patronage, right, and royal 
majesty, without any intermediary (nullo medio), declaring that the monks 
should recognise no claim of superiority in any one save himself. He 
further declared that although he had transferred his land of Garioch to 
his cousin, the Earl of Mar, he did not surrender (ab eo abdicare) the 
said monks, their lands, or rents. He further forbade the Earl of Mar 
and all others to disturb the monks by reason of any grant made, or to 
be made, by the king, hereafter, under pain of full forfeiture. 

The Earl of Douglas succeeded to the Earl of Mar as lord of the land 
of Garioch ; and his claims and his action towards the abbot and monks 
of Lundors is then recited (as related in the preliminary Note). The 
abbot's appeal to the king, and the king's restoration of the lands to the 
monks, are then recounted. After which follows the question, ' Are the 
monks bound to do fealty to the earl ? ' 

The answer is, 'It seems that they are not bound.' And the reasons 
for this opinion are set forth at great length. (1) A vassal is not 
compelled to have more lords than one for one fee (vassalus non cogitur 
pro uno feodo plures dominos habere). Now the land which the monks 
held in Garioch was given to them in one charter, and so was to be 
regarded as one fee. And for thirty years and more (actually, as stated 
in a later part of the opinion, for no less than two hundred and sixty years) 
the monks had recognised no other feudal superior than the king, and to 
him only had done fealty ; therefore they were not bound to do fealty to 
another. (2) But, again, it is laid down in the Feudal Law (Consuetudines 
Feudorum) that if any one holds anything in fee and renders due service 
to the superior, or lord of the fee, for thirty years, he was to be defended 
in his possession by prescription, even though he had never been in- 
vested. And King William seems to have recognised this kind of 
possession by the monks of their land of Garioch, for where Earl David 
had said that the monks were to hold the lands ' of him and his heirs,' 
the king in his confirmation of the grant omits these words, and declares 
that the monks were to hold the lands for their own use and mainte- 
nance. (3) Again, during the whole time while the lands of the monks 
in Garioch were 'outside the hands of the Kings of Scotland,' that is, 
after the lands had been transferred to the Earl of Mar, the monks had 
adhered to none but the king, and done fealty to him as immediate 
superior. (4) Again, even supposing that fealty was due in its own 
nature from the lands, yet it would seem that fealty had been remitted 
by the agreement (per pactum) made by Earl David and by the king. 
In the feudal law it is recognised that there may be ' a fee without 
fealty,' and what is called a ' fee, free and exempt ' (feodum liberum et 

o 



210 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

immune), which gives rise to such a common expression as ' I hold this 
castle in free fee.' And in such cases the holder is not bound to any 
obligation save simple recognition, that is, acknowledgment of the 
superior. But this agreement seems indicated by Earl David and King 
William granting the lands in free alms, without any service and secular 
exaction. But fealty is a ' service/ and it seems to have been remitted 
by the clause which prescribed that none of the successors of the Earl 
David should presume to exact anything from the monks save only 
prayers for the weal of the soul. (5) Again, it is recognised in feudal 
law that a feudal lord cannot alienate a fee if the vassal who holds the 
fee is not a consenting party. Nor can vassals be held to concur in a 
general alienation, unless they concur expressly and by name. (6) 
Again, let it be assumed, for the sake of argument, that the king had 
alienated the land of Garioch ' with its tenants,' yet the word ' tenants ' 
occurring in the charter must not be held to include the ' clergy.' This 
it is sought to establish by passages where the ( clergy ' are distinguished 
from the ' people.' And even had the word 'clergy' occurred in the 
charter, it could not be inferred that ' monks ' were included, for monks 
and clergy are distinct both in name and in fact. (7) Again, King 
David [n.], when transferring the lands to the Earl of Mar, interpreted 
his own gift by expressly declaring that he had not transferred the monks 
and their lands to the earl, and this is in accord with the maxim that 
' from whence the law proceeds the interpretation of the law ought to 
proceed,' and again, 'Princes are wont to interpret princely benefac- 
tions.' (8) Again, the Earl of Mar himself, the donee (dotarius), 
acknowledged for himself, his heirs, and his successors, that the religious 
of Lundors were not bound to render compearance, suit, or fealty ; and 
this was done after a full knowledge of the question in dispute. And 
not only did he make the declaration, but, as satisfaction for the vexation 
and injury caused the monks by his making the claim, he even agreed 
to pay to the monks an annual pension, in perpetual and free alms, of 
eight marks out of his land of Flandir. All this was confirmed by the 
death of the Earl of Mar, for after the death of him who bequeaths, 
according to the legal maxim, ' the heir cannot repent,' that is, the heir 
cannot alter the disposition of the property as he has received it. Even 
if there were doubts as to the contention of the ' opinion,' yet the favour 
shown to the grants of alms, the favour shown to devotion, and to the 
monastic life, indicate that such an interpretation ought to be made, 
for in the matter of gifts of alms, and for the relief (remedio) of souls, 
the most ample and favourable interpretation is to be allowed. (9) 
Again, the Earl of Douglas entered heir to the land of Garioch, and 
made his claim on the monks of Lundors, grounded on the right which 
the Earl of Mar had possessed. But the Earl of Mar had acknowledged, 
when speaking of those lands and of the burdens due by reason of those 
lands, that he had no right. Can the Earl of Douglas then in his own 
name, or by right of the king, make this claim ? In the words of the 



A LEGAL OPINION 211 

rule of law, ' No man can transfer to another a larger right than he had 
himself.' 1 

(10) Again, as the Earl of Douglas assents to the acquisition of the 
land of Garioch made by the Earl of Mar, he ought to assent to the 
acknowledgment that these obligations were not due from the land. 
Otherwise he ought not to enjoy the benefit of the land, on the ground 
of the possession of which he seeks to make various attacks on the rights 
of the monks. ' Because what any one assents to when it is in his favour 
he is bound to receive when it makes against him.' (11) Again, the 
Earl of Douglas is not the patron of the monks of Lundors, as he claims, 
for the right of patronage is the power of presenting any one for institu- 
tion to a simple benefice when vacant. In another sense of the words, 
' right of patronage ' is said to be acquired by the manumission of one's 
own slave (as in the Pandects). But in neither of these ways is the Earl 
of Douglas a patron, therefore his claim falls to the ground. (12) 
Again, an heir is one who succeeds to the whole right (jus) of one 
deceased, and as such is called successor of right (successor juris) \ and 
an exception which is competent against the deceased is competent 
against such a successor. But such an exception was objected to the 
deceased Earl of Mar, and the Earl of Douglas cannot make another 
exception in law because he has a ' lucrative title,' that is, a title by 
bequest, bringing a gain with it. And the principle is illustrated by the 
case of a purchaser using a purchase which the seller had obtained by 
fraud (as discussed in the Pandects), in which case the purchaser is liable 
to suffer loss. (13) Again, a donee and other legatees are not responsible 
to creditors in the matter of the property which has come to the 
successor in law. Therefore donees are not to be accounted as heirs, 
because heirs are bound to answer for the debts of the deceased. Those 
who are not heirs are not responsible as if they were heirs. Since 
therefore the Earl of Douglas is, as regards the Earl of Huntington, a 
donee and not a successor to his whole right (successor in totum jus 
defuncti), it follows clearly that he is not an heir, nor is there any 
obligation to render to him the spiritual observances (obsequia spiritualia) 
that were due to the heir. And since the Earl of Douglas was universal 
successor to the Earl of Mar, who on full information acknowledged 
that the services he had claimed were not due by the monks, it is plain 
that he, as his successor, cannot make this claim ; nor ought he to 
impugn the Earl of Mar's action since he reaps great advantage from the 
succession. 

The ' opinion ' then sums up and repeats the arguments which had 

1 I have ventured on the supposition that the words 'nemo plus juris, etc.,'' 
indicate the passage from Ulpian, which will be found in the lib. 1. tit. xvii. 
of the Digest, and run, ' Nemo plus juris ad alium transferre potest, quam ipse 
kaberet.' I do not see how the words ' ergo nomine,'' etc., can be construed 
unless we suppose them to be a question, the answer being in the words ' Nemo 
plus juris, etc.' 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

been already set forth, and then adds that this view of the case not 
only makes for the liberty of the monastery, but expresses the royal 
rights, and defends the just claims of the crown, which would suffer 
injury by the harm which would be inflicted on the monastery in 
admitting the claim of the Earl of Douglas. 

The Earl of Douglas cannot contend that he is entitled to raise the 
claim on the ground that a personal right conveyed by writ is trans- 
ferred to a singular successor, inasmuch as in this case there is no 
special right conveyed by writ in respect to these lands, except the 
obligation on the part of the monks of offering prayers, which prayers 
are due to the universal heir (heir general) ; and in the written charters 
it is to the general succession, not to a succession of a part, that this 
obligation refers. 

Nor can an objection be raised on the ground that the abbot acknow- 
ledged the validity of the Earl of Douglas's processes at law by appear- 
ing at the earl's court, because he in no way assented to the process 
at law, though he did not impugn the order of the proceedings. 1 



CL 
[/>' **] Casus. 

MONASTERIVM de Lundors, diocesis Sancti Andree, habens 
quasdam ecclesias parrochiales infra dioceses de A. de B. 
sibi vnitas, de quibus abbas et conuentus eiusdem recipiunt 
grosses fructus, videlicet decimas garbales ad utilitatem mona- 
sterii sui, que quidem ecclesie in se habent curatos per abbatem 
et conuentum etc Episcopo presentatos, et per ipsum receptos, 
et ad curam et administracionem earundem admissos, ut moris 
est in ceteris. 

quero. Hie queritur si abbas de Lundoris, Sancti Andree diocesis, ad 

Synodos episcoporum A. et B. venire teneatur racione ecclesia- 
rum supradictarum, et eisdem episcopis obedienciam et alia 
facere que episcopo pertinent, Videtur quod sic : per c. conque- 
rente de off. Ord et c. quod super hiis de ma. et ob. xviij q. ii. c. 

1 This abstract (omitting all the references to the Corpus Juris Civilis, the 
Corpus Juris Canonici, and the legal commentators, which will be found, so far 
as they have been identified, in the Notes and Illustrations) gives substantially 
the argument of the legal expert who drew up this opinion. It will be observed 
that the opinion goes beyond the question of the Earl of Douglas's claims upon 
the monks as their assumed feudal superior. It contends that even the prayers 
for the weal of the soul which were due by the monks to the heirs of Earl David 
were not due to one who was not an heir, nor a successor general. 



ANOTHER LEGAL OPINION 213 

Abbates. Contrarium tamen verum esse videtur, per jura alle- 
gata que intelliguntur de Episcopo in cujus diocesi situatum est 
monasterium de L. et infra quam d ictus Abbas populmn habet 
et administracionem, Et non sic in casu proposito, quia mona- 
sterium de L. infra diocesim Sancti Andree, nee ejusdem Abbas 
infra diocesas A. et B., nee populum nee administracionem 
habet unde teneri videtur etc. Item nee quisquam ad Synodum 
alicujus episcopi venire tenetur nee eidem juramentum facere 
nisi qui sub eodem euram animarum vel rerum ecclesiasticarum 
administraeionem habet : ut c. nullus, de jurejurando: xxiij. di. 
c. quamquam, xxii. qu. ultima, . ultimo. Et cum dictus 
Abbas de L. infra dioceses A. et B. nee populum nee adminis- 
tracionem set nee ullam curam habere videtur unde ad hujus- 
modi non tenetur : ut xviij q. ultima canonicam et 
juribus allegatis. Item omnes religiosi in favorem religionis 
videntur esse exempti, xviij. q. ultima. canonicam allegat 
xviij. di. c. Episcopus etc. ex ore sedentis, de privilegio in fi. 
c. dilectus, de off. ord. glo. ii. circa medium. Set raeione 
administracionis perpetue et populi quern habent abbates et 
prelati alii religiosi, subsunt episcopo loci et ad hujusmodi 
tenentur : ut c. quod super hiis de ma. et ob. xviij. q. ii. 
Abbates et sic hujusmodi non habentes non tenentur : et cum 
venire et alia hujusmodi facere sunt onerosa et odiosa restrin- 
genda sunt, de ilia regula juris Ii. vj. odia etc. Item, si dicatur 
quod quamvis ecclesia cum clericis suis ita exempti sint quod 
non veniant ad Synodum nee excommunicari vel interdict non 
possunt, tamen si aliquis clericorum loci illius privilegiati 
aliam ecclesiam parrochialem, curam et populum habentem, 
obtineat, per hoc subest episcopo loci, et posset in eum suam 
jurisdiccionem exercere non obstante privilegio suo, non obstat 
hoc casui isti. Item, ad hoc quod quis ad Synodum venire 
teneatur et episcopo alia incumbeneia facere requiritur quod 
eidem subsit aut lege diocesana aut lege jurisdiccionis in 
quibus legibus totum jus et potestas et episcoporum consistit, 
ut c. dilectus, de off. ord. cum suis notatis, set abbas de L. 
quavis raeione monasterii sui recepit decimas garbales qua- 
rundem ecclesiarum parrochialium in diocesi A. et B., nee 
episcopis earundem propter hoc subest lege diocesana, quia 
monasterium de Lundors de quo est abbas est diocesis Sancti 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Andree, quod est manifeste verum, nee idem abbas eisdem 
episcopis subesse videtur lege jurisdiccionis quia nullam curam, 
nullam administracionem, locum, vel populum infra dioceses 
A. et B. habet dictus Abbas propter que eisdem episcopis 
subesse videtur, aut qua racione in persona sua jurisdiccionem 
habere possit quisque eorum. 

Et hoc potissime cum ecclesie parrochiales infra dictas 
dioceses, monasterio de L. annexe, in se habent curatos qui 
subsunt episcopo loci qui ad modum patrie dicuntur vicarii, set 
pocius veri rectores sunt; ut c. suscepti re. de preb. li. vj, qui 
ad Synodum veniunt, episcopo respondent, obediencias et alia 
incumbencia pro et de ipsis ecclesiis episcopo faciunt, in quibus 
si velit possit episcopus suam jurisdiccionem communem 
exercere, et per hos rectores episcopo per abbatem et conven- 
or 0&] turn | presentatos, per ipsum ad earum curam receptos et 
admissos, exoneratur abbas de L. Et si non exoneratus esset 
sequeretur in quociens et daretur religiosi evagandi extra 
claustrum, materia quod contrarium est religioni et jure satis 
prohibitum. Non negatur tamen quin episcopus de istis 
ecclesiis possit ab abbate caritativum subsidium petere : secun- 
dum quod jure traditur c. conquerente, de off. ord., nisi 
privilegio fulciantur. 

(Abttract) 

NOTE. This, like Charter CXLIX., is a legal opinion on a disputed 
question. The passages of the Canon Law referred to will be found in 
Notes and Illustrations. The letters C.J.C. = ' Corpus Juris Canonici,' 
have been inserted in square brackets to indicate where references to the 
Canon Law occur. 

<A CASE.' 

( THE monastery of Lundors, in the diocese of St. Andrews, has united 
to it certain parish churches within the dioceses of A[berdeen] and 
B[rechin], from which parishes the abbot and convent of the same 
receive the great fruits (grossus fructus), to wit, the garbal tithes, for 
the use of their monastery. The parish churches have in them curates 
[i.e. vicars perpetual with cure of souls], who have been presented to 
the bishop by the abbot and convent, and, having been received by him, 
have been admitted to the cure and administration of the same, as is the 
custom elsewhere.' 

It is now inquired : ' Is the Abbot of Lundors, in the diocese of St. 
Andrews, bound to attend the synods of the Bishops of A. and B., and 
render obedience and the other dues that belong to the bishop?' 

It seems that he is bound so to do. [C.J.C. ] 



ANOTHER LEGAL OPINION 215 

Yet the contrary seems to be true. For the laws just alleged are to 
be understood of the bishop in whose diocese the monastery of L. is 
situated, and within which diocese the abbot has his people and adminis- 
tration. But it is not so in the case proposed. For the monastery of 
L. is within the diocese of St. Andrews, and the abbot of the same 
has neither his people nor administration within the dioceses of A. 
and B. 

Again, no one is bound to attend the synod of any bishop or to take 
the oath [of canonical obedience] to him, unless he has, under that 
bishop, cure of souls, or the administration of things ecclesiastical 
[C.J.C.]. And since the said Abbot of L. has neither people, nor 
cure, nor administration, within the dioceses of A. and B. he is not 
bound. 

Again, all religious seem to be exempt, by reason of the favour shown 
to religion [C.J.C.]. But by reason of a perpetual administration 
and of the people which they have, abbots and other monastic prelates 
are subject to the bishop of the place and are bound to the duties of the 
kind in question [C.J.C.], and abbots who have no such people or 
administrations are not bound. 

And since to attend synods and perform the other things mentioned 
are ' odious and onerous,' they are to be restrained by the rule of law 
[C.J.C.]. 

Again, if it be said that, although the Church with its clerks are 
exempt, so that they need not come to the synod, nor are liable to be 
excommunicated or interdicted by the bishop, yet if any of the clerks of 
the privileged place should obtain another parish church which has 
people and the cure of souls, he on that account is subject to the bishop 
of the place, who is able to exercise his jurisdiction over him, not- 
withstanding his privilege, such a statement raises no obstacle in 
this case. 

Again, those who are subject to a bishop and bound to attend his 
synod and perform duties to the bishop, are so bound and subject either 
by diocesan right or by the right of jurisdiction [C.J.C.], in which two 
rights all the right and power of a bishop consists [C.J.C.]. But the 
Abbot of L., although by reason of his monastery he receives the garbal 
tithes of certain parish churches in the dioceses of A. and B., is yet not 
subject to the bishops of the same, on that account, by diocesan right, 
since, as is manifestly true, the monastery of which he is abbot is in the 
diocese of St. Andrews ; nor is he subject to the bishops by the right of 
jurisdiction, because he has no cure, administration, place, or people 
within the dioceses of A. and B. on account of which he might seem to 
be subject to those bishops, or by reason of which either of them could 
have jurisdiction over his person. 

And this is more especially true in the present case, because the parish 
churches within the said dioceses, which have been annexed to the 
monastery of L., have in them those admitted to the cure of souls 



216 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

(curatos), who are subject to the bishop of the place. These are called, 
after the manner of this country, f vicars,' but more truly they are 
f rectors/ [C. J.C.] ; and these attend the synod, answer to the bishop, 
render obedience, and perform the other things incumbent, for and of 
the said churches. On these rectors the bishop, if he wishes, can 
exercise his common jurisdiction, and by reason of these rectors, received 
and admitted to their cure by the bishop, the Abbot of L. is exonerated 
from attendance, etc. 

But if the abbot is not exonerated it follows that cause would be given 
for a religious wandering outside his cloister [in attending the synods], 
which is contrary to monastic rule (quod contrarium eat religion?), and is 
sufficiently prohibited by law. Yet it is not denied that the bishop is 
entitled to claim, on account of these churches, a 'benevolence' (cari- 
tativum subsidium) from the abbot, according to the law [C.J.C.]. 

CLI 

Carta terre seu tenement! quondam Magistri 
Thome Rossy jacentis in nouo burgo. 

IN del nomine, Amen: per hoc presens publicum instrumentum 
cunctis pateat evidenter quod anno ab incarnacione ejusdem 
millesimo quadringentesimo septuagesimo octavo, die vero 
mensis Februarij septimo, indictione xij, pontificatus Sanctis- 
simi in Christo patris et domini nostri, domini Sixti divina 
providencia pape quarti, anno octavo, In mei notarii publici et 
testium subscriptorum presencia personaliter constitutus dis- 
cretus vir Magister Thomas Rossy, vicarius ecclesie parochialis 
de Inchestur, Sancti Andree diocesis, tanquam vir multum 
prudens, et anime sue ferventer cupiens et ardenter, ut apparuit, 
salubriter providere salutem, veraciter sperans et confidens 
quod per pias oraciones et missarum celebraciones peccata 
dimitti, purgatoriique penas molliri et ab eisdem defunctorum 
animas frequencius liberari et ad gaudia paradisi feliciter 
deduci: Hinc est quod dictus Magister ipse Thomas, non vi 
aut metu ductus nee coactus, nee per aliquem, prout asseruit, 
circumventus, set ex sua certa sciencia et spontanea voluntate pie 
devocionis affectu commotus, ob omnipotentis dei et gloriose 
virginis marie, matris ejus, ac omnium sanctorum laudem 
et honorem, et ob anime sue proprie, necnon bone memorie 
quondam dompni Jacobi de rossy, olim abbatis de Lundoris, 
sui auunculi precarissimi et omnium fidelium defunctorum 



GRANT BY THOMAS ROSSY 217 

[salutem], sponte voluit, dedit, concessit, nominavit, et a corde 
donavit, ac presentis instrument! per tenorem vult, dat,concedit, 
nominat, et pro perpetuo irreuocabiliter donat venerabilibus et 
Religiosis viris, suppriori et conuentui dicti monastery modernis, 
et eorum successoribus in parte augmentacionis suarum petanci- 
arum, prius, vt Religiosus vir, frater Andrea Wynton, tune tem- 
poris huius loci predicti su[p]prior, affirmauit, speciali licencia 
eorum magistri et abbatis ad hoc petita et obtenta, et integras 
terras suas cum quadam domo lapidea sumptibus et expensis 
ipsius magistri thome, vt asseruit, sicut stat constructa et 
erecta, cum earundem vniuersis pertinenciis infra nouum 
burgum ex parte boreali et ad finem orientalem eiusdem, inter 
terras Stephani caluart ad occidentem ab vna et terras arabiles 
dicti monasterij ad orientem partibus ab altera jacentes ; Que 
quidem terre cum pertinenciis prius erant pro dicto monasterio 
et sibi dicto magistro Thome, prout publice et palam ibidem 
fatebatur et cum effectu affirmabat, ad edificandum et constru- 
endum dictam domum, pro suo vsu, vtilitate, et quiete, durante 
tern pore vite sue, ex speciali gracia et non alias concesse et 
donate extiterunt ; Tenendas et habendas totas dictas terras et 
domum cum pertinenciis suis suppriori et conuentui modernis 
et eorum successoribus in dicto monasterio nunc et futuris 
ternporibus existentibus, in puram et perpetuam elimosinam, 
in omnibus commoditatibus, libertatibus, asiamentis, ac iustis 
suis pertinenciis qnibuscunque ad predictas terras et domum 
cum pertinenciis spectantibus seu iuste spectare valentibus 
quomodolibet in futurum, in feodo et hereditate inperpetuum, 
adeo libere, quiete, plenarie, integre, honorifice, bene et in pace 
sicut alique terre siue domus cum pertinenciis in regno scocie 
dantur aut conceduntur siue poterunt dari vel concedi in 
puram et perpetuam elimosinam liberius, quiecius, plenarius, et 
integrius, honorificencius, melius, seu pacificencius, sine quacun- 
que contradiccione aut reuocacione aliquali ; Reseruato tamen 
sibi ipsi magistro Thome et saltio remanente pro toto tempore 
vite sue dictarum terrarum et domus cum pertinenciis libero 
tenemento, Ita quod dicti supprior et conuentus pro tempore 
suo et eorum successores qui pro tempore fuerint teneantur 
et stricte obligentur semel in quolibet anno futuris perpetuis 
temporibus, videlicet in die anniuersarij dicti quondam domini 



218 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Jacob! sui auunculi, vnam missam specialem de requiem 
solempniter cum nota, et uigilias mortuorum cum ix lectionibus 
in nocte precedente deuote, in ecclesia monasteriali apud 
magnum altare, pro anima ipsius dicti Thome, necnon anima 
dicti sui auunculi, et animabus omnium defunctorum cele- 
brare et indesinenter perficere, et inperpetuum inuiolabiliter 
obseruare. Tuncque et incontinenter idem frater andrea, sup- 
prior predictus, ad omnia predicta perimplenda et deuote 
annuatim, vt premittitur, perficienda onus pro se et conuentu 
moderno, durante tempore suo, et pro eorum successoribus 
sponte in se assumpsit, ac fideliter et deuote ad perficienda 
absque fictione promisit. Super quibus omnibus et singulis 
dictus supprior nomine suo et conuentus predicti et dictus 
magister Thomas hinc inde a me notario publico sibi peci- 
erunt publicum seu publica instrumentum sen instrumenta. 
Acta erant hec apud dictum burgum et infra predictam domum, 
hora quasi 3 a post meridiem, anno, die, mense, indiccione, et 
pontificatu quibus supra. Presentibus ibidem Alexandro spens 
de Pettincreffe, domino Valtero Anderson, Jacobo Philp cum 
diuersis aliis, ad premissa vocatis specialiter et rogatis. 

(Abstract) 

' CHARTER of the LAND, or HOLDING, of the late Master THOMAS ROSSY, 
which is situated in NEWBURGH.' 

IN the name of God. Amen. By this present public instrument let 
it be plainly known to all men that in the year from the Incarnation of 
the same MCCCcLxxvm., 1 on the eighth day of the month of February, 
Indiction xii., in the eighth year of the pontificate of our most Holy 
Father and Lord in Christ, Lord Sixtus iv. , by divine providence, Pope, 
in the presence of me, notary public, and of the witnesses underwritten, 
compeared in person, the discreet man, Master Thomas Rossy, vicar of 
the parish church of Inchestur, in the diocese of St. Andrews, as being 
a very prudent man, and earnestly and eagerly desirous, as appeared, to 
provide in wholesome wise for the weal of his soul, hoping in truth and 
trusting that by pious prayers and the celebration of Masses sins were 
remitted, the pains of purgatory mitigated (molliri), and that from the 
same the souls of the departed were very frequently liberated and happily 
carried to the joys of Paradise. Hence it is that the said Master Thomas 
himself, not led or compelled by force or fear, nor, as he alleged, 

1 That is, as the number of the Indiction shows, 1478-9. 



GRANT BY THOMAS ROSSY 219 

circumvented by any, but of his own assured knowledge and spontaneous 
wish, moved by the impulse of pious devotion, to the praise and honour 
of Almighty God and of the glorious Virgin Mary, His Mother, and of all 
saints, and for the weal of his own soul, and of the soul of his dearest 
uncle, the late James de Rossy, of good memory, formerly Lord Abbot 
of Lundoris, and the souls of all the faithful departed, of his own accord 
willed, gave, granted, named, and gifted from his heart, and, by the 
tenor of this present instrument, wills, gives, grants, names, and for 
ever irrevocably gifts to the venerable religious, the present sub-prior 
and convent of the said monastery, and to their successors, to the end 
that their pittances might be increased, having first obtained the special 
leave of their master and abbot (as the religious, Brother Andrew 
Wynton, at that time sub-prior of the place aforesaid, affirmed), the whole 
of his lands, together with a house built and erected of stone at the cost 
and charges of the said Master Thomas, as he asserted, with all the 
pertinents of the same, within Newburgh at the northern part and at 
the western bound of the same, lying between the lands of Stephen 
Calvart on the one side to the west, and the arable lands of the said 
monastery to the east on the other side. 

These lands with their pertinents had been formerly granted and given 
by special favour for the said monastery and for himself, the said Master 
Thomas, as he publicly and openly acknowledged and effectively 
affirmed, for the building and constructing of the said house, for his 
use, service, and convenience (quiete), during his life. They were now 
given to be had and held with their pertinents by the present sub-prior 
and convent, and by their successors, in pure and perpetual alms, with 
all their conveniences, liberties, easements, etc., in fee and heritage, as 
freely, quietly, fully, perfectly, honourably, well, and in peace, as any 
lands or houses in the kingdom of Scotland are given or granted, or 
could be given or granted, in pure and perpetual alms, most freely, 
fully, etc., without any gainsaying or revocation, yet reserving and 
saving to himself, the said Master Thomas, for his whole life, the 
freehold of the said lands and house with their pertinents. But on the 
condition that the said sub-prior and convent, and their successors, shall 
be strictly bound once every year in all future time, on the day of the 
anniversary of the late abbot, his uncle, to celebrate one special Mass of 
requiem, solemnly, with music (cum nota), 1 and, on the night preceding, 
the vigils of the dead with nine lessons, in the church of the monastery, 
at the great altar, for the soul of the said Thomas, the soul of his uncle, 
and the souls of all the faithful departed. 

Whereupon, immediately the same Brother Andrew, the sub-prior 
aforesaid, readily took upon him, for himself, the convent, and their 
successors, the burden of fulfilling all the above premises, and gave his 
sincere promise to this intent. Upon which, all and singular, the sub- 
prior, in his own name and the name of the convent, and the said Master 

1 That is, the Mass was to be sung. 



220 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Thomas, each, severally, craved from me, notary public, a public instru- 
ment, or public instruments. 

These things were done at the said burgh, and within the aforesaid 
house, at about the third hour after noon, the year, day, month, 
indiction, and pontificate, as above. Present Alexander Spens of 
Pettincreffe, Sir (domino) Walter Anderson, James Philp, with divers 
others specially called and summoned for the purpose (ad premissa). 



CLII 

\_foi. 27.] De Nouo Burgo. 

VNIVEUSIS sancte matris ecclesie filiis ad quorum noticias pre- 
sentes litere peruenerint, Johannes permissione diuina abbas 
monasterii sancte Marie de Lundoris, ordinis beati benedicti, 
sancti Andree diocesis, et eiusdem loci conuentus, salutem in 
omnium saluatore. Et quia cartis et munimentis infeodacionis 
nostrorum burgensium noui burgi per guerras, ignem, vel alia 
mundi discrimina negligenter distructis et peremptis, Ideo 
continuis precibus et crebris instanciis, pro innovacione infeo- 
dacionis dicti burgi cartarumque suarum reformacione, predict! 
burgenses sepissime et indefesse per se ac per nonnullos alios 
probos ac circumspectos viros nobis, tanquam eorum dominis 
superioribus, humiliter institerunt et supplicarunt, Nos vero 
prefati abbas et conventus tandem attendentes et pie conside- 
rantes supplicaciones eorum continuas fore justas et racioni 
consonas, capitulari tractatu, consilioque mature ac unanimi 
deliberacione prehabitis, necnon commodo et utilitate dicti 
nostri monasterii in omnibus prepensatis, dictis nostris burgen- 
sibus et suis heredibus innovacionem infeodacionis antedicte, 
unacum cartarum et munimentorum suorum reformacione 
meliori modo quo poterimus de novo duximus concedendam. 
Noverit igitur universitas vestra nos prefatos abbatem et con- 
ventum unanimi consensu et assensu dedisse, concessisse, et 
confirmasse, ac presentis nostre carte tenore dare, concedere, et 
confirmare dilectis et fidelibus nostris burgensibus, suis heredi- 
bus et successoribus dictum nostrum burgum inhabitantibus, 
habentibus, et possidentibus, et pro perpetuo inhabitaturis et 
possessuris, ac temporibus profuturis legittime intrantibus et 
intraturis predictum novum burgum, et omnia et singula sua 



CHARTER GRANTED TO NEWBURGH 221 

tenementa, tarn in fronte quam in cauda, cum omnibus justis 
suis pertinenciis, solitis et consuetis, pure et simpliciter in 
liberum burgum, et forum in eodem cum libera et plenaria 
facultate emendi et vendendi victualia, vinum, ceram, pannos 
lineos et laneos, lanam, carnes, pisces, pelles, coria, ac illas et 
ilia fruniendi, piscandi, brasiandi ; ballivos, serjandos, ac alios 
officiarios quoscunque creandi, eligendi, continuandi, depo- 
nendi, et in eorum locis alium vel alios singulis annis eligendi et 
statuendi, curias tenendi, leges burgales exercendi, statuta 
racionabilia condendi, transgressores debite puniendi, et si opus 
fuerit eosdem expellendi, amerciamenta levandi, mercimonia 
quecunque propinandi, liberandi, et mensurandi, ac omnia alia 
et singula, actus et officia, de jure et consuetudine dictum bur- 
gum concernencia, faciendi et exercendi, nundinas infra dictum 
burgutii die Sancte Katrine Virginis annuatim proclamandi 
et tenendi, eschaetas et amerciamenta exinde | levandi, exigendi, \.f l - 
et recipiendi, et delinquentes in eisdem debite puniendi, 
cum omnibus aliis et singulis libertatibus, commoditatibus, et 
asyamentis prefato burgo de jure vel consuetudine pertinentibus, 
et quas nos possidemus et illis concedere valemus secundum 
formam et tenorem carte serenissimi principis quondam, bone 
memorie, regis Alexandri nobis et nostris successoribus super 
dicto burgo, caritatis intuitu, graciose concesse in nostrisque 
archivis conservate : Tenendum et habendum dictum nostrum 
novum burgum cum omnibus suis pertinenciis in liberum 
burgum, et forum in eodern, quolibet die martis singularum 
ebdomadarum cujuslibet anni, et inperpetuum nostris predictis 
burgensibus et suis heredibus ac successoribus de nobis et suc- 
cessoribus nostris in feodo et hereditate inperpetuum, Adeo 
libere, quiete, plenarie, honorifice, bene, et in pace sicut nos et 
predecessores nostri possedimus et babuimus, per omnes et 
singulas suas antiquas metas rectas et di visas, et aliis suis justis 
pertinenciis quibuscunque dicto novo burgo spectantibus, sen 
de jure spectare valentibus quomodolibet in futurum, Et tarn 
liberius et quiecius sicut aliquis burgus consimilis infra regnuni 
Scocie datur, conceditur, seu quovismodo possidetur, predicti 
vero burgenses, sui heredes, et successores faciendo nobis et 
successoribus nostris homagium et tres sectas curie in anno ad 
tres curias capitales nostras apud dictum burgum tenendas. 



222 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Necnon et prefati burgenses sui heredes et successores reddendo 
nobis et successoribus nostris annuatim firmas burgales, videlicet ; 
vj. denarios monete currentis pro qualibet virgata sen perticata 
terre ad terminos solitos et consuetos : Reservando nobis et suc- 
cessoribus nostris omni anno itinera justiciarie et camerarie 
unacum custumis in dicto burgo contingentibus. Item volumus 
quod nullus extraneus extra dictum burgum moram trahens 
exceptis heredibus legitimis in burgensem recipiatur seu admit- 
tatur nisi prius ad hoc noster consensus expresse requiratur et 
eciam optineatur. In cujus rei testimonium sigillum commune 
capituli nostri apud dictum nostrum monasterium, hora capitu- 
lari, vicesimo quarto die mensis Maij, Anno domini M. cccc. 
quinquagesimo septimo, presentibus est appensum, etc., 
quodff. R. K. 

(Abstract) 

' OF NEWBURGH.' 

To all the sons of Holy Mother Church to whose notice the present 
letters shall come, John, by divine permission abbot of the monastery 
of St. Mary of Lundoris, of the order of Blessed Benedict, in the diocese 
of St. Andrews, and the convent of the same place, greeting in the 
Saviour of all men. Inasmuch as the charters and muniments of infeft- 
ment of our burgesses of Newburgh have through negligence perished, 
and been destroyed, by wars, fire, and other hazards of this life (alia 
mundi discrimina), and inasmuch as the burgesses aforesaid by continual 
prayers and frequent and urgent intreaties have by themselves, and by 
other good and circumspect men, with unwearied persistence humbly 
urged and supplicated us, as their lords superior, for a new infeftment 
of the said burgh, and the renewal (reformations) of their charters, we 
the aforesaid abbot and convent at length giving ear to them, and con- 
sidering that their continual supplications were just and agreeable to 
reason, after discussion in our chapter, and mature counsel, and 
unanimous deliberation, having carefully weighed what concerned the 
convenience and advantage of our monastery, have judged that a renewal 
of the infeftment aforesaid should be granted to our said burgesses and 
their heirs, together with the renewal (reformatione) of their charters 
and muniments, in the best way in our power. Be it known therefore 
to all of you that we, the aforesaid abbot and convent, have by unanimous 
consent and assent, given, granted, and confirmed, and by the tenor of our 
present charter, give, grant, and confirm, to our beloved and faithful 
burgesses, their heirs, and successors, inhabiting our said burgh, who 
have and possess or shall hereafter have and possess, or shall in time to 
come lawfully enter the said Newburgh, their holdings, all and singular, 
as well in front as in rear (in cauda) with all their just pertinents, usual 



CHARTER GRANTED TO NEWBURGH 

and accustomed, purely and simply, as a free burgh, and a market in 
the same with free and full power of buying- and selling victuals, wine, 
wax, linen and woollen cloth, wool, flesh, fish, skins, and hides, and of 
tanning the skins and hides, of fishing, and of brewing. They shall 
have also full and free power to make and elect bailiffs, sergeants, and 
other officers, to continue them, depose them, and in their places to 
elect and appoint one or more ; to hold courts ; to administer burgh 
laws ; to enact reasonable statutes ; to duly punish offenders, and, if 
need be, to expel the same ; to levy fines ; to expose for sale, weigh, and 
measure merchandise of all kinds, and to do and exercise all other and 
singular acts and offices which by law or custom affect the said burgh, to 
proclaim and hold every year, on the feast of St. Katherine the Virgin, 
[Nov. 25] a fair within the said burgh, to levy, exact, and receive 
escheats and fines therefrom, and to duly punish delinquents in the 
same, together with the other liberties, conveniences, and easements, 
all and singular, which'by right or custom pertain to the aforesaid burgh, 
and which we possess and are capable of granting them, according to the 
form and tenor of the charter of the late most serene prince, of good 
memory, King Alexander, which, at the prompting of love, was 
graciously granted to us and our successors anent the said burgh, and 
which is preserved in our archives. Our said Newburgh to be held and 
had with all its pertinents as a free burgh, and the market in the same 
every Tuesday of each week throughout the year, and for ever, by 
our aforesaid burgesses and their heirs and successors, of us and our 
successors, in fee and heritage for ever, as freely, quietly, fully, 
honourably, well, and in peace, as we and our predecessors possessed 
and had it by all and singular its ancient right meiths and marches, and 
with its other just pertinents of every kind pertaining to the said New- 
burgh, or which can of right pertain to it in any way in future, and as 
freely and quietly as any like burgh within the realm of Scotland is 
given, granted, or possessed, the said burgesses, their heirs, and suc- 
cessors doing homage to us and our successors, and making three suits 
of court in the year at our three head-courts to be held within the said 
burgh, and also the said burgesses, their heirs, and successors, rendering 
to us and our successors yearly at the usual and customary terms the 
burgh rents, to wit, six pence of the current money for every rod or 
perch of land, reserving to us and our successors the justice and 
chamberlain ayres, together with the customs pertaining in the said 
burgh. Likewise we will that no stranger (extraneus) from outside the 
said burgh, tarrying there [?], should be received or admitted as a 
burgess (lawful heirs excepted) unless our consent thereto is expressly 
sought and also obtained. 

In testimony of which thing the common seal of our chapter was 
attached to the presents, at our said monastery, at the hour of the 
chapter, on the twenty-fourth day of the month of May, in the year of 
our Lord MCCCCLVII., etc. 

'Quodff. R. K.' 



224 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

CLIII 

\_foi. %.} Instrumentum Saysine terre quondam Magistri 
Thome Rossy Jacentis in nouo burgo. 

IN del nomine, Amen, per hoc presens publicum instrumen- 
tum cunctis pateat evidenter quod anno ab incarnacione ea- 
dem millesimo quadringentesimo septuagesimo nono, die vero 
mensis Martii vicesimo sexto, indictione duodecima, pontifi- 
catus Sanctissimi in Christo patris ac domini nostri, domini 
sixti divina providencia pape quarti, anno octavo in plena 
curia burgali novi burgi tenta apud ipsum burgum, infra capel- 
lam ejusdem, per probos viros, Michaelem de Inch et Ale- 
xandrum Michelsen dicti burgi ballivos, comparuit discretus vir 
Magister Thomas Rossy, vicarius ecclesie de Inchthur, Sancti 
Andree diocesis, qui nee metu ductus nee coactus, nee in aliquo 
errore, ut asseruit, lapsus, set ex sua certa scientia ac mera et 
spontanea voluntate universas et singulas terras suas et domum 
suam lapideam desuper constructam et erectam, cum earundem 
pertinenciis vniuersis infra dictum burgum ex parte boreali 
eiusdem, inter terras stephani caluart ad occidentem ab vna, et 
terras arabiles dominorum abbatis et conuentus monasterii de 
Lundoris ad orientem partibus ab altera Jacentes, in manibus 
predictorum balliuorum per tradicionem cuiusdam parue 
virgule sursum dedit, pureque et simpliciter resignauit ; saluo 
tamen sibi dicto magistro thome dictarum terrarum et domus 
cum pertinenciis pro toto tempore suo libero tenemento. 
Quaquidem resignacione, sic, ut premittitur, facta et admissa, 
prefati balliui, finita dicta curia, ad dictas terras et domum 
cum pertinenciis, recto tramite, vnacum me notario publico et 
testibus subscriptis, accesserunt, et ibidem Michael, balliuus pre- 
dictus,de dictis terris et domo cum earundem pertinenciis statum 
et saisinam hereditariam Religiosis viris fratribus Andree 
Wyntoun, suppriori dicti monasterii, et Johanni Cambal, 
monachis eiusdem loci professis, tanquam veris et legittimis 
procuratoribus pro toto conuentu eiusdem monasterii in 
prefata curia per dictos balliuos ad hoc specialiter admissis, 
secundum formam dicte resignacionis et tenorem carte per 
dictum magistrum thomam eis desuper confecte, per terre et 



SASINE OF LAND IN NEWBURGH 225 

lapidis in eorum manibus donacionem, vt moris est in burgo, 
saluo iure cuiuslibet, tradidit et deliberauit, ac eosdem procura- 
tores nomine et ex parte tocius dicti conuentus in realeni 
actualem et corporalem possessionem traduxit, et realiter 
inuestiuit de eisdem : Super quibus omnibus et singulis pre- 
fatus supprior, nomine et ex parte tocius dicti conuentus, a me 
notario publico infrascripto sibi fieri peciit vnum seu plura 
publicum vel publica Instrumentum seu Instrumenta. Acta 
erant hec anno, mense, die, Indiccione, locis, et pontificatu 
quibus supra hora vndecima vel eocirca ante meridiem, presenti- 
bus ibidem dicto magistro thoma, Johanne Wrycht, Stephano 
criikschank, Patricio Coule, Jacobo Philip, Nicholao Grynlaw, 
Dauid arbroth, Alano arbroth, Thoma Wyntoun, Jacobo Kok, 
Johanne Wemis et Willelmo Zung, cum diuersis aliis testibus, 
ad premissa vocatis specialiter et rogatis. 

(Abstract) 

1 INSTRUMENT of SASINE of the LAND of the late MASTER THOMAS ROSSY, 
lying in NEWBURGH/ 

IN the name of God. Amen. By this present public instrument let 
it be clearly manifest to all that in the year of the same Incarnation 1 
one thousand, four hundred, and seventy-nine, on the twenty-sixth day 
of the month of March, the twelfth indiction, the eighth year of the 
pontificate of our Most Holy Father and Lord in Christ, the Lord 
Sixtus iv. by Divine Providence, Pope, in the full burgh-court of New- 
burgh, held at the same burgh, within the chapel of the same, by the 
good men Michael of Inch and Alexander Michelson, bailiffs 2 of the said 
burgh, compeared the discreet man, Master Thomas Rossy, vicar of the 
church of Inchthur, in the diocese of St. Andrews, who not led nor 
forced by fear, nor, as he asserted, having fallen into any error, but of 
his certain knowledge and pure and spontaneous inclination, gave back 
into the hands of the aforesaid bailiffs by the delivery of a small twig, 
and purely and simply resigned, all and singular his lands and his house 
of stone erected and built thereon, with all pertinents of the same 
within the said burgh, at the northern part of the same, lying between 
the lands of Stephen Calvart and the arable lands of my lords the abbot 
and convent of Lundoris to the east, yet saving to himself, the said 
Master Thomas, the freehold of the said lands and house with their 

1 The text reads ab incarnacione eadem, but compare the opening of CLI., 
where we find the reading ab incarnacione ejusdem. 

2 The word ' bailies ' would in this Charter represent perhaps more nearly the 
officer meant. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

pertinents for the whole of his time. On the resignation being- made 
and admitted^ as stated above, the aforesaid bailiffs, on the said court 
having been finished, went by the straight road, together with me, 
notary public, and the witnesses underwritten, to the said lands and 
house with their pertinents, and there Michael, the bailiff aforesaid, 
gave and delivered, by the giving of earth and stone into their hands, as 
the custom is in the burgh, state and heritable sasine of the said lands 
and house with the pertinents of the same to the religious, Brothers 
Andrew Wyntoun, sub-prior of the said monastery, and John Cambal, 
being professed monks of the same place, as to true and lawful pro- 
curators for the whole convent of the same monastery, specially admitted 
by the said bailiffs in the aforesaid court, for this purpose, according to 
the form of the said resignation and the tenor of the charter executed 
thereanent by the said Master Thomas, and put the same procurators in 
the name and on the part of the whole said convent, into real, actual, 
and corporal possession, and gave them real investiture of the same. 
On which things, all and singular, the aforesaid sub-prior, in the name 
and on the part of the whole said convent, craved of me, the notary 
public underwritten, that a public instrument or public instruments 
should be made for them. These things were done in the year, month, 
day, indiction, places, and pontificate as declared above, at the eleventh 
hour, or thereabouts, before noon. There being present at the same place 
the said Master Thomas, John Wrycht, Stephen Crukschank, Patrick 
Coule, James Philip, Nicholas Grynlaw, David Arbroth, Alan Arbroth. 
Thomas Wyntoun, James Kok, John Wemis, and William Zung, with 
divers other witnesses specially called and summoned to the premisses. 



CLIV 

\_foi. i.-\ [Fragmentum Instrument! Public!. 1 ] 

IN Dei nomine amen ; per hoc presens publicum instrumen- 
tum cunctis secunda Indictione vij a pontificatus 

sanctissimi in christo patris ac domini nostri 
et testium subscriptorum presencia personaliter constitute 
discretus uir du singulos procuratores suos super 

consilii infrascripta potestate cum predictam 

permittandi Reuocando et quos extunc Reuocantur 
de Butyll, archidiaconum candide case, sacri palacij. 2 

1 After some hesitation the editor has added this, which is an unintelligible 
fragment of a notarial instrument, apparently used as a fly-leaf. The end of 
each line is wanting. See Notes and Illustrations. 

2 A word follows here which cannot be deciphered. See Notes and Illustra- 
tions. 



FRAGMENT OF NOTARIAL INSTRUMENT 227 

Carrie Ricardum Cady et dominum Johannem de 
auchynleke a actores factores et negociorum suorum 

gestores d.d. resigna parochialem de Kynnetlys 

predictam quam secundum fac 
Roberto de Dryden, Rectore dicte ecclesie de mukart, in 

supradicti uel alterius cuiuscunque ab eodem 
monasterio propria ac in ipsius constitucionis 

animam iurandum et juramentum 
niaca prauitas uel illicita pactio Et generaliter 

si particulariter interesset eciam si talis hue 
que in iudicum . . . stipulanti tanquam persone publice 

et nomine omnium a aliquis in premissis duxerit 
faciendum sub ypotheca singulis premissis 

Idem dominus hugo a me notario publico 

Sancti Andree sub anno die mense Indiccione et pontificatu 
supradictis Glasguen. et Brechynen. canonico Johanne Scheues 
. . . sancti andree diocesis ecclesiarum Rectoribus Johanne de 
Cameron vocatis et requisitis in 

testimonium omnium et singulorum 
[Signum Notarii,] Et ego Willelmus. . . . 

[FRAGMENT of a PUBLIC INSTRUMENT. 

NOTE. The sense of this fragment cannot be gathered, the document 
having been cut lengthwise, so that the latter part of each line is wanting. 
Indeed it seems highly probable from the discoloration of the parchment 
that the leaf had been at one jtime pasted down on the oaken board 
which formed the front cover of the little volume. The verso side is 
blank. Some conjectures as to some of the persons named will be found 
in the Notes and Illustrations. One of them was, almost certainly, at a 
later date, Bishop of Galloway.] 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

The Notes with the initials [A.G.] added are from comments furnished by 
Mr. Alexander Gibb, F.S.A. SCOT. 



Date. This may be determined as between 1178 and 1182. Of the 
witnesses, Hugh was appointed Bishop of St. Andrews not earlier, at 
least, than 1178 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.), while Earl Waldeve (Earl of 
Dunbar) died in 1182 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). 

Page 1. Probis hominibus. The familiar phrase probi homines is perhaps 
to be understood as signifying e the smaller tenants-in-chief.' See Rait's 
Scottish Parliament, p. 15. 

Comitatum de Leuenaus. f Alwyn, second Earl of Lennox, being 
very young, William i. gave the ward of the Earldom of Lennox to 
David, Earl of Huntingdon and Garioch' (Douglas, Peerage, ii. 81). In 
Scotichronicon (lib. ix. cap. 27) we do not find Lennox mentioned among 
the grants made by William to Earl David. It is there said that after 
returning from his captivity in England (1175) King William gave to 
his brother David the earldom of Huntingdon and the earldom of 
Garioch, with the lordship of Strathbolgi, the royal vill of Dundee, 
together with Inverbervy and the lands of Langforgrund, with other 
wide and spacious lands and possessions. On the other hand the same 
authority elsewhere (lib. ix. cap. 33) when recording Earl David's death 
describes him as f Earl of Huntingdon, of Garioch, and of Lennox.' 
And the comparison of the two entries falls in with a late date (such as 
that of our charter) for the donation of Lennox. We learn (Registr. 
Monast. Passelet, pp. 166-168) that when Earl David held and possessed 
the earldom of Lennox, he sought to obtain an aid from the lands of the 
church of Kilpatrick, as from the other lands of the earldom, but he 
could not obtain it as these lands were defended by the Church. 1 
' Leuenaus' is an unusual form of the more common 'Leuenax' or 
' Leuenaux. ' We find ' Lovenaus ' in the list of nobles who were parties 



1 Alwyn must have been satisfied with his royal master's treatment, for he 
makes a gift to the church of Campsie for the weal of the souls of King William 
and Queen Ermengarde. [A. G.] 



230 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

to the treaty for the marriage of the Maid of Norway (Palgrave's 
Documents (Scotland), i. 32). 

Dunde. This, so far as the editor is aware,, is the earliest notice of 
Dundee in authentic history. 

Forgrund. This is presumably the ' Langforgrund ' in the account of 
the grants made by King William to Earl David as given in Scotichron. 
(lib. ix. cap. 27). If this identification is correct the Forgrund of this 
charter (which is in the Carse of Gowrie) is to be distinguished from the 
Forgrund (Forgandenny) near Exmagirdle, of No. LXVIII. 

Petrnothel. This name seems to have disappeared. ' Mothel ' or 
1 Moethel' (the modern Muthill) is frequent in the Chartulary. On the 
prefix ' Pet ' ( = a portion of land), see Skene, Four Ancient Books of Wales, 
i. 157. 

Neutyle. Earl David seems to have given land at Newtyle (in Forfar- 
shire) to his (natural) daughter Ada, wife of Malise, son of Ferteth, Earl 
of Strathern, from which she made a grant of Balemagh. Compare p. 4 
and p. 38. 

Most of the Aberdeenshire place-names are obvious, as Fintreth 
(Fintray), Inuerurin (Invemry), Monkegyn (Monkeigie), Boverdyn 
(Bourty), Durnach (Durno), 1 Uuen (Oyne), Arduuen (Ardoyne). The 
editor hesitates to offer conjectures as to Rothiod. In the bulls of 
Celestine in. and Innocent in. (pp. 103, 109) we find that Inverurie and 
Monkegie were then chapels of the church of Rothket or Rothketh ; 
perhaps this is the same place as 'Rothiod.' In a charter of King 
William to Earl David, preserved in Registrum Aberdonense (i. 9) we 
have Rothkes mentioned together with Durnach, Monkegyn, Fyntrach, 
and Bourdyn. The name ( Rothket ' as applied to a parish church seems 
to have disappeared at an early date. In No. n. f lnverury' is the 
parish church and ' Monkegie ' its chapel. Rothket does not appear in 
the old valuation (Regist. Aberdon. ii. 51-56), nor in Boiamund's roll 
(Theiner's Monumenta, 109-116). 

Mertonam. 'Mertona' is to be identified with the lands which lie 
south and west of Liberton, near Edinburgh, and have retained a form 
of the name in the modern ' Mortonhall.' Dr. J. Maitland Thomson 
has been good enough to furnish the following references. In 1357-8 
David ii. grants to William Sinclair the lands of 'Mertona' and 
' Merchamystona ' (Merchiston), in the sheriffdom of Edinburgh, on 
the resignation of them by William Bisset (Reg. de Neubotle, Append, 
p. 295). The Register of Neubotle contains earlier notices of Merton in 
connection with the Bissets, but none reaching to the time of Earl 
David. In 1404 Robert in. grants to Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney, 
Merton and Mertonehall (Genealogy of the Sinclair* ofRoslin, p. 62). See 



1 See No. xc., where Great Durnach adjoins Logindurnach. The latter was 
the name of the ecclesiastical division known afterwards as the chapel of the 
Garioch. See Collections for the History of Aberdeen and Banff, p. 526. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 231 

also Regist. Mag. Sigil. (A.D 1306-1424), p. 23, No. 15 ; and the same, 
vol. ii. No. 1271. 

Cum sacca et socca, cum tol et tern et infungenthefe, etc. Any discussion of 
the sense of these familiar, but really obscure, terms of feudal infeftment 
would be out of place here. Reference may be made, among the older 
feudalists, to Skene's De verborum significatione, and Craig's Jus Feudale, 
and among more recent writers to the Ghssarium in Wilkins's edition of 
Leges Anglo-Saxonicae, Bishop Stubbs's Glossary to Select Charters, and 
Mr. Cosmo Innes's Scotch Legal Antiquities (pp. 55-58). 

Testibus, etc. Hugh, capellanus regis, was intruded into the see of 
St. Andrews by King William (after the canonical election of John, the 
Scot), probably in 1178. Hugh died 4th Aug. 1188 (Scotichron. vi. 41 
and viii. 44). Joceline, fourth abbot of Melrose, was elected to the see 
of Glasgow, 23rd May 1174, and died 17th March 1199 (Chron. de Mailr. 
s.a.). Matthew was consecrated Bishop of Aberdeen, 2nd April 1172 
(Chron. de Mailr. s.a.), and died 20th August 1199 (ibid. s.a.). Simeon 
(or Simon) de Tonei, a monk of Melrose, abbot of the Cistercian 
monastery of Coggeshall (in Essex), who had returned to Melrose, was 
elected to Moray in 1171 (Regist. Morav. 359). He died 17th Sept. 1184 
(Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). Andrew, Bishop of Caithness, witnessed a charter 
of David i. (t 1153), see Book of Deer, p. 95. He died 29th Dec. 1184 
(Scotichron. viii. 33), or 30th Dec. 1195 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). 

Cornite Dunecano : Duncan, sixth Earl of Fife ; consented to Convention 
of King William with Henry n. at Falaise, 1174; founded nunnery of 
North Berwick ; died in 1203. His son, Malcolm, also witnesses this 
charter. [A. G.] 

Comite Gileberto : Gilbert, third Earl of Strathern ; founded the abbey 
of Inchaffray, 1198 ; was alive in 1219 ; and appears to have died shortly 
after. [A. G.] 

Comite Waldevo : Waldeve, fourth of his family called earl ; and the 
first styled Earl of Dunbar. He was a hostage for King William, and 
died in 1182. His son, Patrick, is also a witness to this charter. [A. G.] 

Malcolmo Comite Ethol: Malcolm, second Earl of Athole. Gave to the 
monks of Scone the church of Logen-Mahed ; to the abbey of Dun- 
fermelyn the tithes of the church of Moulin, for the weal of his own 
soul, the soul of his spouse, and the souls of the Kings of Scotland, his 
predecessors he being a descendant of King Donald Bane. 1 To the 
priory of St. Andrews he gave the patronage of the church of Dull for 
the weal of the soul of Hextilda his spouse. [A. G.] 

G. Comite de Anegus : Gillibrede, second Earl of Angus; is said to have 
died circa 1180. It is impossible to tell whether ' G' here be Gillibrede 
or Gilchrist, his son, who succeeded him. [A. G.] 

Comite Colbano : Colbain, Earl of Buchan, who appears in the Book of 
Deer as Colbain Mormer of Buchan. Along with Eva, daughter of 



Wood's Peerage, quoting Nisbet's Heraldry, vol. ii. Appendix, p. 168. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Gartnait, his wedded wife (a ben phusta), he gives to Drostan, and 
Columcille and Peter the Apostle (that is to the Columban monastery 
of Deer) a four davachs' share of what would come on the chief 
monasteries of Alba (Scotland). The deed is witnessed by the gentry of 
Buchan at Eilan (Ellon), which long continued to be the seat of the courts 
of the Earldom of Buchan. Mr. Joseph Robertson judges the charter to 
have been granted about the year 1150. l The fortunate occurrence of 
his name in this charter gives an earlier earl than hitherto known, and 
extends the earldom back for fifty years ; also furnishes an instance of 
the Scottish ' mormer' being changed to ' conies' or earl. 

Earl Colban of Buchan appears to be the Earl Colbein who brought 
a considerable force to Caldenle" [Caddon-Lea] to swell the host with 
which King William made his disastrous raid into Northumberland in 
1173. 

1. 472. ' De Eos e de Muraive unt grant ost banie. 
Certes, le Cunte Colbein ne s'e ublia mie. 
Seigneurs, le Cunte d'Anegus i vint od tel ai'e, 
Plus de treis mil Escoz aveit en sa baillie.' 

' From Ross and from Moray they have a great host gathered, 
Certainly Earl Colbein did not forget himself there. 
Lords, the Earl of Angus came there with such aid, 
More than three thousand Scots he had in his command.' 2 [A. G.] 

Ricardo de Moreuille, Const abulario : Richard of Morville, Constable of 
Scotland. Richard de Morville was made Constable of Scotland by King 
Malcolm about 1163, and continued in that office till his death in 1189. 
The family had considerable possessions in Cumberland, about Burgh- 
upon-Sands, etc., and in Lauderdale in Scotland. He was much about 
court, and is a frequent witness to charters. [A. G.] 

Roberto de Quincy : This is the first de Quincy that appears in record 
in Scotland. Dugdale says the family do not appear earlier than the 
reign of Henry H. in records in England (1154-1189). Robert de Quinci 
married Orabilis, daughter and heiress of Ness, the son of William, and 
got with her a large estate of Locres (Leuchars) and Lathrisk. A charter 
by Seyer de Quinci about Dauch Icthar Hathyn (modern form would be 
Auchter Eden) mentions that the lands were given to the priory of St. 
Andrews by his mother. Robert de Quinci, patre meo, and Stephan 
[de Quinci], parson of Locres, witness this charter ; ante 1208 as Seier 
is not styled Earl of Winchester. 3 After her husband's death Orabilis 
married Duncan, the eighth Earl of Mar, and became Countess of Mar. 
Duncan died 1238. [A. G.] 



1 Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff , vol. iv. p. 549. 

2 Chronicle of the War between the English and Scots in 1173 and 1174. By 
Jordan Fantosme. Translated by Francisque Michel, 1840, p. 22. 

3 Registrum Prioratus Sancti Andree, p. 291. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 233 

Waltero Oli/er : the third son of David Olifard, who was ancestor of 
the Lords Oliphant. See No. n. infra. [A. G.] 

Alano, etc. : Alan, son of Walter the Steward; Walter,, Steward of 
Scotland,, died 1177. Alan, his son, also Steward, died in 1204, and 
was buried at Paisley. [A. G.] 

Willelmo de Haya : the first de Haya on record that possessed the lands 
of Herrol (Errol), in Gowrie, which he obtained by charter from King 
William. [A. G.] 

Radolpho de Vere : Radulphus de Vere is witness to a confirmation by 
King William to the abbey of Cambuskenneth before 1214. He was 
ancestor of the Weirs of Blackwood. [A. G.] 

Ricardo de Munfichet : this name has crumbled down to Mushet. John 
of Drummond, Lord of Concrag, is said to have got Stobhall and other 
lands in Perth by marriage with a Munfichet heiress. A respectable 
family of Mushet possessed considerable estates in Menteith. [A. G.] 

Willelmo de Lindesey : William de Lindesei. See No. n. p. 235. 

Rand[plpho\ de Solis: Members of the family of Solis, Soulis, Sules 
appear frequently in early Scottish charters. We find Randulph witness- 
ing charters of Malcolm the Maiden (Regist. Glasguen. i. 15; Regist. 
Priorat. S. Andree, 198), and, still earlier, charters of David i. (Regist. 
Priorat. S. Andree, 182, 183, 189). William de Soulis was Justiciar of 
Lothian in 1284 (Regist. Glasguen. i. 196). See for more as to William de 
Soulis (Scotichron. x. 29). 

II 

Date. The date of this charter can be fixed with more exactness than 
many undated charters of the period. Roger, Bishop of St. Andrews, is 
a witness. He was not consecrated till the First Sunday in Lent, 1198 
(Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). The First Sunday in Lent fell on 15th Feb. in 
that year. But again, Hugh, ' chancellor of the king/ is also a witness. 
He died on vi. Id. Julii (10th July) 1199 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). The 
charter accordingly belongs to some date between 15th Feb. 1198 and 
10th July 1199. There must have been a charter of like tenor before 
8th March 1194-5. See Celestine's Confirmation (No. xcin.). 

The charter from the Denmyln MSS. in the Advocates' Library 
(hitherto regarded as the foundation charter), which is printed by 
Turnbull in Liber Sancte Marie de Lundoris (pp. 37-8) is of a later date, 
which can be shown to be 1202 or 1203. 

Page 2. De ordine Kelkoensi. The first abbot of Lindores, Guido, and 
the monks who formed the nucleus of the new house, were drawn from 
the Benedictine monastery of Kelso (see the charter printed in 
Appendix I.), which was in like manner the parent house of Arbroath 
and Kilwinning. 

Page 3. Dauid } filii mei. This son of Earl David is not mentioned by 
Fordun ; he was perhaps illegitimate. See Introduction, p. xxvii. 



234 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Magister Thomas. This was doubtless the priest of the parish of 
Lindores. 

Rivuli descendentis de magno lacu. See Introduction, p. xxxix. note. 

Redinche. See Introduction, p. xxxix. 

Omnia que pertinent ad molendinum. See Introduction, p. Ixxxix. 

lharam. A yair or yare, a stake-net. In Sir John Skene's old 
vernacular version of the statutes of Robert i. the word is used together 
with ' cruves.' See Introduction, p. xl. 

Cum omni. secta sua means all those tenants of lands astricted or 
thirled to that mill, who were known in Scotland as suckeners. Sequela is 
sometimes used as equivalent to secta. The multure was ordinarily paid 
in grain or in flour. Erskine (Institutes, Book 11., tit. ix. 19), interprets, 
incorrectly, sequelae as the payments made to the servants of the mill 
over and above the multure paid to the lord. See Craig's Jus Feudale 
(lib. n. dieg. viii. 12), and Ducange (sub Secta ad molendinum). 

Et multura. Multure dues. The payments due to the lord of the mill 
for the privilege of having corn ground there. See Introduction, 
p. Ixxxv. ff. 

Ultra muneth. f The Mounth' is the name applied to the mountainous 
range running from the west with a northerly trend, and terminating in 
the north of Kincardineshire. 

Lethgauel et malind. In the fifteenth century rental of the abbey 
(Laing's Lindores Abbey, p. 416) Mellensyde appears. It is the Malinsyd 
of the map (1654) of Gordon of Straloch. The identification of Lethgauel 
must be left to^those better versed than the editor in the topography of 
the Garioch. Charter cxvu. (assuming Lethgauen to be a variant of the 
name) is a clue to its position. 

Pramet. For this and the names of other churches in the Garioch, see 
Introduction, p. xli. 

Page 4. Mota canum. The word mota still survives in the French 
terms meute de chiens, chef de meute, etc. 

Curiam . . . et dignitatem pacts. ' Curia ' is the abbot's court of secular 
jurisdiction; ' dignitas fpacis ' is perhaps the privilege of asylum, the 
right of affording protection (for a time) to criminals craving the pax 
ecclesiae. 

Vivariis. The vivarium, or fish-pond, where fish caught, if not 
immediately needed, were placed, was an usual adjunct of the religious 
houses. The;: word has been a fruitful source of mistakes, the second f u* 
being often read as ( n.' Hence more ' vineyards' (vinariae) have been 
imagined to exist than facts justify. See Cosmo Innes's Scotch Legal 
Antiquities, p. 44. But the context generally leaves no doubt as to what 
is the word and what is its sense. 

Page. 5. Hits testibus. Some of the witnesses have been already dealt 
with in the notes to No. i. Roger, Bishop of St. Andrews, was Roger 
de Beaumont, son of Robert, Earl of Leicester. He was first cousin of 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 235 

the king, William's mother Ada being sister to the earl. He was con- 
secrated 15th Feb. 1189 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). He died 7th July 1202 
(Scotichron. vi. 42). John, Bishop of Dunkeld, is ' John the Scot ' who 
had been ousted from St. Andrews by King William. He was confirmed 
in Dunkeld by the Pope in 1183. He died in 1203 in the monastery of 
Newbottle, where he assumed the habit on his death-bed (Scotichron. 
vi. 41). 

Hugone cancellario regis. Hugh of Roxburgh, afterwards elected to the 
bishopric of Glasgow after the death of Joceline (17th March 1199). He 
died, probably before consecration, 10th July 1199. 

Comite Patricio. Patrick, fifth Earl of Dunbar, from 1182 (Chron. de 
Mailr.} till 1232 (ibid.) He founded a monastery of Red Friars at 
Dunbar in 1218. In 1184 he married Ada, a natural daughter of King 
William the Lion. [A. G.] 

Roberto de Lundors. So the MS. reads. This is doubtless Robert of 
London, natural sou of King William. In Celestine's bull (p. 104) he is 
1 Robertus de Lundres, filius prefati regis ' (sc. Willelmi) ; he is ' Robertus 
de Lundoniis' in No. LXXXV. (p. 91). 

Seierde Quinci : son of Robert de Quinci and Orabilis, daughter of Ness, 
son of William. Was made Earl of Winchester in 1208 (Dugdale). 
[A. G.] 

Philippo de Valuniis. This family took their surname from Valones 
or Valoignis, in Costatyn, in Normandy. Peter de Valoniis was an 
eminent follower of William the Conqueror, and obtained many manors 
from him. His son, Roger de Valoniis, had six sons, of whom Philip de 
Valoniis came to Scotland about the end of the reign of King Malcolm iv. 
He was one of the hostages for the liberation of King William the Lion 
in 1174 ; in recompence the king gave him the manors of Panmure and 
Benvie in Forfarshire, and appointed him High Chamberlain about 1180. 
He died on the 5th of November 1215, and was interred in Melrose 
Abbey. [A. G.] 

WiUelmo de Lindesey. William, third of the family, was a hostage for 
King William 1174; was Justiciar of Lothian 1189-1199. David de 
Lindeseie is probably his son and heir. [A. G.] 

WiUelmo Cumyn : William Cumyn, succeeded his father about 1189. 
By marriage with Marjory, Countess of Buchan in 1210, he became Earl 
of Buchan. He died in 1233. [A. G.] 

W alter o Olifer : the third son of David Olifard, the first of the name 
who came to Scotland, and received from King David i. the lands of 
Crailing and Smallhame in Roxburghshire. Walter was a hostage for 
King William in 1174. His father, David, was the ancestor of the Lords 
Oliphant. [A. G.] 

Walkelin filio Stephuni. He appears frequently as a witness to Earl 
David's charters. [A. G.] 

WiUelmo Wacelin. He also is a frequent witness to Earl David's 
charters. Had lands in Newtile. See Nos. x., xxxvn., infra. [A. G.] 



236 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Roberto Basset ; also a frequent witness to Earl David's charters. 
Families of this name had great possessions in the Midland Counties of 
England, such as Drayton, etc. [A. G.] 

Henrico filio comitis. He is either Henry of Striuelyn, or Henry of 
Brechin, both illegitimate sons of Earl David. For the last, see also 
No. LXI., infra. [A. G.] 

Ill 

Date. John, Bishop of Aberdeen, a witness, was consecrated certainly 
before 6th Dec. 1201, when he appeared as ' bishop of Aberdeen' at 
the council held by Cardinal John, of Salerno (Regist. Glasguen. i. 81). 
He died in 1207 Oct. 13. (Gawan's Epistolare in Regist. Aberdon. ii. 
247). Radulph, Bishop of Brechin, another witness, was consecrated in 
1202 (Chron. de Mailr. s. a.). As a third witness Osbert, abbot of Kelso, 
died in 1203, (Chron. de Mailr. s. a.). The charter must be dated as in 
1202 or 1203. 

The original of this charter is in the Denmyln collection, preserved in 
the Advocates' Library, and has been printed (not very accurately) by 
Turnbull in the Appendix to Liber S. Marie de Lundoris, pp. 37-38. The 
variations from our text are few and unimportant. 

Page 8. Osberto abbate Kelchoensi : prior of Lesmahago ; succeeded to 
Kelso in 1180; died 1203. 

Henrico abbate de Aberbrodoc. Henry was second abbot of Arbroath, 
and succeeded in 1179. 

Simone archidiacono de Aberdoen, Roberto decano de Aberdoen. Both 
these ecclesiastics are witnesses to a charter of Bishop Matthew de 
Kyninmond (Regist. Aberdon. i. ii.). Robert, dean of Aberdeen, is a 
witness of No. v. 

Normanno filio Malcolmi. Of the family afterwards known as that of 
Lescelin (Lesley). See Introduction, p. Ivi. 

IV 

Date. There is nothing that enables us to fix the date of this charter 
of Earl David within very narrow limits. It was probable like others of 
the minor charters shortly after the date of the great charter (No. n.) 

Page 9. Cum eorum sequela. See Introduction, p. Ivii. 

Page 10. David de Lindeseie. One of the ancestors of the family of 
the Earls of Crawfurd, acquired Crawfurd estates by marriage, and died 
1230. [A.G.] 

Gilberto Dolepain. The form Dolepain probably arises from the 
phonetic adhesion of the d in 'de.' It is doubtless the same witness 
who appears in No. xi. as 'Gilbertus Olepain,' and in No xu. as 
'Gilbertus de Holepen.' We find a f Willelmus Dolopen' witnessing a 
deed of the time of Richard, Bishop of St. Andrews (1163-1178), in Regist. 
Priorat. S. Andree, p. 319. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 237 



Date. Between about 1200 or 1201, and 1207, when John, Bishop of 
Aberdeen, died. 

Salvo cano. The small tribute, custom, or cane, referred to as due to 
the Bishop of St. Andrews, had not been commuted or exchanged, as 
were certain tithes and customs due to the Bishop of Aberdeen out of 
Durno, Rothkes, Monkegie, Fintray, and Bourtie, which in the time of 
Bishop Matthew had been exchanged for two ploughgates of land in 
Kinethmond given to the bishop by Earl David (Regist. Aberdon. i. 9). 

Page 11. Malisiofilio comitis Fertheth. See Introduction, p. xxxiv. 
Duobus Henricis filiis comitis. Henry of Stirling and Henry of Brechin. 
See Introduction, p. xxvi. 

VI 

Date. Before the death of Earl Duncan in 1204 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.) 
and if 'A.' abbot of Dunfermline is Archibald (Erchinbald) before his 
death in 1198 (ibid. s.a.). 

Mr. Turnbull printed this charter, from an inferior text, in Liber S. 
Marie de Lundoris, p. 8. ' Malisio comite Fertheth,' as printed by him 
is an obvious error. ' R. de Anas ' should, as we learn from our Chartu- 
lary, be 'N. de Anas.' In No. vn. Nicholaus de Aness appears as a 
witness. 

Page 11. Ad colcrike. The name Colcrick seems to have disappeared. 
Charter LXXVI. may help towards determining its locality. 

VII 

Date. Probably before the foundation charter, but there is nothing to 
determine the date within narrow limits. 

This is printed in Liber S. Marie de Lundoris (p. 24) with a few trifling 
variants in the spelling of the names of witnesses. 

In quarrario meo in hyrneside. Mr. Alex. Laing (Lindores Abbey, 
p. 53, note) writes : ' The quarry, which is now covered up, was of old red 
sandstone ; it was about a mile east from the abbey, on the farm of 
Parkhill. The track of a small canal for conveying the stones to the 
abbey was said to be discernible in recent times.' On the etymology of 
' Hyrneside,' ' Irnsyde,' or ' Earnside/ see Mr. Laing's note (Lindores 
Abbey, p. 87). 

VIII 

Date. After the bull of Innocent in. (20th March 1198), in which there 
is not to be found a confirmation of this grant. 

Page 13. Wicheston. This name in the rubric does not appear in the 



238 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

text. It is the Witstones of the fifteenth century rental (Lindores 
Abbey, p. 411). The lands all lie close together in the south of Kin- 
cardiiieshire on the sea-coast. 

Eglesgirg, 'ecclesia Cyrici.' See Bishop Forbes's Kalendar of Scottish 
Saints, pp. 319-20. In modern times the name St. Cyrus has been 
given to the parish. For St. Cyriacus, see Smith and Wace, Diet, of 
Christian Biography, s.v. (3). This saint is commemorated in Breviarium 
Aberdonense together with St. Julitta (his mother) on 16th June. By 
an error the Kalendar of this Breviary reads ( Ceriaci et Julitti,' as if 
the name of the latter saint was Julittus. Ceres, in Fife, has been 
supposed to be derived from the name of this saint. In the forms Girrig, 
Gerrig, Gwrig, the name appears in some Welsh place-names, as in 
Llangwrig, or Llangirrig in Montgomeryshire. The more common form 
in Wales is Curig. See Forbes's Kalendar of Scottish Saints, pp. 319-20 ; 
Rees's Welsh Saints, pp. 82, 307. 

Pethergus, Pethannot. These names have perished. The Kaim of 
Matheres is a crag overlooking the sea, with the ruins of a fortlet upon 
it. The burn of Matheres appears to be the burn east from the village, 
where the wild Falls of Den-Finella are seen. In the charter of erection 
of the lordship of Lindores, dated at the burgh of Perth, 31st March 
1600, Wicheston appears as Wistoun ; and among the lands we find 
Pittargus and Pittannous. [A. G.] 

IX 

Date. Perhaps before No. n., in which the grant is confirmed with 
others. 

Page 13. Balemawe. Mr. Laing writes : ( Balmaw in the parish of 
Newtyle ' (Lindores Abbey, p. 460). This charter shows that Mr. Laing 
is in error as to the original grantor of Balmaw. In No. xxxvi., the 
grant of a ploughgate of land, ' cum corpore meo/ in the vill of Bale- 
magh, is made by Ada, natural daughter of Earl David. In a rental, 
which Mr. David Laing assigned to about 1580, we find, ' Balmaw and 
Newtyld yeirlie sevintyne poundis viijs' (Lindores Abbey, p. 423). 

Henrico abbate de Aberbrothoc. He appears in No. xi. as ' Abbot of 
St. Thomas,' that is, of Arbroath, dedicated to St. Thomas of Canterbury. 
His tenure of office was from 1179 till (certainly) 1202, and perhaps 
later. 

X 

Date. Somewhat later than the last. This is not confirmed in the 
Foundation Charter. 

William Wascelin is a frequent name among the witnesses of the early 
part of the thirteenth century. The present charter shows that he held 
his land at Newtyle of Earl David. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 239 

Averia. ' Beasts of burden/ here distinguished from horses, though 
in other documents it includes cart-horses, and, in the later Scottish 
vernacular, an ' aver' was a 'cart-horse.' 

XI 

Date. Apparently between 8th March 1195 and 20th March 1198 ; for 
the grant of the church of Whissendene is not confirmed in the hull of 
Celestine in., but is confirmed in that of Innocent in. 

Wissendene. See Introduction, p. 1. 

[Mr. A. Laing (Lindores Abbey, p. 54, note) states that Mr. Scott, son 
of Sir Gilbert Scott, who had charge of the restoration of Whisendine 
church (1868), is of opinion that the north transept, which still stands, 
was built about A.D. 1220. A. G.] 

XII 

Date. See No. xi. 

The duplication of this charter, as also of that relating to Conington 
{No. xiv.), was perhaps for exhibition in England to the Bishop of 
Lincoln or his official. The witnesses differ slightly from those of 
No. xi. 

See Introduction, p. 1. 

XIII 

Date. Before 1195 ; as the grant is confirmed in the bull of Celestine in. 
(No. xcni.) 

See Introduction, p. 1. 

Page 16. Cunington, or Conington, lies in the north of the shire of 
Huntingdon, several miles south from Peterborough. Camden (1607) 
says Cunington was possessed by Waldeof, Earl of Huntingdon. By 
marriage with Isabel, daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon, Cunington 
and other large estates fell to Robert Brus. From Brus's ( younger son, 
Bernard, who inherited Cunnington and Exton, Sir Robert Cotton, 
Knight, derives his [descent], a person who, besides other excellencies, 
is a great admirer and master of learning, and has here a collection of 
venerable antiquities from all parts.' Gibson's Camden (1695), p. 423. 
[A. G.] 

Malcolmo filio Bertolfi. See No. LXXXIV. 

Simone de Seynliz. See Note on No. LXXXV. 

XIV 

Date. See No. xin. ; but this was not written till after 1195. 
The list of witnesses makes it clear that the two ( duplications' 
(Nos. xii., xiv.) were executed at the same time. 



240 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



Date. Between 1219, when John succeeded his father as Earl of 
Huntingdon, and 1232 when he succeeded to the earldom of Chester. 

Page 19. Roberto de Campaniis. Dr. Maitland Thomson has informed 
the editor that 'the English printed records leave no doubt that de 
Campania is in the vernacular de Champagne, or de Chaumpaigne (there 
are numerous varieties of spelling).' This witness is probably the father 
of Robert de Campaniis, the grantor of No. cxm., who appears to have 
succeeded his brother William de Campaniis, son of Robert, in the lands 
of Stokes in Leicestershire. See pp. 137-140. 

Johanne de Brus. Robert de Brus (1215-1245) married Isabella, 
daughter of Earl David and sister of Earl John. This John may have 
been a son. There is a John de Brus, reputed ancestor of the Bruces of 
Clackmannan, and Earls of Elgin and Kincardine. See Wood's Peerage, 
i. 318. [A. G.] 

Normanno const abulario. Norman, of the family afterwards known as 
Lescelyn (Leslie), was constable of Inverurie Castle. See p. Ivi. 

Henrico de Dundemor. Dundemore, near Lindores, now whittled 
down to Dunsmoor or even Dinmuir. Its original name, Dun-dhu-mor, 
appears to be derived from the ancient British fort on Norman's Law. 
The family of Dundemore kept possession for a lengthened period, and 
took the Scottish side in the Wars of Independence. [A. G.] 

Thoma de Lindeseia. Nothing is known of this Lindsay. [A. G.] 

Nicholao de Inuerpeffyn. He appears frequently as a witness. [A. G.] 

XVI 

Date. Between 1219 and 1232. See No. xv. 
All the witnesses appear in No. xv. 

XVII 

Date. After 1232, when John, Earl of Huntingdon, succeeded to the 
earldom of Chester, and before 5th June 1237, when he died. 

Page 21. Pontem de Balhagerdyn. This is an early notice of a bridge 
in Aberdeenshire. Balhaggardy is north of Inverurie, near the river 
Ury. [A. G.] 

Ad pietanciam, etc. It was very common for the founders of an 
' anniversary ' or yearly commemoration of some one defunct, observed 
ordinarily in the church by a Mass for the soul of the departed with 
vespers and matins of the dead, to bequeath money for charitable 
purposes, to be expended on the poor, and for making some addition 
on that day to the scanty fare of the monks. The portion of eggs, 
cheese, or fish thus added to each monk's meal was called a 'pittance.' 
The correct form of the word seems to be pictanda, which connects it 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 241 

not with pietas, but with picta, a small coin first struck by the earls of 
Poitiers (Pictavia). See Ducange, s.v. In the Chartulary of Coldstream 
(p. 24) we find Walter, the chaplain, granting a toft or croft to the 
nunnery 'ad unam petanciam faciendam dictis monialibus' on the 
morrow of St. Laurence, for the soul of his mother. 

H. Phyton. He is ' Dominus Hugo Phyton ' in No. xix. 

Simone de Garentuly. He witnesses No. xvni., which see. 

XVIII 

Date. Between 1232 and 5th June 1237. 

Page 21. Toftum in villa de Inverbervyn. Towards the close of the 
fifteenth century 'the annewellis of Bervay' brought viiij s. to the 
monastery (Lindores Abbey, p. 411), and the same sum appears in the 
rental of the lands of Lindores about one hundred years later (ibid. 
p. 424). 

Utting Cachepol. The latter word perhaps points to office. We find 
one Huttyngus, who was ' marescallus ' of Brice, Bishop of Moray, 
1203-1222 (Regist. Morav. p. 61). 

Page 22. Simone de Garentuli. We find ' Simon de Garentuly' 
witnessing a charter, relating to lands in the diocese of Moray, on 25th 
April 1229 (Regist. Morav., p. 26). Garentuli seems to be Grantuly, or 
Garntuly, or Gartly, in Strathbolgie. See Regist. Morav., pp. 365, 366, 
407. The parish was in the diocese of Moray, and was mensal of the 
bishop. See Theiner's Monumenta, p. 69. Simon was 'ballivus' of 
John, Earl of Chester and Huntingdon before 1234. See No. xxi. 
He gave the lands of Ederlarg to the monastery (No. i,vi.). In 
No. LVII. he describes himself as ' miles,' and gives lands in exchange 
for 'second tithes.' He obtained leave to have a private chapel at his 
seat at Cremond near Inverurie (No. LXIII.) 

XIX 

Date. Between 1232 and 5th June 1237. 

Page 22. To/to Sancti dementis. The position of St. Clement's Church 
in Dundee is still indicated by St. Clement's Wynd. 

Page 23. Portencrag. Portincraig is now on the shore of Fife, opposite 
Broughty, at the opening of the mouth of the Tay. [The editor of the 
Register of Arbroath points out that Portincrag at first lay to the north 
of Tay, being in fact the Port of the Crag on which Broughty Castle now 
stands. The name has been transferred to the opposite shore of Fife. 
A.G.] 

Petro pincerna. Pincerna may be the designation of the occupation of 
the witness, or it may possibly be a Latin rendering of the family name 
' Butler.' 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

XX 

Date. Between 1232 and 5th June 1237, probably after Whitsunday 
1234. 

XXI 

Date. See No. xx. 

XXII 

Date. 20th April 1236. 

Page 25. Dunmernoch . . . in Strathtay. [Drummernoch in Strathtay 
cannot be identified. A. G.] 

Fedal in theynagio de Ouchyrardour. These lands are obviously the 
Westere Fedal of No. xxm., the marches of which were determined by a 
jury in 1246, the result being fortified by the seal of the Justiciar of 
Scotland, Alan Durward. Thanages were crown-lands ordinarily let out 
at fee -farm. [The name Fedal persists in Feddal House, Mid Feddal, 
and Feddal Hill, north of Braco. A. G.] On the thanages in Scotland 
see W. F. Skene's full note in his edition of Fordun (ii. 414-419). In 
Skene's long list of thanages we do not find Auchterarder (supplied by 
this charter). But he mentions Forteviot not far off. 

P. Comite de Dunbar. Patrick, sixth Earl of Dunbar, succeeded his 
father in 1232. He died at Damietta in Egypt in 1248, in the crusade 
under Louis ix. of France. [A. G.] 

W. Comnyn, Comite de Menethet. Walter Comyn became Earl of 
Menteith by marriage with the Countess of Menteith, one of the 
daughters of Maurice, third earl. He was earl from 1231 to 1258. He 
was the only Comyn who was earl. [A. G. ] 

R. de Quency, constabulario Scocie. Roger de Quency, or Quincy, 
became Constable of Scotland, by his marriage with Helena, daughter 
of Alan, Lord of Galloway, on whose death, in 1233, De Quincy suc- 
ceded to the office and dignity. [A. G.] 

W. filio Alani, senescallo, Justiciario Scocie. Walter succeeded his 
father, Alan, High Steward and Justiciar of Scotland, in 1204; was 
made Justiciar of Scotland in 1230, died 1246. [A. G.] 

XXIII 

Date. 1246. 

Page 26. Aldendoneche, etc. The editor must leave to those versed in 
the topography of the district of Auchterarder to trace or guess at these 
boundaries. 

Tempore vicecomitatus Domini Johannis de Haya. This sheriff of Strath- 
ern appears to be John de Haya of Ardnaughton, son of William de 
Haya, the first who received a charter of Errol. Sir John was the 
ancestor of the Hays of Ardnaughton. See No. LXVI. [A. G.] 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 243 

We find John de Haya as 'vicecomes de Perth/ 31st March 1226 
(Regist. Morav. p. 22). 

Hominibus quamplurimis Domini Joachim. No doubt this is Sir 
Joachim of Kynbuk, recorded in Nos. xxvm., xxxv., cxn. Sir Joachim 
was the first of the family of Kinbuck of that ilk, who held the lands of 
Kinbuck for several generations. In 1458 Marjorie, daughter of Malcolm 
of Kinbuck (apparently the last of the family) married Alexander Bruce 
of Stenhouse. See Rev. John Anderson's Laing Charters No. 143. 
[A. G] 

Kinbuck is some two or three miles north of Dunblane, and not very 
far from Feddal. 

Comitis de Strathern. This would appear to be Malise, fifth earl, who 
succeeded about 1244, and died in 1270. [A. G.] 

A. Hostiarii. Alan, the Door-ward (Ostiarius, Hostiarius) was appointed 
Justiciar in 1244 (Scotichron. ix. 61). He was reputed the flos militia 
(ibid. x. 1). He was married to a natural daughter of Alexander n. 
(ibid. x. 4). He was appointed at Roxburgh (20th Sept. 1255) one of 
the fifteen guardians during the minority of Alexander in. (Foedera, 
i. 566). He died in 1275 (Scotichron. x. 35). Bower's eulogium on 
Durward will be found in the same place. 

XXIV 

Date. In the time of Robert, Earl of Strathern, who is said to have 
died before 1244. See the Genealogical Table, Introduction, p. xxxiv. 

Page 27. This is a commutation of second tithes (tithes of cane and 
rent) due to Lindores (by the grant of Malise, husband of Ada, daughter 
of Earl David) from the lands in Strathern and Hure by means of an 
exchange of them for f Fedal in Kathermothel,' which exchange was 
made by Sir Fergus, son of Earl Gilbert, and nephew of Malise. In 
addition to the land, permission to cut timber in his wood was granted 
by Sir Fergus. This land I take to be the ' Eister Feddellis ' of the 
fifteenth century rental (Lindores Abbey, p. 412). 

De exercitu, etc. See Introduction, p. Ixxiii. 

Kathermothel. Till a few years ago Muthill included, as a parish, the 
parts now separated into the parish of Ardoch. ' Cathair,' or, as here, 
Kather, is the Gaelic word for a ' fort ' ; and there can be no reasonable 
doubt that Kathermothel means that part of Muthill where the Roman 
camp forms such a conspicuous feature. Keirburn still perpetuates the 
name. At a later date the other and higher part of Muthill came to be 
styled Ochter-Muthill. [A. G.] 

Hure. King William grants a charter to Gilbert, Earl of Stradherue, 
of Vre and Lethendin, by the marches by which Nes, son of William, 
Galfrid de Malvil and another perambulated it for Malise brother of the 
said earl. William de Boscho was chancellor when the charter was 
granted, 1211-1214 (Liber Insule Missarum, p. xxv). Later, Malise, 



244 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

seventh Earl of Strathern, who succeeded in 1296, gives a donation of 8s. 
silver yearly from his territory de Magna Hure. In the semi-Saxon 
English of that time the word 'Micel' or f Mucel/ great, was reputed 
fashionable, and Magna Hure became Micel-Hure, now Meiklour, in the 
nook betwixt Hay and Tay. See also Nos. xxxiv. and xxxv. [A. G.] 

Page 28. Waltero de Rotheuen. See under No. xxvi. 
Henrico de A$chirche. Nothing known of him. [A. G.] 
Rogero de Leuuethot. See No. xxvi. 

XXV 

Date. Earl Robert, the grantor of this confirmation, is said to have 
died before 1244. And as Innocent, afterwards abbot of Inchaffray, was 
appointed prior in 1220 we can roughly approximate to the limits of the 
date. 

Page. 29. Innocencio abbate de insula missarum. This is doubtless the 
canon of Scone who in 1220 was made prior of Inchaffray, f amoto 
quodam Scotico propter insufficientiam ' (Scotichr. ix. 36), and who was 
afterwards elevated to the rank of abbot of Inchaffray. 

Gilberto archidiacono Dumblanensi. He appears again as a witness in 
No. xxvii., xxx., xxxi. (G. archidiacono de Strathern), and xxxn. 

Gilescop de Cletheueys. Cletheueys (Clavage). [A. G.] 

XXVI 

Date. In the time of Earl Robert. See No. xxv. and before the end 
of 1234, about which time William became Earl of Mar. As Clement, 
Bishop of Dunblane, is a witness, the date is probably towards the end of 
1233 or sometime in 1234. 

Page 29. Beny : now Bennie. [On the east side of the Knaik above the 
village of Braco. A. G.] Concrag (not named in the text of the charter) 
was probably what is described as the land ' pertaining to Beny,' near 
the land of Roger de Luvethot. ' Beney ' brought a rent of x Ib, xiijs. iiijd. 
at the close of the fiteenth century (Lindores Abbey, p. 412). [It can hardly 
be the Concraig on which Drummoud Castle was afterwards built. The 
name has now perished. A. G.] 

Militis mei. See Introduction, pp. Ixxiii-lxxvi. 

Page 30. Clemente Dunblanensi episopo. Clement, a Dominican friar, 
was consecrated for Dunblane, 4th September 1233 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.): 
he died in 1258 (ibid, s.a.), or, according to Bower (Scotichr. x. ii.) in 
1256. 

Waltero filio Alani de Rotheuen. One of the ancestors of the Cowrie 
family : is a witness to a controversy with Galfrid, Bishop of Dunblane, 
1239. [A. G.] 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 245 

Willelmo filio Duncani Comitis de Mar. William succeeded his father 
about 1234, and died shortly after 1270. [A. G.] 

Luuethot. The same name as Louthit. Has this name been filed 
downtoLoutfut? [A. G.] 

XXVII 

Date. Time of Robert, Earl of Strathern, who died circa 1244, and after 
1233, when Clement, Bishop of Dunblane, was consecrated. 

XXVIII 

Date. Time of Malise fifth Earl of Strathern, before 1258, when Clement, 
Bishop of Dunblane, died. The charter is between about 1244 and 
1258. 

Page 31. Cotken. This name appears in Great Seal Charters and 
Retours as Cathkin. It appears to have been the moor and low hill to 
the north or north-east of the Roman Station at Ardoch. Tacks of 
Benee (Beny) and Catkin or Caitkin made to Sir John Stirling of Keir 
in 1516 and 1532 will be found in The Stirlings of Keir, pp. 310, 346. 

/. Abbot of Lindores. See Appendix, p. 303. 

N. Is abbot of Inchaffray. This is an abbot not hitherto known. He 
must have immediately preceded Alan. See Liber Insule Missarum, 
p. xiv. 

Domino W. de Rotheuen. Was alive in 1267 ; of the family of whom 
came the Earl of Gowrie. [A. G.] 

G. filio suo. Sir William de Rotheuen had a son named Gilbert. 
[A. G.] 

XXIX, XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII, XXXIV 

This group of charters concern the lands of Rathengothen (Raten- 
gothen, Rathargothen). The exact position of these lands is uncertain. 

[Rathengothen appears to be now Redgorton in the shire of Perth, on 
the river Almond, some miles north from the city. Under the form 
Redgortou and other spellings it appears frequently in Liber de Scon. 
A. G.] 

Dates. The original grant (No. xxix) is made to the abbey by Malise, 
son-in-law of the founder, in the time of Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, and 
before January 1215 (see No. xcv.) who confirms it (No. xxx.) in the 
time of Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane (c. 1214-c. 1223). It is also 
confirmed in Earl Gilbert's time, and before 1223 by Robert the then 
eldest son and heir of Earl Gilbert (No. xxxi.) and by Fergus, another 
son of the earl (No. xxxn.) e Conveth ' and rent were, however, due from 
a half davach of the lands of Rathengothen to the cathedral church of 
Dunkeld, ' ad opus Macleins et Scoloccorum.' See Introduction p. liv. 
This was quitclaimed (No. xxxm.) for the sum of four shillings a year to 



246 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

be paid by the heirs of Malise, the original grantor, to the chapter of the 
cathedral in the time of Bishop H[ugh], that is, between 1214 and 1228, 
who confirmed the quitclaim of the chapter (No. xxxiv. ). 
Witnesses to No. xxix. 

Page 32. Waltero Olifard. Sir Walter Olifard was Justiciar of Lothian. 
He married in 1200 Christian, daughter of the Earl of Strathern, and got 
with her the lands of Strageath. He died in 1242. [A. G.] 

David de Lindeseia. He witnesses charters to Newbotle, etc, 1200- 
1227 ; married the heiress of Crawford, and with her acquired large 
estates in Lanarkshire ; was knighted ; died in 1230. [A. G.] 

Walkelino filio Stephani. He appears to have belonged to Northamp- 
ton. He is probably the f Walkelino braciatori meo ' (' my ale-brewer '), 
to whom King William gives a charter of Innerpefir (Lib. S. Thome de 
Abirbrothic). [A. G.] 

Willelmo Wascelyn. A frequent witness. Probably a Huntingdon 
name. The modem form might be Wesley. [A. G.] 

David Olifard. Probably the brother of Sir Walter. [A. G.] 

XXX 

Abraham (witness) was Bishop of Dunblane before 1217. See Theiner's 
Monumenta, No. vi. Between him and Osbert, who died in 1231, there 
was a Bishop Ralph. 

XXXI 

Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane, is a witness. See above. 

XXXII 

Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane, is a witness. 

XXXIII 

Before No. xxxiv., which see. 

XXXIV 

Date. Before 1229 and after 1214. 

H. . . . episcopus Dunkeldensis. Hugh de Sigillo, known as ' pauperum 
episcopus' (Scotichr. ix. 47). He died in 1228 (ibid.) 

XXXV 

Date. In the episcopate of Clement, Bishop of Dunblane (4th Sept. 
1233-1258) and after 1244, about which time Earl Malise succeeded. 

Page 37. Domino Gileberto de Haya. See pp. 82, 83. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 247 

Domino Gilberto de Glencarny. An agreement was made (12th Sept. 
1232) between Andrew, Bishop of Moray, and Gilbert son of Gilbert, 
Earl of Strathern, respecting a half davoch of Kyncarny in feu-farm 
(Regist. Morav. 89). By gift of King William (c. 1180) Earl Gilbert got 
Kinnebethin (Kinveachie) in Strathspey, and conferred the lands on a 
younger son. The cadet family retained Glencairnie till 1391 when 
they exchanged it for Fochabers (Grant Book, vol. iii.) [A. G.] 

Domino Joachim. No doubt Sir Joachim of Kinbuk. See No. xxui. 

Domino Nicholao Canonico de Incheaffray. Inchaffray was a house of 
Austin Canons. 

XXXVI 

Date. Ada's grant is confirmed in Earl David's foundation charter, 
but it does not appear in the bull of Pope Celestine m., but one plough- 
gate of land in the vill of Newtyle is confirmed by Innocent in. This 
charter is therefore to be dated between 8th March 1195 and 20th 
March 1199. 

Page 38. Balemagh. We find Neutile in the foundation charter, p. 4, 
and Balmaw among the lands confirmed to Lindores by David n., 1364 
(Reg. Mag. Sig. (folio) p. 36, No. 92). [The name of a place in or close 
to Neutile. Gaelic, Baile, a town, Magh a plain : here no doubt Strath- 
more. A. G.] 

Cum corpore meo. See Introduction, p. Ixxxii. 

Malcolmo filio Bertulfi. See No. LXXXIV. 

XXXVII 

Date. This, like No. xxxvi., is an early chai'ter. Though the name of 
Mabel, wife of William, is not mentioned in No. x., it is plain that 
No. x. is a confirmation of the grant made in the present charter. See 
note on No. x. 

Page 39. David de Haya, who succeeded William de Haya in Errol, 
c. 1200. For this name, and Thomas his brother, and Robert, parson of 
Errol, see notes on Nos. LXXVI.-LXXIX. 

David oiselario. ' Oiselarius ' is a ' bird-catcher,' { fowler ' ; Fr. 
oiseleur. It may be here an indication of occupation, or, possibly, 
already an equivalent of the family name, Fowler. 

XXXVIII 

Date. The time of Earl David. If the toft in Munros (Montrose) 
given by David de St. Michael is the toft in Munros recorded in 
Celestine's Bull, which is said to be possessed by the monastery ' ex 
donacione' of King William, the charter must be dated before 8th 
March 1195. 



248 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



XXXIX 

Date. This is a confirmation of William Wascelyn's oxgate in New- 
tyle. See No. xxxvu. Griffyn perhaps came into possession of 
Wascelyn's estate by marriage with his widow Mabel. Mr. A. Gibb in 
his notes offers the same conjecture. G[ilbert?] is abbot of Arbroath, 
so the charter must be dated before 1226. 



XL 

Date. Before 9th August 1248, when the grant was confirmed, 
No. XLI., and after 1237, when John Earl of Chester and Huntingdon 
died, whose property was divided between his sisters. 

Page 42. Isabella was the second daughter of Earl David, married to 
Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale. 

This charter is printed from an inferior text (and with errors of the 
editor added) in Turnbull's Liber S, Marie de Lundoris, p. 14. 

The barony of Cragy is east of the town of Dundee. 

Miltown of Cragy is well known. 

The vill of Abraham has not been identified. 

Willelmo de Brechyn, son of Henry of Brechin, Earl David's son. He 
died about 1284. [A. G.]. 

XLI 

Date. This charter is dated at its close, 9th August 1248. 

Robert de Brus, the grantor, was grandfather of King Robert. See 
Dunbar's Scottish Kings, p. 67. 

Page 43. Alexandra Cumyn, Comite de Buchan. The second Cumyn, 
earl (1240-1289), Constable of Scotland. 

Thoma de Lascelis. A knight. 

The Registrum Prioratus S. Andree supplies many names of members 
of this family. Thomas is not among them. 

The Bishops of St. Andrews and Dunkeld and the abbot of Dunferm- 
line are commanded by the Pope (Innocent iv.), in 1250, to assign a 
suitable sum of money to Alan de Lasceles who is going, with Richard 
called Giffard, kinsman of the King of Scotland, to the Holy Land 
(Theiner's Monumenta, p. 52). 

Gilberto de Hay a. See notes on Nos. LXXVI.-LXXIX. 

Humfrido de Kirkepatrik. A later personage of the same name 
appears frequently in the Exchequer Rolls, vol. i. 

Hugone de Berkelay. We find Hugo de Berkley among the associates 
of the Comyns, in 1257 (Scotichron. x. 10). We find him sheriff of 
Berwick in 1264 (Exchequer Rolls, i. 22). He was Justiciar of Lothian 
in 1265 (ibid. 27). 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 249 

XLII LIII 

This group of charters relates to Eglesmagril, in a later form 
Exmagirdle, in the parish of Dron, in the south-east of Perthshire. For 
a consideration of the question of the origin of the word and the saint 
whose name has been supposed to be indicated by ' magril,' the reader is 
referred to the discussion (not quite conclusive) by the late Dr. W. F. 
Skene in the Proceedings of the Society of Scottish Antiquaries, vol. iv. 
p. 318. There is a roofless church with a burying-ground, still occa- 
sionally used, close to the old mansion-house of Exmagirdle. 

Some observations on the early Earls of Strathern will be found in the 
Introduction, p. xxxiv, ff. 

Dates. The litigation between Guido, the first abbot, and Abraham, 
Bishop of Dunblane (No. XLII.), shows that the grants of land and of the 
church had been made at an early date. The dispute, which also 
involved questions as to the church of Muthill, was temporarily settled in 
the time of William Malvoisin, Bishop of St. Andrews (1202-1238), and 
in the time of Earl Gilbert (tc. 1223). See also what is said below on 
Simon, prior of St. Andrews, and of John, prior of May, which restricts 
the date to J 21 1-1 214. 

No. XLIII. is obviously of about the same time as No. XLII. 

No. XLIV. is Earl Robert's confirmation of No. XLIII., and is after 
1233 (4th Sept.), when Bishop Clement was consecrated, and before 1256, 
when he died. If Earl Robert died before 1244, the limits are further 
abridged. 

No. XLV. is earlier than the preceding. It is a grant of Abraham, 
Bishop of Dunblane, and is mentioned in the bull of Innocent in., dated 
23rd January 1215. 

Nos. XLVI., XLVII., XLVIII., and XLIX. are also early, and in the lifetime 
of Bishop Abraham (1214-1223). 

No. L. is dated 16th April 1235, and is an amendment of an error in 
the decree arbitral (No. XLII.) of more than ten years before. 

No. LI. is dated 7th May 1235 ; and Nos. LII. and LIII. must be very 
soon after. 

Page 43. Cletheueis (in No. XLIX. Clethues) seems to be now the lands 
of Clavage in the neighbouring parish of Dunning. [A. G.] 

Page 45. Simone et Johanne, prioribus de Sancto Andrea et de May. Simon 
appears in Registrum Prioratus S. Andree only as ' S.' See pp. 316, 317, 
320, 322. He succeeded in 1211, and resigned in 1225 (Fordun, vi. 50). 

John is Prior of May in 1206, and is succeeded before 1214 by 
William. See Dr. John Stuart's Preface to Records of the Priory of the 
Isle of May. 

Magistro Laurencio. This archdeacon of St. Andrews occurs very 
frequently in the writs in the Register of the Priory. 

Dominum Abraham. This supplies us with what seems to be the 
earliest notice of Abraham, Bishop of Dunblane. 



250 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Elphini, prioris de Incheaffran. [Elphin or Elpin, prior of Inchaffray, 

has been hitherto unknown. He appears again in Nos. XLV. and XLIX 

A. G.]. He must come in between Malise and Innocent, who from prior 
was raised to the dignity of abbot by the Papal Legate (Scotichron. 
ix. 36). 

Willelmi bone memorie. The phrase bonae memoriae is ordinarily used 
of deceased persons. We may conjecture that it was added by the scribe 
who engrossed the record. 

XLIII 

Page 47. Bricio persona de Crefe et eius filio Malisio. It must be 
remembered that Brice may not have been in Holy Orders. But even 
if he were, the mention of his son would not at this date have been 
regarded as unusual. The sons of priests are frequent in the records of 
the time ; and several Scottish bishops were such. 

Rogero de Mortimero. This is, presumably, the Roger de Mortimer, 
sheriff of Perth, who in 1209 was sent with a brother of the Temple 
on an embassy to King John of England (Scotichron. viii. 70). He 
appears as a witness to charters of King William in the Registrum Priorat. 
S. Andree, and in Liber de Melros, vol. i. 

XLIV 

Page 48. Domino C. episcopo nostro. Clement, a Dominican friar, was 
consecrated for Dunblane, 4th September 1233 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). 
He died in 1256 (Scotichron. x. ii.) or 1258 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). 
f Our bishop' is a peculiar phrase. It must be remembered that the 
Earls of Strathern were ' patrons ' of Dunblane. See p. 57. 

Malisio persona. Malise, brother of Earl Robert, was parson of Gask 
(No. LIII). 

Malisio filio meo. Afterwards fifth Earl of Strathern. See Introduction, 
p. xxxiv. 

XLV 

This charter is of Bishop Abraham (c. 1214-c. 1224). 

XLVI 

Page 49. Macbeth, Rex scolarum. We find the expression Rex 
scolarum in connection with Muthill in No. XLVII. The editor is not 
acquainted with any other examples of the use of this term. He has 
consulted eminent Irish scholars, who have been unable to find any- 
thing in early Irish literature to illustrate the word as here used. 

Page 49. Coneuetum. Coneveth or Conveth. See also Nos. XLVII. and 
XLVIII. Jamieson considers that the word conveth comes from the Latin 
convictus, eating together, or an entertainment. Murray in the New 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 251 

English Dictionary says, ' Ancient Celtic Law : Ancient Irish, Coinmeadh 
in Tigernach, 1163, Counmedh, . . . billeting/ etc. O'Brien makes 
Comhmheadh equal to ' free quarters.' In modern Gaelic Comaith means 
messing together. Dr. Skene says Conveth came to signify a night's 
meal or refection, given by the occupiers of the land to their superiors 
when passing through their territories, and was due four times a year. 
It is interesting to find Conevet in operation in Perthshire. The Scologs 
and Clerici, on their way perhaps to Abernethy or St. Andrews, got a 
night's board and lodgings, or perhaps for a longer time. [A. G.] 

The editor would only add to Mr. Gibb's note the suggestion that just 
as a procuratio in the ecclesiastical world meant originally an entertain- 
ment of bed and board given to the bishop or archdeacon on his visitation, 
and was soon commuted for an allowance in money, so perhaps in the 
cases referred to in these charters Conveth had been commuted into a 
charge on the lands. 

Drumendufelis. Place unknown. [A. G.] 

XLVIII 

Page 50. Clerici de Methfyn. Perhaps students or scholars as in 
Nos. XLVI. and XLVII. See Introduction, p. liv. 

L 

Dated, 16th April 1235. 

Page 52. Willelmus . . . episcopus . . . Glasguenses. William de 
Bondington, Chancellor of the king in 1231 (Scotichron. ix. 48); 
elected to Glasgow, 1232 (ibid.) ; consecrated at Glasgow, llth September 
1233 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.) ; died 10th November 1258 (ibid, s.a.) 

Gregorius : Gregory ix. This mandate does not appear in Mr. Bliss's 
Calendar of Papal Registers. But it may be mentioned as a confirmation 
of the genuineness of the document dated at Perugia, 3rd November 
1234, that while the Papal writs of the earlier part of 1234 are dated from 
the Lateran, we find that towards the end of October the Pope had moved 
to Perugia, where he seems to have remained till at least the middle of 
July 1235. See Calendar oj Papal Registers, vol. i. pp. 141-148. 

Page 53. Venerabili viro Episcopo Sancti Andree. The Bishop of St. 
Andrews at this date was William Malvoisine, who died 9th July 1238. 

Apud Lyston. Listun, or Liston, was a parish in the Deanery of 
Linlithgow (Regist. Priorat. 8. Andree, p. 29). 

Perhaps this is the place called at a later period Temple-Liston, now 
Kirkliston, in the shire of Linlithgow. [A, G.] 

LI 

Dated, 7th May 1235. 

Page 55. Clemens Episcopus. Bishop of Dunblane, 4th September 1233- 
1256 or 1258. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

R. Abbas. This is the R[obert], abbot of Arbroath, in No. LII. 
Perhaps he was the same Robert who, in 1267, was expelled by the 
monks, and appealed to the Apostolic See (Scotichr. x. 21). There is 
a charter of Abbot Robert, dated 1261, in Regist. Priorat. 8. Andree, 
p. 287. For the history of the succession of the abbots of Arbroath our 
charter is valuable. 

/. Abbas. This is the J. [nnocent?], abbot of Inchaffray, of No. LII. 

P. Abbas. The abbot of Cambuskenneth. See No. LII. There was 
a ' Peter,' abbot of Charnbuskenel, in 1240 (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, 
p. 162), probably the person who subscribed this charter. 

Hugo, Abbas de Sancto Seruano. This is an abbot of St. Serfs, 
Culross. This entry will serve to correct a date in Walcott's Ancient 
Church of Scotland, p. 271. The religious house of St. Serf in Lochleven 
was only a priory. 

Vicarius ecclesie de Methel. The parish was in the deanery of Fothri, 
and the name appears as Methkil in Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, p. 33, 
and in Theiner's Monumenta, p. 110. 

LII 

Date. Shortly after that of No. LI. 

Page 57. Patroni nostri. See Introduction, p. xxxviii. 

The confirmation by the whole clergy of the diocese as distinct from 
that of the chapter (No. LIII.) is interesting. The abbots of Arbroath, 
Culross, and Cambuskenneth appear perhaps as holding churches in 
the diocese or canonries in the cathedral. 1 

LIII 

Probably soon after No. LI. 

If bone memorie (p. 58) was not inserted afterwards, it must be dated 
after the death of William, Bishop of St. Andrews, 9th July 1238. 

LIV 

This charter is dated 7th April 1239. 
For the place-names, see p. 244. 

Page 59. De novalibus suis et de nutrimentis animalium suorum. See 
Introduction, p. xxxviii. 

Ad mensam . . . Dumblanensis episcopi. The incomes of the bishops 
were augmented by parish churches being conferred on them, the free 
incomes of which, after providing for the priest in charge of the parish, 

1 The abbot of Cambuskenneth appears as a prebendary of Dunblane in 1298, 
and the abbot of Arbroath in 1240. Walcott gives the churches of Abernethy, 
Abruthven, and Bondington as belonging to Arbroath ; and Tullecuttrie, 
Lecroft, and Kincardine, St. Lathan to Cambuskenneth ( The Ancient Church 
of Scotland, p. 206). He does not notice any church as belonging to Culross. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 253 

went to the bishop. Such churches were called 'mensal.' In some 
dioceses such a disposal of parishes was extensive. Thus in Moray some 
eleven or twelve parishes were ( mensal ' of the bishop. 

Quocunque nomine censeantur. Ordinarily tithes were divided into 
' great' and ' small/ the great tithes, or 'garbal tithes/ being the tithe 
of grain, and the small tithes the tithe of lambs and calves, milk, butter, 
cheese, eggs, etc. Very commonly the great tithes went to the rector 
or the corporate body (in the case of appropriate churches) representing 
the rector, while the small tithes went to the vicar. In the present 
case it was agreed that tithes of all kinds out of the lands of Fedal, 
Beny, and Concrag, in the parish of Muthill, should go to Lindores, and 
that Lindores was to pay to the parish churches six marks yearly. 

H. abbate de insula missarum. This charter adds a name hitherto 
unknown to the abbots of Inchaffray. He comes in between Innocent 
and Alan. 

Dompno W. Decano Dumblanensi . . . Dompno Adam priore de 
Abberbrodoc. The form ' Domnus ' or ' Dompnus/ rather than e Dominus/ 
was affected by some. For the reasons, see Ducange s. v. Domnus. 

Andrea priore de Abernythyn. That is prior of the Keledei of Aber- 
nythyn. See the witnesses of No. LI. 

Gask crist. Probably Gask Christi, presumably what is now Trinity 
Gask. It is not uncommon to find churches dedicated to the Trinity, 
commonly called Christ Church. 

LV 

Dated 30th August 1245. 

The original is in the Denmyln Charters (29) in the Advocates' 
Library. From this the text was printed by Mr. Turnbull (Lib. S. Marie, 
etc., p. 42), with the extraordinary error in the date of e tercentissimo.' 
The date in the original is written exactly as in our Chartulary. 

This charter is helpful towards determining the position of Rathmuriel. 

Page 61. William of Brechin, son of Henry of Brechin (Earl David's 
son). He was one of the fifteen regents and guardians during the 
minority of Alexander in., appointed at Roxburgh (1255). 

Johanne de Haya. Probably Sir John de Haya of Ardnaughton, 
ancestor of the Hays of Naughton, in Fife, and son of William de Haya, 
first of Errol on record. [A. G.] 

Gilbertode Haya. Probably third of Errol; witnesses a charter by 
Alexander in. to the Priory of St. Andrews, 1250-51. [A. G.] 

Willelmo de Haya de Balcolmi. Unknown ; perhaps son of the first 
William of Errol. [A. G.] 

Willelmo de Haya. Brother of the above Gilbert as here stated. On 
29th April 1251 William de Haya had a charter confirming two carrucates 
of land in Errol made by Gilbert, his brother. [A. G,] 

Henrico de Dundemor. See pp. Ixx, 240. 

Militibus meis. See Introduction, pp. Ixxiii-lxxvi. 



254 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

LVI 

Date. Perhaps about the middle of the thirteenth century. 

Among the witnesses is Norman, son of Norman (the constable). The 
following document relating to the grantor of the present charter is 
dated 1252. 

Simon de Garentuly. See ante, p. 241. 

Ederlarg. Edderlick lies in the parish of Premnay. In a charter of 
1000 it is called Etherlik. [A. G.] 

LVII 

Dated 7th July 1250. 

Page 62. Creymund (Cremond, LVIII.). Hill of Crimond, and Nether 
Crimond appear, in the ordnance map, in the parish of Keithhall and 
Kinkell. [A. G.] 

Edengerroke. There is now an Edingarrach in the parish of Premnay; 
and this Edengerroke (though mentioned along with Creymond) is 
probably the same place. [A. G.] 

Tolaukery (Tholachkere). Tillykerrie lies just across the march in the 
parish of Fintray. [A. G.] 

Sir Simon of Garentuly, the grantor, witnesses a charter on 25th 
August 1243 (No. LXXXIII.). 

LVIII 

Date. In the time of Abbot John, that is 1218-c. 1244. 
On private chapels, see Introduction, pp. Ixviii-lxxiii. 

LIX 

Date. f G.', Bishop of Aberdeen, one of the witnesses, must be Gilbert 
of Stirling, who was elected in 1228 or 1229, and died in 1238 or 
1239. 

Page 65. Sancti Drostani de Inchemabani. For St. Drostan, see Forbes's 
Kalendar of Scottish Saints, pp. 326-7. 

Ravengille. The name has perished. [A. G.] 

Gillandreston : now Glanderston in the parish of Kennethmont, near 
the march of Insch. [A. G.] 

Weredors : now Wardhouse. The site of the castle is marked in the 
parish of Insch. [A. G.] 

' Animalia,' like the old French aumailles, is often used in the restricted 
sense of kine or oxen. Compare Regist. Aberdon. i. 209 . . . 'cum 
pastura unius jumenti, unius porci, duodecim animalium, et quadraginta 
ovium ' ; and Chartulary of Coldstream, 25 ' . . . communem pasturam de 
Thornidiche ad xl. equas et earum sequelas . . . et ad octoginta animalia, 
et octoginta porcos, et ad ducentas oves.' 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 255 

LX 

Date, After 1218, when G[regory], Bishop of Brechin, was elect. The 
date of Gregory's death is unascertained. He was Bishop of Brechin till 
at least 1242. 

The date of Henry of Brechin's death is uncertain. 

Page 66. Julians sponse mee. In 1204 King John was promised hy 
Karl David 1000 marks for granting him the marriage of the great heiress 
Matilda de Cauz for his son Henry. 1 Mr. Bain assumes, perhaps rightly, 
that this Henry was Henry of Brechin. The marriage was not effected 
and John remitted the fine. In July of the following year King John 
commanded Reginald de Cornhill to give to Henry, son of Earl David, 
or his authorised messenger the daughter and heiress of Half de Cornhill 
whom he (the king) has given with the land pertaining to her to the said 
Henry. 2 This lady is presumably the ' Juliana ' of our charter. 

LXI 

Date. The charter belongs to the time of David de Bernham, Bishop of 
St. Andrews. 

Page 67. Adfestum sancti martini in hyeme. In this familiar formula 
designating Martinmas term the words in hyeme appear to distinguish 
this feast (Nov. 11) from the feast of St. Martin's translation (July 4). 
The latter is found as a feast of nine lections in the Aberdeen Breviary. 

LXII 

Date. Third Sunday in Lent (22nd March) 1248. 

Page 68. David dei gracia episcopi Sancti Andree. David de Bernham, 
Bishop of St. Andrews ; consecrated 22nd January 1239-40 ; died 26th 
April 1263 (Fordun, vi. 42). 

Page 69. Inchemurthach. One of the manors or palaces of the Bishop of 
St. Andrews ; now Inchmurdo, near Boarhills in Fife. Bishop William 
Malvoisine died at this house, as did also Bishop Gameline. 

Dominica qua cantatur oculi met. The Third Sunday in Lent was 
known as oculi mei (or simply as oculi) so called from the beginning of 
the 'office* (or introit) of the Mass on that day, which consisted of two 
verses from Psalm xxiv. (A.V. Psalm xxv. 15, 16). See Missale de 
Arbuthnott, p. 86. 

William of Brechin survived till near 1300. [A. G.] 

LXIII 

Date. 2nd June 1248. 

Page 69. Dundemor. In the parish of Ebedyn (Abdie), now Dunmore. 



Bain's Calendar, i. No. 334. 2 Ibid. No. 365. 



256 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

The bull of Innocent in. among the pertinents of the church of Lindores 
mentions 'capellas de Dundemor' (p. 108). 1 See Introduction, p. Ixx. 

Dominum Henricum de Dundemor. Some notices of the Dundemores 
of Dundemore will be found in Laing's Lindores Abbey, pp. 85, 434, 435, 
474, 475. 

Page 70. Officialis Sancti Andree. The ' official ' was the judge ordinary 
in the bishop's court. 

LXIV 

Date, llth May 1253, nearly five years after the ordinance of the synod 
at Perth directing the monastery to find once ' the required ornamenta 
of the chapel of Dundemor. It will be noted that in the interval 
Sir John has succeeded Sir Henry, an important date in the family 
history. 

Page 71. Missale. On this book, remarkable in liturgical bibliography, 
see Introduction, p % Ixx, note 5. 

Page 72. Vestimentum plenarium. This expression is often employed 
to denote not only the chasuble of the celebrant and the stole, maniple, 
etc., but also the vestures of the deacon and subdeacon. But it is 
scarcely probable that at the chapel the celebrant was so assisted, at least 
on ordinary occasions. 

LXV 

Date. The chief clue is that Henry of Stirling, Earl David's son, is 
still alive. 

Page 72. Monorgrund is a farm or farms called Monorgan, at Forgrund, 
now Langforgan, in the Carse of Gowrie. Moine [Fhjorgrund would mean 
the moss or marsh of Forgrund. [A. G.] 

LXVI 

Date. John de Haya is the grantor. Among the witnesses are David 
de Haya, and his brother, Robert de Haya, all doubtless of the family 
of the Hays of Errol. See above, p. 247. Nos. LXXVI.-LXXIX. give us 
three brothers, David, Robert, and Malcolm, with Gilbert, son of the 
first, and Nicholas, son of Gilbert, and Robert, a nephew of Gilbert, and 
apparently another David (No. LXXIX.). Earl Malise of Strathern is a 
contemporary of the first Gilbert (No. LXXVIII.). Thomas de Haya, 
brother of David, appears in No. xxxvn. 

LXVII 

Date. The material for forming a decisive judgment is wanting. The 



1 The text of the bull as printed by Baluze, Innocentii III. Opera, i. 337, 
reads ' Bundamer,' an obvious error. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 257 

editor suspects this may be a very early charter granted, perhaps, by 
one of the English followers or servants of Earl David. One Richard 
de Leicestria witnesses a charter of Roger de Beaumont while he was 
' elect of St. Andrews/ that is, between 13th April 1189 (Chron. de Mailr. 
s.a.) and 15th February 1198 (ibid. s.a. ; Fordun, vi. 42). His name 
appears towards the end of a group of inferior witnesses, such as ' Hugo 
de pincerna,' ' Aldred pistor/ etc. (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, p. 153). 
Our Richard de Leycestre may have been the same person. Among the 
witnesses is ( John de la Batayle.' Norman sobriquets survived indeed 
after the time of Earl David, but they were common at an early period. 

Page 74. Johanne filio Leue. This person had a toft in Perth (No. 
LXXIV.). Perhaps a burgess. 

LXVIII 

Date. Sir Henry of Stirling, son of Earl David, is a witness. 

Page 74. Rogerus de Berkeley. The name Berkeley (Berclay and many 
other spellings) is frequent in charters of the date of Malcolm, William 
the Lion, and Alexander n. But the editor has not come across ' Roger.' 
Several members of the family of Berkeley figure in the later history of 
Scotland. See Scotichronicon, Exchequer Rolls, Register of the Great Seal, 
etc. 

Forgrund (Forgrunt). From the text it appears that this land was 
near Exmagirdle. The name Forgan, a village in the parish of Forgan- 
denny, is the modern form of the word. Mr. A. Gibb has independently 
come to the same conclusion. 

Page 75. Meo maro. The marus was an officer who executed the 
summons of his lord's courts. See Regiam Majestatem, lib. i. cap. vi. 7, 
and lib. iv. cap. viij. 3 ; Skene's De Verborum significatione, s.v. 

LXIX 

Date. Roger de Berkeley. See No. LXVIII. 

Page 75. De dimidia petra cere firmitatis. The word (or words) of the 
rubric represented in the printed text by ' firmitatis' is blurred. A con- 
jectural reading 'firme terre' has been suggested ; but it will not agree 
with what remains tolerably distinct in the lettering. Ducange (s.v. 
firmitas) gives examples of the use of the word in the sense of f surety/ 
' security/ ' confirmation ' ; l and in this sense the passage might mean 
' half-a-stone of wax given as a symbol of confirmation,' but confirmation 
of what? Of the preceding grant (No. LXVIII.)? Certainly half-a-stone 
of wax was a small grant, unless it were taken as symbolical. Mr. 
Gibb has, independently, suggested f firma terre'; and adds that the 



1 Thus from Theodorus Campedonensis de S. Magno, ' Dedit ei totum ipsum 
saltum cum marcha firmitatis, quae in epistola sua fecit conscribi.' 

R 



258 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

scribe may have erroneously written 'firmitatis' for 'firme terre.' But 
one would expect 'de firma terre.' 

LXX 

Date. In the time of William Malvoisine, Bishop of St. Andrews 
(1202-1238), which is narrowed by Abraham being Bishop of Dunblane 
(1216P-1224?). 

Page 76. Reginaldus de Warenna. He has brothers, Adam and Roger, 
among the witnesses (Nos. LXX., LXXII.), and a nephew (or ? grandson, 
nepotem) Adam (No. LXXI.). This Adam has a brother David and a nepos 
called John. Reginald is styled ' Dominus' (No. LXVIII.). 

Decano de Perth, that is ( dean of Christianity,' or rural dean. 

LXXI 

Date. Probably a little later than No. LXX. 

On the family, Reginald de Warrenne, see notes on No. LXX. 

LXXII 

Date. Probably later than LXX. 

Page 78. Dunbernyn, Dunbarny. 

Petcathelin, Pitcaithly. 

W. preposito nostro. There is no clue as to the place of which W. 
was provost. The word nostro suggests the conjecture that the deed 
was drawn by one of the monks of Lindores, and that W. was provost of 
Newburgh, elsewhere styled ' our burgh,' while the townsmen are called 
' our burgesses of Newburgh ' (No. CLII. ). 

LXXIII 

Date. The materials do not enable us to be very precise. The charter 
was granted in the time of Abbot John (1219 after 1242). But Alan 
Durward first appears as Earl of Athol in a confirmation of a deed of gift 
to Arbroath, 12th October 1233. He succeeded to the earldom by right 
of his marriage with the eldest daughter of Earl Henry, who is ' quondam 
Comes de Athoyle' at the date of this charter. But Earl Henry may 
have died some time before 1233 ; and Conan's grant may have been 
some years after his death. 

Page 79. Conanus must have been an illegitimate son of Earl Henry, 
for the succession followed in the female line. [A. G.] 

Coningus de Glenerochy (designed son of Henry, Earl of Athol), made 
a grant to the abbey of Cupar of the use of his wood at Glenorchy, and 
also of Tulloch (The Earldom of Athol, by J. A. Robertson, p. 18). 
Mr. Robertson dates the charter making this grant c. 1216. Tulloch, 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 259 

in a Retour (1672) of Robert Stewart of Tulloch, is said to be in the 
lordship of Cupar and earldom of Atholl. One of the Tullochs lies 
directly opposite Blair. [A. G.]. Conan's son Ewyn is a witness, and 
so is Hath, son of Gilbrid, his son-in-law. 

It may be well to transcribe a summary of the charter referred to by 
Mr. Robertson, as cited above by Mr. Gibb. This summary is printed in 
l)r. Rogers's Rental Book of the Cistercian Abbey of Cupar Angus (i. 334), 
taken from the manuscript Breviarium Antiqui Registri Monasterii de 
Cupro in Anegus in the Advocates' Library : ' Carta donationis Cumingi, 
filii Henrici comitis Atholiae, Deo, Sanctae Mariae, et monachis de 
Cupro, de asiamenta [? asiamentis] bosci mei de toto Glenherthy et de 
Tolikyne. Testibus Domino Roberto de Haya, Johanne Capellano eius, 
Magistri Johanne phisico, et Petro clerico eius.' 

Ligna que dicuntur Wrawes de bule et de auhne. The difficulty of 
interpreting this perplexing passage was laid by the editor before Dr. 
T. G. Law, who speedily enlisted the services of quite a considerable body 
of charter-scholars. It must suffice here to note what seem to the editor 
the most probable of the conjectures offered. There was almost a com- 
plete consensus of opinion that ' auhne' is nothing else than the French 
aune, the alder. On ' bule ' there is more variety of opinion ; but there 
seems little doubt that, as suggested by Dr. J. Maitland Thomson and 
Rev. John Anderson, it is the birch-tree (bouleau : the form boul being 
given by Godefroy). The main difficulty lies in the word ' wrawes ' ; and 
though various conjectures, more or less attractive, have been offered, 
the editor prefers to leave the word for the investigation of others. The 
Rev. J. Wilson, vicar of Dalston, has been kind enough to furnish, as 
illustrative of bule, ' felies de bulo pro biga' : Finchale Accounts. 

LXXIV 

Date. Uncertain. 

Page 80. Malcolmus de Kinspinithin. He had land in the town of 
St. Andrews (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, p. 285). 

Kinespinedyn and Kinspinithin : now Kilspindy. [A. G.] 

LXXV 

Date. Probably at the close of the twelfth or early in the thirteenth 
century. See below. 

Page 81. Willelmus de Munford. We find a William de Munfort 
witnessing a charter of the ( Countess Ada, mother of the King of Scots' 
(Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, p. 209). This must be Ada, daughter of 
William, Eai'l of Warrenne, widow of Earl Henry, son of David i. She 
died in 1178 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). William Mumfort witnesses a 
charter of King William, when Matthew was Bishop of Aberdeen (2nd 
April H72-20th August 1199). If this person is the grantor of the 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

present charter, we get some notion as to its date, which must have 
been early in the history of the abbey. 

Muuford seems to be a form of Montford (de Monteforti). 

LXXVI 

Date. Perhaps before 1215. See confirmation of Innocent in. (No. 
xcv.), where a fishery ( in Sabulo ' is mentioned. Sir David de Haya, the 
second of Errol, succeeded his father William before 1199, and was alive 
in 1237. [A. G.] 

This charter is printed from an inferior and imperfect text by 
Turnbull in Liber S. Marie de Lundoris, p. 9. 

Page 81. Glasbani (Glesbanyn, Glesbanin). Clashbennie on the north 
bank of the Tay, nearly opposite Lindores. 

Rugesablyn (Rugesabluri). Not identified. The word suggests that it 
represents a Norman-French equivalent of Red-sands. [These red sands 
may have given its name to the Isle of Red Inch. A. G.] 

Page 82. Colcric. Not identified. 

This and the three following charters give us three brothers, Sir David, 
Robert, and Malcolm de Haya (LXXVI., LXXVII.). David was twice married, 
first to Ethna, secondly to Eva (LXXVI.). [This charter enables the peer- 
age books to be corrected, where his wife is called Helen. A. G.] His 
son, who succeeds him, is Gilbert, whose wife is Edoyna (LXXVIII.). 
Robert and Malcolm are described as rectors of the church of Errol 
(LXXIX.). They are succeeded in the rectorial rights by (another) David, 
perhaps a brother of Gilbert (ibid.). Lastly, Gilbert styles Malise of 
Strathern ' consanguineus meus' (LXXVIII.). Gilbert, son of David, 
second of Errol, has a son Nicholas (No. LXXVIII.). 

In the account of this family given by Douglas (Peerage, vol i. p. 544), 
we learn that the first known of the family was William de Haya, 
' pincerna regis ' in the time of Malcolm iv. To his eldest son, David, 
King William, the Lion, granted, between 1189 and 1199, the lands of 
Errol. This David is the first David of our charters. His mother was 
Helen, daughter of Gilbert, Earl of Strathern. It is presumably thus 
that Malise of Strathern, afterwards earl, was c cousin' of Gilbert de 
Haya. 

LXXVII 

Date. About the same date as last. The witnesses are almost the 
same. 

Robertus de Bay a et Malcolmus f rater ejus. From No. LXXIX. we learn 
that these brothers were rectors of the church of Errol, and so entitled 
to the tithes which they granted to Lindores. It seems as if they con- 
jointly held the rectorial rights. In connection with this, reference may 
be made to the constitutions of Cardinal Otho (in London, 1237) that 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 261 

' for the future ' (de caetero} there should not be more than one parson 
(i.e. rector) for each church (Wilkins, Concilia, i. 652). It is quite 
likely that neither Robert nor Malcolm was in Holy Orders, a case 
contemplated in express terms in the constitution referred to. 



LXXVIII 

Date. Probably on Gilbert de Haya succeeding his father, David, whose 
charter (No. LXXVI.) is here confirmed, together with the additional grant 
of the third part of the fishings of the draw-nets at Joymersandes (not 
identified). 

Ricardo Cumyn filio Ricardi Cumyn. Two generations of Cumin. 
Probably there should be two Richards. [A. G.] 

Nicholao filio meo. Nicholas succeeded his father in Errol. [A. G.] 

Roberto de Haya nepote meo. The uncertainty attaching to 'nepos' 
makes it impossible to say what was the relation of this witness to Sir 
Gilbert. 

The wife of Sir Gilbert is said to have been a daughter of William 
Cumin, Earl of Buchan. This charter gives her name, 'Edoyna.' 
[A. G.] 

LXXIX 

Date. Probably on David de Haya succeeding Robert and Malcolm in 
the rectory of Errol. This is a confirmation of No. LXVII., with the 
addition of the grant of the tithe of the monks' draw-nets at Joymersandes. 
This place has not been identified. 



LXXX 

Dated, 4th July 1251. 

Page 85. Alanus Ostiarius, Justiciarius Scocie. Alan Durward was 
made Justiciar of Scotland in 1243 (Scotichron. lib. ix. cap. 61). It would 
seem that later in this year (1251), or early in 1252, Durward was 
deprived of his office of Justiciar ; but he was restored in 1255. 

Margerie. Durward's wife, Margery, was a natural daughter of 
Alexander 11. At the end of the year 1251, there was suspicion that 
Durward had sought her legitimation that he might become heir in 
succession to the throne (Scotichron. x. 4). 

P. del gracia episcopi Aberdonensis. Peter de Ramsay, Bishop of 
Aberdeen (1247-1256, Melrose Chronicle; or 1257 Scotichron. x. 11). 

Page 86. Klnnerny. Is this Kinnernie in the parish of Midmar ? 
Johanne excommunicato. A nickname based, no doubt, on the man 
having been at one time excommunicated. 



262 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

LXXXI 

Date. In the time of John, Bishop of Aberdeen (1200-1207). 

Page 88. Normannus. The Constable (No. xv.) of Inverury Castle. 
His son Norman is the grantor of No. LXXXIV. 

A. uxoris mee. A MS. (1695), of doubtful value, on the Sirname of 
Lessley, from which Macfarlane makes extracts, describes this Norman's 
wife as a daughter of the Lord of Lorn (Genealogical Collections, Scottish 
History Society, vol. ii. p. 424). 

Confining attention to our charters we find mention of four 
generations : 

(1) Bertolf, referred to as father of Malcolm (No. xiii.). 

(2) Malcolm (No. xm.) before 1195. ' 

(3) Norman, son of Malcolm, called theConstable (Nos. LXXXI., LXXXII.). 
He has a brother, Malcolm (No. LVI). 

(4) Norman, son of Norman, (Nos. LVI., LXXXIII., LXXXIV.). 

LXXXII 

Date. Soon after LXXXI., and before the death of John, Bishop of 
Aberdeen (1207). 

LXXXIII 

Dated, 25th August 1243, 

Page 90. Radulfo Aberdonensi episcopo. Ralph de Lambley (1239- 
1247). 

LXXXIV 

Dated, 12th July 1253. 

Normannus de Lescelin filius Normanni constabularii. This will 
correct Macfarlane (Genealogical Collections) ii. 455), who makes this 
Norman the son of Alfornus, who (according to Macfarlane) was suc- 
cessor of Norman, son of Malcolm, son of Bartholff. It is possible that 
Alfornus (as an elder brother) intervened between the two Normans. 
The charter, cited by Macfarlane, as of Alexander in., must be a 
charter of Alexander ii. ; and its date must be 4th December 1247^ the 
very first day of the thirty-fourth year of that monarch. 

Of the second Norman, Macfarlane (ibid.} writes that it was ' he who, I 
apprehend, first assumed the Sirname from the lands of Lessly in the 
Garrioch.' 



1 Earl David's grant of Lessly n to Malcolm 'filio Bartholf will be found in 
Collections on the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, pp. 546-7, The grant is before 
1199. It is confirmed by Earl John of Huntingdon, 1219-1232 (ibid.). 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

Page 91. Omnem sequelam. See Introduction, p. Ivii. 

Andrea de Lescelin. This is an early Sir Andrew of Leslie. Andrew- 
was afterwards a frequent name among the Leslies. 

Willelmo Theyno de Kintor. The property of Thainston exhibits a 
survival of the term thanage applied to the royal lands of Kintore. 

LXXXV 

Date. Before 8th March 1195, for the grant is recorded in Celestine's 
bull (p. 104). 

Robertus de Lundoniis. See Notes on No. u. 

Inverkaithin. It is observable that Robert styles Inverkeithing f my 
burgh. ' 

Page 92. Comite Patricio. Earl of Dunbar. The first named Patrick. 
He succeeded his father, Earl Waldeve, in 1182 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.). 
He was married to Ada, illegitimate daughter of William, the Lion. He 
was a generous benefactor of the Church, and died, in the dress of a monk, 
in 1232 (ibid, s.a.) 

Simone de Seyntliz. Simon (in.) de Senliz, Earl of Northampton, is 
said to have had a brother Simon (Nicolas's Historic Peerage of England, 
p. 415) ; perhaps our witness. 

LXXXVI 

Date. Time of Earl David, probably before 1215. 

Willelmus de Camera. [Unknown : de Camera is the older form of the 
word Chalmers, later Chambers. A. G.] He refers to Earl David as 
f dominus meus,' and presumably held land of him. Hamildune is 
mentioned in the bull of Innocent in. of 23rd January 1215 as a 
possession of Lindores. 

Hamildune. [Unknown. A. G.] It is possible that/this is an English 
Hamilton, Hambleden, or Hambleton. In Rutlandshire there is 
Hambleton, Middle Hambleton, and Nether Hambleton. One of the 
latter two is marked as * Little Hambleton ' in the map of Rutlandshire 
in Gibson's edition of Camden's Britannia. Little regard is had in the 
papal writs to the grouping of names, and the fact that the bull of 
Innocent in. places the possession in the order ' Ratengoden, Neutile, 
Hameldune, et Mernes' must not be considered as conclusive against the 
above conjecture as to its being in Rutlandshire, where Earl David had 
possessions. No. xciu. supplies an example of the disregard of locality 
in the papal records of possession. After eight of the Aberdeenshire 
churches are mentioned Conington in the diocese of Lincoln appears, and 
immediately after Kinnethmont in Aberdeenshire. 

Page 93. Constantino de Mortemer. We find Constantino de Mortemer 
witnessing charters of Earl David (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, pp. 237, 
238). 



264 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

LXXXVII 

Date. Between 1232, when John succeeded to the earldom of Chester, 
and 5th June 1237, when he died. 

Stokes. (Stoke, LXXXVIII. ) lies south of Market-Bosworth in Leicester- 
shire. [A. G.] 

Willelmus de Campania. (Champneys, or Champaingne. ) 

Page 94. Domino Anhetyn. Perhaps Sir Anketill de Foleville who 
appears as a witness (No. xc.). 

LXXXVIII 

Dated, 17th June 1248. 

Turleston. There is a parish of Thurlaston in Leicestershire. It is 
spelt Thurleston in Morden's map in Camden's Britannia. 

Quadraginta solidos argenti ; the three marks of the preceding writ. 

Domino Alano tune celarario de Suleby. The abbey of Sulby, in North- 
amptonshire, was of Premonstratensian monks. The cellarer was a 
monastic officer of large power and influence, whose duties extended 
far beyond the cellar of the house. On account of the practical business 
habits acquired in office the cellarer was not infrequently elected to the 
post of abbot. 

Henrico lefrankeleyn de Norhamton. The English franklin held direct 
of the Crown. He was ordinarily of English (as distinguished from 
Norman) origin, and a man of good estate. 

LXXXIX 

Date. The time of Abbot Thomas, who died in 1273. The date of his 
appointment is unknown, but it was after 1244. 

Page 95. Laurencio de monte alto clerico. We find ' Dominus Laurencius 
de Montealto' [Mowat. A. G.] witnessing in 1267, or somewhat earlier, 
the foundation charter of the Messyndew (Maison Dieu) at Brechin, 
granted by William of Brechin (Regist. Brechin, p. 7). Dundee was in 
the diocese of Brechiu. 

On the places, see notes on No. xix. 

XC 

This, with some unimportant variations in the spelling of proper 
names, is a repetition of No. xix., which see. 

XCI 

Date. The time of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winton (1220-1264;. 
Perhaps shortly before the dates of the group of charters (Nos. 
CXLI.-CXLVI) with which it is connected ; that is about 1262. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 265 

Page 98. Ade de Malcharwiston. Adam witnesses charters in the time 
of David de Bernham and Gamelin, Bishops of St. Andrews (Regist. 
Priorat. S. Andree). See Notes on CXLI. 

XCII 

Dated, 24th June 1375. 

On this charter, see Introduction, p. xlv. 

XCIII 

Dated, 8th March 1195. 
See Introduction, p. Ixxvi. 

Page 105. Duos bisancios. In 1282 we find Pope Martin iv. sending 
Master Geoffrey de Vegano as nuncio to collect cess and other dues. 
St. Thomas's monastery at Arbroath has to pay 2 bezants; Lindores, 
2 bezants ; Kelso, 1 mark, etc. (Calendar of Papal Registers : Letters, 
i. 476). 

XCIV 

This bull was printed by Baluze in his Papae Innocentii III. Opera (Paris, 
1682), i. 337, and from that source was reprinted by Turnbull in the 
appendix to his Liber S. Marie de Lundoris (p. 39). The variants in 
the text are mostly unimportant, the text of our Chartulary being 
obviously preferable. Thus ' Bundamer ' appears for ' Dundemor ' ; 
1 Mineth ' for ' Moneth ' (the Mounth) ; ( Cuningrove ' (which gave 
Mr. Alex. Laing much fruitless trouble in the endeavour to identify 
the place) for ' Cuningtone,' in the diocese of Lincoln ; ' Ritcheth ' for 
' Rothket.' Baluze did not print the subscription of the cardinals. 
With the help of Chacon (Ciaconius) in his Vitae et Res Gestae Pontificum 
Romanorum et S. R. E. Cardinalium, with the notes Agostino Oldoini 
(Romae, 1677), every name has been identified ; but it would be burden- 
ing these pages to notice the histories of these numerous cardinals. The 
reader, however, may be cautioned against identifying Pandulphus, 
cardinal-presbyter of the Basilica of the Twelve Apostles, with Pandul- 
phus, the Papal Nuncio, to whom King John, of England, did homage 
in 1213. Matthew of Westminster and, long afterwards, Bishop Godwin 
fell into this error. 

Bobo was cardinal-deacon of St. Theodorus (not, as by error, in our 
Chartulary, St. Theodorius). 

xcv 

This bull (dated 1st February 1214-15) affords some details of the gift 
of Malise, brother of Gilbert, Earl of Strathern, ' meal and malt, cheeses 
and swine,' not elsewhere recorded ; and establishes the early date of the 
benefactions of Malise. 



266 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 
XCVI-XCVII 

Of the dispute here referred to we have no other notice. Earl David's 
gift (No. v. ) safeguarded the f cane ' of the Bishop of St. Andrews. 

XCVIII 

This bull is printed, from the copy in the Advocates' Library, by Mr. 
Turnbull, in Liber S. Marie de Lundoris, p. 18. No doubt the copy 
referred to is correct in giving ' filiis ' after ' dilectis ' in the first line of 
our bull (p. 116). On the other hand our text is more likely to be 
correct in reading (line 7) ' postulacionibus ' for ' petitionibus/ and in 
reading (line 9) ' vacatis ' for f vacatur.' Turnbull's 'ad earn 'should of 
course, be ' ad eum' as in our print. 

Turnbull prints (p. 17) an instrument of Gregory, Bishop of Brechin, 
in which he states that with the assent of his whole chapter he puts the 
abbot and convent of Lindores into corporal possession of the church of 
Dundee, reserving for the vicar 10 Ibs. sterling. The grant is obviously 
only a continuation of the grants of his predecessors Turpin, Ralph, and 
Hugh. Bishop Gregory's grant must be dated before 1226. In connec- 
tion with No. xcix. it may be noted that Bishop Gregory's charter is 
witnessed by ( M. priore Keledeorum de Brechin.' 

XCIX 

Dated, 18th February 1250. 

This bull marks the substitution of secular canons for Keledei as the 
chapter of Brechin. The older writs in the times of Bishops Turpin 
Ralph and Hugh had, presumably, mentioned that the concession of 
the Bishop of Brechin had been with the consent of the Keledei, and it 
is plain from the next bull (No. c.) that difficulties had been raised 
because the name of the members of the chapter was now no longer 
Keledei. 



Dated, 20th April 1250. According to a common practice the Pope 
commissions certain ecclesiastics, presumably disinterested, to give 
effect to his ruling as expressed in No. xcix. 

CI 

This in order of time precedes Nos. xcix. and c. It is dated 4th 
December 1248, and is a general confirmation of the possessions of the 
abbey. 

CII 

Dated two days later than the last. See Introduction, p. 1. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 267 

cm 

Dated, seven days later than No. c. The violence and lawlessness 
described is remarkable. More light on the particular occasions of these 
offences is lacking. 

CIV 

Dated as No. cm. Commission is given to the same two ecclesiastics 
as in No. c. to give effect to the Pope's ruling in No. cm. 

cv 

Dated as No. c. 

CVI 

Dated as No. c. 

It will be noticed that all the above bulls of Innocent iv. are dated 
from Lyons. He had fled there in 1244 from the vengeance of the 
Emperor Frederick, and continued to reside mainly in that city till 
April 1251. 

CVII 

Date. Roger de Beaumont was consecrated 15th February 1198, and died 
7th July 1202. There is uncertainty as to the date of the consecration 
of John, Bishop of Aberdeen, but it is probable that it was not till 1200 
or 1201. Radulph, Bishop of Brechin, was not consecrated till 1202 
(C'hron. de Mailros, s.a.). Osbert, abbot of Kelso, died in 1203 
(Chron de Mailr. s.a.). The charter must belong to the first half of 
the year 1202. 

Page 129. Personatum. The rights of the persona, which term is applied 
to the rector, as distinguished from the vicar. 

Conrediis. The word conredium (which appears also in the forms 
conradium, corredum, corodium, etc.) was an allowance of meat and 
drink, or its equivalent in money, made to persons not being members 
of the house. The word was also applied to grants demanded by the 
bishop ; and to special demands made in England by the king upon the 
religious houses of his realm. On these and other applications of the 
term, see W. W. Capes, The English Church in the Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth Centuries, pp. 292-3. 

Hospiciis. ' Hospitium ' was the hospitable entertainment regarded as 
due to the temporal lord, or the bishop, with their respective retinues, 
when visiting lands or churches held of them. It was a grave burden. 
The words were often used in the same sense as procuratio. ' Procura- 
tions,' due from every parish, when commuted for a money payment 
formed a considerable source of revenue to the bishop. See Intro- 
duction, p. Ix. 



268 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Sinodalibus. See Introduction, p. Ixi. 

Can et conveth. See Introduction, p. liv. 

A comite de Fyfe, M. filio eius. One can only conjecture that the scribe 
mistook <D' for ' A.' Duncan, Earl of Fife, died in 1204 (Chron. de 
Mailr. s.a.), and was succeded by his son Malcolm. 

CVIII 

Date. William, Bishop of St. Andrews, is doubtless, William Mal- 
voisine, the successsor of Roger, the grantor of No. cvn. He was 
postulated (from Glasgow) 20th September 1202, and died 9th July 1238. 
But the appearance of Thomas, prior of St. Andrews, restricts the date 
of the charter to before 12] 1. 

CIX 

Date. David de Bernham (1239-1253); probably early in his episco- 
pate ; but the absence of the testing clause makes it impossible to say 
more. 

cx 

Dated, the Saturday [20th Dec.] next before Christmas, 1259. 

Page 132. 'G/ the prior of St. Andrews, was Gilbert, who died 
1263. 

Officiario nostro. ' Officiarius ' occurs occasionally in mediaeval writs in 
the sense of the more common word f officialis.' The bishop's official 
heard causes and acted as judge in the bishop's ecclesiastical court. The 
archdeacon also had his official to whom authority was delegated in 
matters pertaining to the archdeacon's jurisdiction. The official of the 
archdeacon of St. Andrews is referred to in No. cxi. (p. 134). 

CXI 

Dated, 3rd February 1256. 

Robert, called the brother of Steward of Strathern. 

Perhaps e senescallus ' is here to be taken simply as the title of office. 
In No. xxiv. Fergusius is ' senescaldusmeus' of Sir Fergus. In No. xxx. 
Malise is ' senescallus meus' of Earl Gilbert. From the Seneschals of 
Strathern the house of Tullibardine is descended (Cosmo Innes, Early 
Scotch History, p. 218). 

In No. xxiv. we learn that Sir Fergus, son of Earl Gilbert, had granted 
leave for the taking of timber from his wood in Fedal in Kathermothel, 
for the erection and upkeep of necessary buildings. It was probably on 
the authority of this grant that the monks made the claim resisted by 
Robert. 

Page 133. Sacrista de Abirbrothoc. In a great monastery the ' sacrista ' 
(sometimes called ' secretarius ') held a responsible and dignified office. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

His place corresponded to that of the treasurer of a cathedral. He had 
custody of the gold and silver plate and jewels,, the reliquaries, and 
the rich vestments. His duties at the Benedictine monastery of St. 
Augustine, at Canterbury, will be found very fully detailed in the 
Customary of St. Augustine's, edited (1902) by Sir E. M. Thompson for 
the Henry Bradshaw Society, i. 101-121. 

Glenlitherne, or Glenllcherne. Glenlicherne is the glen running from 
Braco and Ardoch along the Knaik Water to the north-west towards 
Comrie. [A. G.]. 

CXII 

Dated, January 23rd 1261. 

Page 136. Curelundyn. This place must obviously be not far from the 
Pedals, it is described as c in Stratherne ' ; but it is left to others to 
identify the spot. Kynbuc (Kinbuck), from which Sir Joachim took his 
name, is some three or four miles north of Dunblane on the Allan Water. 

[Curelundyn is now unknown. It is said to be in Strathern, but that 
probably then included Strathallan, or part of it. Lundyn (Gaelic, 
Lointean) means marshes ; and cure may be for corrie, a hollow. Cure- 
lundyn may have been somewhere in the hollow and marshy ground 
between Greenloaning and Blackford. A. G.] 

CXIII 

Dated, 27th March 1260. 

Page 137. Noverit universitas vestra, etc. See No. LXXXVII., of which 
this contains the exemplification. 

Page 138. Gastleton de Borg in Galwythia. Borg, now Borgue, some 
three miles south-west of Kirkcudbright. 

CXIV 

Dated, the Saturday next after the feast of St. Martin in winter 
1261, which Saturday fell in that year on the 12th November. 

Page 142. Willelmum de Brechynch, son of Henry of Brechin, and 
grandson of Earl David. 

Bondington, This has not been identified. 
Kyndelolch. Probably Kinloch, near Collessie. 

cxv 

Dated, Sunday next after the feast of St. Barnabas, 1266, which 
Sunday fell in that year on 13th June. 

Page 145. Inirbervyn, now Bervie, in the shire of Kincardine. ' The 
annewellis of Bervay ' at the close of the fifteenth century brought viij s. 
to the abbey (Laing's Lindores Abbey, p. 411), and the same sum a 



270 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

hundred years later appears among f the Maillis of the landis in the 
Mernis ' as coming from Bervie (ibid. p. 424). 

David de Cambrun. e Cambrun' is a form of ' Cameron.' See Regist. 
Priorut. S. Andree (Index s. v.). 

Lundynr other y. [Probably Linton-Roderick, now West Linton, in 
the shire of Peebles. A. G.] Mr. Gibb's conjecture is doubtless 
correct. A reference to Origines Parochiales, i. 188, 516, 517, will show 
the name in the forms e Lyntounrothryk/ e Lintonrothirrikis/ and, what 
is more pertinent, ' Linton Ilotheri ' (between 1243-1254) in Lib. de 
Calchou, p. 351. 

CXVI 

Date. Richard de Potton, or Pottock, was Bishop of Aberdeen between 
1256 and 1270 (Scotichr. x. 28) or 1272 (Gawan's Epistolare, Regist. 
Aberdon. ii. 247). But from another source we can determine the date 
to be probably July 1261. In the Charters of the Duchy of Lancaster (Box 
A. No. 120) is the quitclaim of the second tithes in exchange for ' villa 
Willelmi' made to Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale, by Thomas, 
abbot of Lindores. This is given in abstract in Bain's Calendar of 
Documents, etc., vol. i. No. 2267. The deed was executed at Lindores 
on the Sunday after the feast of St. Peter ad vincula [1st Aug.] 1261. 
This Sunday in that year fell on 7th August. The quitclaim probably 
followed soon upon Bruce's charter. And the next charter (No. cxvu;) 
is the confirmation by the king on 29th August 1261. 

The grantor was, as we learn from the charter itself, a grandson o 
Earl David. See Introduction, p. xxv. I take it that Bruce grants 
two lands (1) that of Williamstown (which grant united the monks' 
lands of Lethgaven and Wrangham), and (2) that of Bondes near Casky- 
ben. This settles the locality of Lethgaven. 

Isabelle sponse nostre. Isabella, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Earl 
of Gloucester (Dunbar's Scottish Kings, p. 67). 

Page 146. Villa Willelmi, etc. Williamston and Wrangham are 
marked on the Ordnance Map (Sheet 86), a mile or two south and west 
of Kirkton of Culsalmond. Lethgaven must have been east of William- 
ston, near Mellenside. Bondes I take to be what is now called Boynds, 
a little more than a mile north of the ruins of the castle of Caskieben, 
both marked on the Ordnance Map (one inch to the mile), Sheet 76. 

CXVII 

Page 147. Dated, 29th August 1261. 
See what is said above, No. cxvi. 

Page 148. Willelmo Archidiacono Sancti Andree, Cancellario. This is 
William Wiseheart, afterwards successively Bishop-elect of Glasgow 
(1270 or 1271) and Bishop of St. Andrews (elected 2d June 1271). His 
appointment as Chancellor of Scotland is commonly assigned to 1256. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 271 

Johanne de Dundemor. 

Sir John was one of the regents during the minority of Alexander in. 
Several notices of the family will be found in Laing's Lindores Abbey, 
pp. 434, 435. 

CXVIII 

Page 148. Date. The absence of the testing clause is to be regretted. 
The grantor was Henry de Hastinges, grandson of Earl David, and one 
may conjecture that as this is, like No. cxvi., a commutation of second 
tithes, it may be about the same date as that charter. It is confirmed 
by Alexander in. 

Flandris (Flandres) in Garviach. The name seems to be retained in 
the form of Fliuder, Little Flinder, New Flinder, Old Flinder, some 
three or four miles west of Insch. 

CXIX 

Page 150. Date. The testing clause is absent. The grantor is 
Alexander in. It may probably be of about the same time as No. cxvu. 

cxx 

Page 150. Date. No. cxxi. shows that this is a confirmation of 
Alexander n. The testing clause and date are lacking, but may be 
supplied from the Great Seal Register (p. 36, No. xcn.), where it appears 
in an inspeximus and confirmation of David 11. (granted at Dundee 20th 
September 1361). After the word ' Testibus ' the language of the inspexi- 
mus runs, ( Willelmo filio alani senescalli, Justiciario Scocie, Willelmo 
Olifer, Justiciario Laodonie, bernardo fraser, Waltero byseth, iohanne 
de Haya. Apud Castrum puellarum, xij die nouembris. Anno Regni 
domini Regis tercesimo tertio [i.e. 1247].' 

We must not be led away here by the puzzle presented by ' William 
Olifer, Justiciar of Lothian.' 

CXXI 

Page 151. Date. We can only say that this is a charter of Alexander in. 
(1249-1286). The testing clause is lacking. 

CXXII 

Page 152. Date. A charter of Alexander in. (1249-1286). 

CXXIII 

Page 152. Dated, 1260. 

Gocelin de Balliol, brother of John de Balliol. 



272 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Page 153. In molendino suo de Inveralmeslei. Now Inveramsay. The 
mill of Inveramsay is marked on the Ordnance Map (Sheet 76). 

Balhagerdi. Balhaggerdy, a mile or so south-east of Inveramsay mill. 

Inchemabani. Now Insch. 

Donidor. The ruins of the ancient castle of Dunnideer are still visible, 
a little more than a mile west of Insch. 

Unum par cirotecarum albarum. A pair of gloves was not an infrequent 
form among the curious blench-duties of feudal tenures. See Cosmo 
Innes, Scotch Legal Antiquities, pp. 64, 65. 

Page 154. In modum cirograffi. The word chirographum is ordinarily 
used in writs of this period, in a restricted sense, for a deed twice 
written on the same parchment. A space was left between the two 
copies, on which space the word ( Chirographum,' or the letters of the 
Alphabet in large characters, or sometimes some ornamental devices were 
drawn with the pen. Through these letters or devices the parchment 
was cut, sometimes straight across, sometimes in zig-zags, and each party 
to the agreement received a part. The genuineness of either part could 
always be proved by bringing the parts together and seeing that the 
teeth of the indentures fitted into one another, or that the parts of the 
lettering or device fitted together. There were varieties in the way in 
which the parchment was cut. It was sometimes cut with a waving line, 
and hence the term charta undulata, but the teeth-like division was the 
favourite in England and Scotland. More particulars on this subject in 
A. Giry's Manuel de Diplomatique, pp. 510-513. 



CXXIV 

Page 155. Date. Andrew, abbot of Cupar, ruled from 1272 to 1296, when 
(17th December 1296) he was provided to the see of Caithness (Theiner's 
Monumenta, No. ccclix). The grantor, Alexander, Earl of Buchan, died 
in 1289. * William Wiseheart, Bishop of St. Andrews, was not conse- 
crated till 15th October 1273. It may be doubted whether we can be 
more precise than in placing the charter between that date and 1289. 

Alexander Cumyn, Comes de Buchan. This is the third Earl of Buchan, 
grandson of Fergus, whose only child, Margaret, or Margery, married 
William Cumyn, who became earl in right of his wife. Alexander suc- 
ceeded his mother between 1236 and 1240. He was appointed Justiciar 
of Scotland in 1251 ; removed from that office, at the instigation of 
Henry in. of England, in 1255, but was re-appointed in 1257 ; and held 
the office till his death. He married Elizabeth, second daughter of 
Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winton. On the death of De Quiricy in 1264, 
Cumyn, in right of his wife, succeeded to a share of his father-in-law's 



Douglas, Peerage, i. 262. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 273 

possessions in Galloway and elsewhere. He was one of the six guardians 
on the death of Alexander in. * 

Page 155. Kelle (Kelly) in Buchan. Kelly, in the parish of Methlick. 
In the possession of Alexander Cummin, Earl of Buchan, as early at 
least as 1261. In that year he founded an hospital in Newburgh in 
Buchan, the charter being dated ' apud Kelly in Buchan, die Veneris 
proxima post festum S. Matthaei, 1261. ' 2 Another hospital (domus 
elemosinarid) founded by the earl was that of Turreth (Turref). The 
charter is dated f apud Kelli,' 1273 (Collections, Aberdeen and Banff, 
p. 470). In 1287 he bound himself to pay to Arbroath half a mark for 
finding two tapers to be lighted before the altar of St. Mary in the 
monastery. This was in exchange for a ' particula terre inclusa infra 
parcum nostrum de Kelly' (ibid. pp. 322-23). The Gordon family 
appears to have come into possession of the lands of the Park of Kelly 
from David Annand of Ouchterellon in 1483 (Historical Commission 
Report, v. 608). See Dr. Temple's The Thanage of Fermartyn, pp. 2, 3. 

Page 156. Absque aliqua replegiacione. The right of possessors of a 
private jurisdiction to reclaim, to be dealt with in their own- courts, 
persons or goods, subject to their jurisdiction, was styled the right of 
' replegiation.' It would seem that what the Earl of Buchan intended 
in this case was to renounce any right he might possess to reclaim cattle 
or goods taken by distraint from his lands of Kelly by the monks. 

Privilegio crucesignatis vel crucesignandis indulto. Persons who took 
the cross, whose vow to go on crusade was often commuted, were taken 
under the protection of the Church (see Statuta Ecclesie Scoticane, ii. 
20 ; Regist. Aberdon. ii. 15) ; and they were entitled to plead many 
of the exemptions of the clergy. Hence we occasionally meet in old 
charters a disclaimer of pleading such privileges, which imposed many 
difficulties in the event of a recourse to law. 

Page 157. W. episcopus Sancti Andree. From what has been said 
above as to the uncertainty as to the date of this charter, we cannot 
say whether < W was William Wiseheart (15th October 1273-28th May 
1279), or his successor, William Eraser (1279-20th August 1297). 

Andrea Abbate de Cupro. See above, in discussion of the date of the 
charter. 

Rogero pater noster. The bearer of this nickname appears again in 
another charter of this Alexander, Earl of Buchan (dated 1273) as 
' Rogero dicto Paternoster scriptore dicte carte.' He was doubtless an 
ecclesiastic and a scribe. The editor regrets that he has mislaid the 
reference to this charter. ' Roger, called Paternoster,' did homage 
to Edward i. on 31st July 1296 at Kildrummy (Ragman Roll; Bain's 
Calendar, ii. 196). 



1 Douglas, Peerage, i. 262. 

2 Antiquities, Aberdeen and Banff, i. 371-372. 

S 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Kyneth de Neuticbyr. The place-name may perhaps be that found in 
a list of homages in the Ragman Roll, where we find * Richard de 
Neutebere ' (Bain's Calendar, ii. p. 205). 

cxxv 

Dated, 25th January 1281. 

Kynard (Kynhard), now Kinnaird, a property about two miles to the 
south-east of the abbey of Lindores. Mr. A. Laing (Lindores Abbey, 
p. 440) supplies an interesting note from the MS. of Sir James Balfour, 
Lyon King of Arms, who was owner of Kinnaird. ' These lands for- 
merlie belonged to David, Earll of Huntindone, who dysponed the tyndis 
anno 9 regis Willelmi [i.e. 1174, a date which is certainly wrong], under 
the tenour, Omnes decimas ville nostre de Kynnaird Beate Marie et 
monochis de Londres in Sylvis, which he himself founded not a yeir 
befoir, and the lands within 3 yeiris following to Gilbert, Earll of 
Stratherne his cousigne, quhos son Madoc, Earl of Stratherne, with 
consent of his son Malise, dated [doted] the property of the said land to 
the Prioress and Holy Virgins of Elchok in the reign of Alexander n. 
A.D. 1214-1247.' To which more is added as to the later history of the 
successive owners. Sir James was specially interested in this property, 
and probably had special sources of information at his command ; but 
there are some obvious errors in the above statement. 

Page 159. N. Abbate de Durtfermelyn. The Register of Dunfermline 
does not supply an abbot with a name commencing with f N* at this 
date. But there is nothing that contravenes the existence of an abbot 
named Nicholas in the scanty records of the abbey of that time. 

On the subject-matter of the charter, see Introduction, p. Ixxxvi. 

CXXVI 

Date. The reign of Robert i. (27th March 1306-7th June 1329). 
Perhaps before the death of Edward Brus (25th May 1315). 

Page 163. Kynmuk, Balbuthan, Hathirwych. [These lands are all in 
the same neighbourhood, on the east of the Don, in the parish of 
Keithhall and Kinkell. A. G.] The names now appear as Kinmuck, 
Balbithan, and Heatherwick. 

Bernes in le Garviauch. [Mill of Barnes appears on the map near 
Kirkton of Premnay. A. G.] ' Barnes (or Netherhall) lately possessed 
by Gordon of Barnes, but formerly by the Forbeses of Barnes ; and 
before them by the Leiths of Barnes, now by P. Duff.' From the account 
of the parish of Premnay in Collections on the Shires of Aberdeen and 
Banff, p. 550. 'The house of Barnes, alias Neitherhall, is north from 
the church an eighth part of a mile.' Macfarlane's Geographical 
Collections as cited in the Collections, etc., p. 551. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 

CXXVII 

Date. This is an early charter granted by Malise, son of Earl Ferteth 
of Strathern, and son-in-law of Earl David. It was granted before 20th 
March 1198, as the church of Moth ell is mentioned in the bull of 
Innocent in. of that date (p. 109). As Muthill is not mentioned among 
the churches of Lindores in the bull of Celestine in., dated 8th March 
1195, this charter may probably be placed between the dates of the two 
bulls. Henry, abbot of Arbroath, one of the witnesses, fits in well with 
the proposed date. 

CXXVIII 

Dated, 1st March 1291, ' the Thursday next after the feast of St. 
Mathias the Apostle, 1290.' The feast of St. Mathias is 24th February ; 
so that the year intended is probably 1290-91. The Thursday referred 
to fell in that year on March 1st. The grant seems to be made with 
special reference to the weal of the soul of Alexander, Earl of Buchan, 
who had died shortly before (in 1289), and who is styled by the grantor 
' dominus meus.' 

Page 165. Radulphus de Lascellis. Here he is described as ( miles,' and 
as having been married ; so probably (though not necessarily) he is not 
to be identified with ' Radulphus Lasselis, clericus,' who witnesses a 
charter of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan, in 1261 (Regist. Aberdon., 
ii. 277). We find Sir Radulph de Lascellis witnessing a charter of 
Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, between 1273 and 1276 (Regist. Prior. S. Andree, 
p. 380). 

The submission and fealty of ' Rauf de Lasceles, Chevalier' to Edward i. 
(1296), will be found in Sir Francis Palgrave's Documents and Records 
(Scotland), i. 161. 

Huchannane Locherton. [Unknown. A. G.] The land was held by 
Lascellis of the Earl of Buchan. 

CXXIX 

Page 166. Date. Time of King William. David de Lindesey is justiciar 
of the King. 

Page 167. Hugo Brito. The exchange of Connington for lands in the 
Garioch points to Brito (or Britain) being one of the English vassals of 
Earl David. Hugo Briton witnesses a charter of King David i. (before 
the death of Earl Henry) and of Earl Henry (Lib. de Melros, pp. 4, 5) ; 
and three other charters of David (Regist. Glasguen. i. 9, 10, 12). 

Coninton. Connigton, see Introduction, p. 1. 

Flandres. See Notes on No. LXVIII. 

Propter loenig et drocion, etc. 1 had (see p. 167) suggested with 
hesitation that f propter' might be corrected to f prope terras' ; but I 



276 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

am now satisfied that ' propter' is right, signifying ' on account of,' i.e. 
in exchange for. 

cxxx 

Dated Thursday next after the feast of St. John before the Latin Gate, 
1278, which Thursday in the above year fell on June 9. 

Page 168. Reginaldus de Chen pater, more commonly known as 
Reginald le Chen (Cheyne, Chien, Chene). Both the father and Sir 
Reginald, his son, were figures of some importance in their day. In 
1242 Reginald was sheriff of Kincardine. In 1267 he was appointed 
chamberlain (camerarius) of Scotland by King Alexander in. (Scotichr. 
x. 22), but he retired from the court in 1269 (ibid. x. 26). 

Sir Reginald (the son?), in 1286, held the thanage of Fermartyn as 
' firmarius,' the ' firma' or rent being 120 marks (Skerie's Celtic Scotland, 
iii. 252). He submitted to Edward i. at Aberdeen, 17th July 1296. 
See the submission of 'Renaud le Chien, Chivaler,' in Palgrave's 
Documents, i. 175. But he is found among the signatoi'ies of the 
famous anti-English letter to the Pope drawn up in the Parliament at 
Arbroath on 6th April 1320. 

Tholaukery, Cremund, Doesblare. 

Cremund, now Crimond, lies in the parish of Keithall and Kinkel. 
Tholaukery, now Tillikerie, and Dis-blair in the neighbouring parish 
of Fintray. [A. G.] 

CXXXI 

Date. Before the royal confirmation (dated), see No. cxxxn., and 
before the resignation of Adam de Malcarston in June 1262 (No. CXLIII.), 
and before June 5 in that year (No. CXLII.). 

Roger de Quincy, second Earl of Wmton, inherited the lands of 
Locres (Leuchars) in Fife, beside other Scottish estates, which had come 
into possession of his family by the marriage of his grandfather, Robert 
de Quincy, with Orabile, daughter and heir of Ness, Lord of Leuchars. 
Leuchars appears to have been De Quincy 's principal seat in Scotland. 
The woods of Kyndeloch (Kinloch), near Collessie, and the moor of 
Eden, which are mentioned in No. cxxxvu., probably came into the 
hands of the De Quincys in the same manner, if they may not be 
reckoned among the lands of Leuchars. Roger de Quincy became 
constable of Scotland by his marriage with Helen, eldest daughter and 
co-heir of Alan FitzRonald, Lord of Galway, Constable of Scotland, and 
through her, his first wife, obtained also large accessions to his property. 

Dr. Maitland Thomson has furnished the editor with notes illustrating 
the early connection of the family of De Quincy with the lands of Col- 
lessie, derived from charters belonging to Magdalen College, Oxford. 
(1) Grant [1210-1218] by Roger de St. Andrew to the Hospital of Brackele 
[in Northamptonshire] for the soul of himself, etc., and of [his uncle] 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 277 

Seher de Quence, earl of Winton, and Robert, his son, of forty shillings 
of annual rent from his land at Colesyn : witnesses, Sir Roger de Quence, 
Seher de St. Andrew, the donor's brother, etc. (2) Confirmation [1210- 
1218] of the preceding by Seher de S* Andrew : witnesses, Sir Roger de 
Quence, Roger de S fc Andrew, etc. 

Page 170. Adam de Malcarreston (Malcariuston, Malcarston, Malkar- 
stoun). He was official of Gamelin, Bishop of St. Andrews, in 1259. 
We find him here as rector of Collessie, which he, provost of the church 
of St. Mary in the city of St. Andrews, resigns in June 1262 (No. CXLII.). 
He is found provost of the same church, 29th January 1266 (Reg. Priorat. 
S. Andree, p. 311); see also No. cxxxv. He had witnessed charters of 
Bishop David de Bernham in 1241 and 1246 (ibid. pp. 168, 169). He 
was evidently an ecclesiastic of some note, as in the year 1263 he, being 
then rector of Syreys (Ceres), in the diocese of St. Andrews, is appointed 
by Pope Urban iv. a papal chaplain (Cal. Papal Registers, i. 391). 

CXXXII 

Dated, 25th December 1263. 

Page 171. Gamelin, Bishop of St. Andrews, postulated, not (strictly 
speaking) elected, on account of illegitimacy, 29th February 1254 ; 
confirmed by Pope Alexander iv., 1st July 1255 (Theiner's Monumenta, 
No. 176). He is still ' elect ' 20th September 1255 (Bain's Calendar, i. , 
No. 2013). He was consecrated 26th December 1255 (Scotichr. vi. 43). 
Died 29th April 1271 (Scotichr. vi. 43). 

Richard, Bishop of Dunkeld. Richard of Inverkeithing (1250-1272). 

Robert, Bishop of Dunblane. Robert de Prebenda (1259 P-1284 ?). 

CXXXIII 

Dated, 22nd January 1300. 

Page 172. Johannes de Mubray, miles, dominus de Methfen. Once an 
opponent but afterwards an adherent of Edward i. (?). See Tytler, 
History of Scotland, i. 100, 183-5, 232 ; Scotichron. xii. 13 ; Palgrave's 
Documents and Records, etc., vol. i., should also be consulted. 

CXXXIV 

Dated, 29th March 1342. 

Page 173. Thome de Carnoto. Sir Thomas of Charteris (of Kinfauns), 
was Chancellor of Scotland in 1340. See Exchequer Rolls, i. 464, and 
Preface, Ixxv. 

Page 174. Quondam Thomam Ranulphi Comitem Moravie. The great 
Thomas Randolph, nephew of King Robert i. (son of his sister 
Isabella de Brus and Thomas 'son of Ranulf), was created Earl 
of Moray in perhaps 1312, certainly before 27th April 1315. He 
was both a statesman and a soldier, one of the leading supporters of 



278 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Bruce ; was guardian of David n. ; and died (as some suspect, of poison) 
at Musselburgh on 20th July 1332 (Scotichron. xiii. 22, and Forduri's 
Annalia, No. 146, Skene's edition). On 13th November 1329 Pope 
John xxn., in a letter addressed to Randolph, replies favourably to a 
petition of his that his heart might be extracted after his decease 
and buried in one place, and his body in another (Theiner's Monumenta, 
No. 489). One may conjecture that Bruce's bequeathing his heart to 
be buried at Jerusalem, ' apud sepulchrum Domini,' suggested the wish 
to Randolph. A discussion as to the cause of Randolph's death will 
be found in Dalrymple's Annals, iii. 52-54. ' Black Agnes,' wife of 
Patrick, ninth Earl of Dunbar, was his daughter. 

Dilectum nepotem nostrum. This is an example of the loose way in 
which nepos was sometimes used. I have rendered the word by 
' cousin ' as in accordance with the facts. David elsewhere styles 
Randolph ( consanguineum nostrum' (Reg. Morav. pp. 157, 158). 

Quondam Jacobi . . . tune Eplscopi S. Andree. James Bene (Ben, 
Bane) was ' provided ' to St. Andrews by the Pope, 1st August 1328 
(Theiner's Monumenta, No. 472). He fled from Scotland shortly after 
the battle of Dupplin (12th August 1332), and died at Bruges in the 
following month (22nd September). As King Robert i. died 7th June 
1329, we can within tolerably narrow limits fix the date of the Parlia- 
ment referred to as held at Scone. A passage quite pertinent to the 
subject is to be found in the Statuta Secunda Roberti Primi (cap. i. 4), 
which are undated. As printed by Skene in his addition to Regiam 
Majestatem, it runs thus : ' Et si Abbates, Priores, Custodes hospitalium, 
aliarum domorum fundatarum a Domino Rege, vel ejus antecessoribus, 
alienaverint tenementa domibus illis ab ipso, vel progenitoribus suis 
collata, tenementa ilia in manibus Domini Regis capiantur, et ad 
voluntatem suam teneantur, et emptor amittat suum recuperare, tarn de 
tenemento quam de pecunia quam pacavit.' See also the following 
sections. This is most probably the act referred to in our Chartulary. 
And the persons named show that the Parliament was held late in 1328, 
or early in 1329. Of this Parliament at Scone this charter seems to be 
our sole evidence, and thus adds an important fact to the history of 
Scotland. Hitherto the last Parliament of Robert i. has been supposed 
to be that of Cambuskeniieth in 1326. 

Apud monasterium de Kynlosae. David n. , after seven years in France, 
had landed in Scotland, 2nd June 1341. We find him still at Kinlos 
six days later than the date of our charter, namely on 4th April 1342 
(Regist. Morav. p. 127). This falls in well with the date of our charter. 

cxxxv 

Date. The date commonly assigned to Wiseheart's appointment to the 
chancellorship is 1256 ; and the grantor, R. de Quency, died 28th April 
1264. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 279 

Page 175. Cheminagium (chymnachium) : from the old French 
cheminage, was commonly used for the payment or tolls demanded 
by the owners of forest for the passage of horses and wagons. l Liberum 
cheminagium ' is permission of passing without toll through the wood. 

Page 176. Magistro W. Wyscard, archidiacono Sancti Andree, etc. He 
was elected to the see of Glasgow in 1270, and, while ( elect of Glasgow,' 
elected (2nd June 1271) to St. Andrews (Ghron. de Mailr. s.a.). 

CXXXVI 

Dated, at Lindores, 24th August 1302. 

Sir William of Brechin, son of Sir Henry (son of Earl David), married 
the fourth daughter of Alexander, Earl of Buchan. See No. cxxiv. 
(Douglas, Peerage.) From No. LXI. we learn that Sir William had lands 
at Lindores, and from No. LXII. that he had a castle there. 

CXXXVII 

Dated, at Dysart, 8th March 1247-8. 

There is a confirmation of this grant by King Robert in the Had- 
dington collection of charters (in the Advocates' Library). It has been 
printed by Mr. Turnbull (Liber S. Marie de Lundoris, p. 41). It is 
undated and the testing clause is lacking. Mr. Turnbull is in error in 
making Robert the First the confirmer ; but he had not material for 
correcting the rather natural conjecture. 

CXXXIX 

See No. xv., of which this is a later transcript, with omission of the 
names of the witnesses. 

CXL 

Date. The witnesses appear to belong to the time of William of 
Brechin. Here we have Hugo de Beaumys (' miles') and Robertus Mabilie. 
In William of Brechin's charter, No. LXI., we find ' Hugo de Beaumys' 
and ' Robertus filius Mabilie.' 

Page 185. In magnum lacum. [The great loch is the loch of Rossie, 
now drained, in the parish of Collessie. A. G.]. I have allowed the 
more obvious view, that the great loch is the loch of Lindores, to stand 
in the Introduction, p. xxxix. It is the view held by one so well versed 
in the local topography of the district as Mr. Alexander Laing. 

CXLI 

This is a repetition of No. cxxxi. 



280 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

CXLII 

Dated, Dervasyn (Dairsie), 5th June 1262. 

Dairsie, a couple of miles east of Cupar in Fife, was one of the minor 
manors of the Bishop of St. Andrews. We find Gamelin dating a charter 
there in 12G6-7 (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, p. 311). 

CXLIII 

Dated, at Lindores on the Saturday next after the feast of St. Barnabas 
(llth June), that is on Saturday, 17th June 1262. This resignation into 
the hands of Thomas, abhot of Lindores, is dated six days after the con- 
firmation by the chapter of St. Andrews (No. CXLIV.) and twelve days 
after the bishop's grant (No. CXLII.). 

CXLIV 

Dated, at St. Andrews, llth June 1262. 

Gilbertus ... Prior cathedralis ecclesie. Gilbert, formerly treasurer, 
became prior on 19th August 1258, and died 17th March 1263-4. He 
is described as f vir religiosus, et gratiosus in temporalibus, licet non 
evidenter literatus' (Scotichron. vi. 51). 

CXLV 

Dated, at Monimel, Friday next after the Epiphany, that is Friday 
7th January, 1277. 

This is an inspeximus and confirmation. Possibly some defect was 
suspected in the formalities of the resignation that had been made : see 
the clause ' et supplemus defectum,' etc., and also No. CXLVI. 

Willelmus. W. Wiseheart, postulated 2nd June 1271 ; but not con- 
secrated till Sunday, 15th October 1273. He died 28th May 1279. 

Monlmel. Monimail, a few miles north-west of Cupar and not far from 
Lindores, was a lesser manor of the Bishop of St. Andrews. 

CXLVI 

There is nothing to determine the date. The charter is most probably 
by Wiseheart (15th October 1273-28th May 1279), who here confirms 
Gamelin's charter (No. CXLII.), as in No. CXLV. he confirmed No. CXLIII., 
and the date is probably the same as that of No. CXLV. A confirmation of 
Roger de Quincy's grant of Collessie by Pope Nicholas iv., 13th December 
1288, is printed by Stevenson (Documents, etc., i. 68) and by Theiner 
(Monumenta, No. 308). 

CXLVII 

Dated, at Edinburgh, 15th December 1357. 

This is shortly after David's release from his eleven years' captivity 
in England. 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 281 

Page 197. Thomam, Comitem de Marre. Thomas succeeded his father, 
Donald (the Regent who fell in the slaughter at Dupplin), in 1332. He 
obtained the lordship of Garioch, in 1355, on the death of his grand- 
mother, Christian Bruce, on whom it had been conferred by King Robert i. 
He died without issue in 1377. His sister, Margaret, was married to 
William, first Earl of Douglas, who, in right of marriage, became Earl 
of Mar. 

CXLVIII 

Dated, at the castle of Kyldromy, 19th August 1359. 

Page 199. Thomas, Comes de Marre. See notes on No. CXLVII. 

Apud castrum nostrum de Kyldromy. For an account (about 1725) of 
the ruins of Kildrummy castle, see Macfarlane's Geographical Collections 
as cited in Collections on the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, pp. 590-591. 
About two years after the granting of this charter David n., for some 
reasons not explained, besieged and took the castle and placed a garrison 
in it. Mar obtained leave to quit the kingdom, but was soon received 
again into the royal favour. See Dalrymple's Annals, ii. 302-3. 

CXLIX 

The date of this legal opinion is after the accession of William, Earl 
of Douglas, to the Earldom of Mar by marriage with Margaret, sister of 
Earl Thomas, i.e. after 1377. 

For the references to the Civil and Canon Law and the commentators 
see Appendix V. 

CL 

The date of this legal opinion is uncertain. 
A. and B. stand for Aberdeen and Brechin. 
For the citations from the Canon Law, see Appendix V. 

CLI 

Dated, at Newburgh, 7th February 1478-9. Sasine is given on 26th 
March. See No. CLIII. 

Page 216. Vicarius ecclesie parochialis de Inchestur. Inchture in Gowrie. 
The name in No. CLIII. is Inchthur. 

Dompni Jacobi de Rossy. See Appendix IV. pp. 309-310. 

His arms are a chevron between two escalops and a trefoil slipped. 
See Appendix VII. 

CLII 

Date. 24th May 1457. 

This charter was printed in Liber Sancte Marie de Lundoris (pp. 3-5) 
from the transcript in the Advocates' Library. The variants are 



282 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

unimportant : in line 9 ' predict! ' (burgenses) is read ' dicti ' ; in line 6 
(p. 221) ' fruniendi ' is misspelled 'frumiendi'; in line 9 from foot 
'possedimus' is read ' possidemus' ; 'nostras' in the last line (p. 221) 
is omitted. There is an exemplification of it in a charter of Abbot John, 
dated 13th July 1457, preserved in the charter-chest of Newburgh, of 
which Mr. Laing gives an English translation (Lindores Abbey, pp. 479- 
483). 

Page 220. Johannes . . . abbas. See Appendix IV. p. 310. 

Page 221. Secundum formam et tenorem carte . . . regis Alexandri. 
King Alexander's charter is not found in our volume ; but it was copied 
from the MS. transcript in the Advocates' Library and printed by 
Turnbull (p. 8). It grants to the abbot and convent and their successors 
that they should have for ever ' villam eorum que dicitur Novus burgus 
juxta monasterium de Lundoris in liberum burgum, et forum in eodem 
burgo quolibet die Martis cum libertatibus burgi et fori. Salvis in 
omnibus burgorum nostrorum libertatibus.' It is dated ' apud Strivelyn 
quarto die Marcii, anno regni nostri septimo decimo.' That the king 
was Alexander in. (not Alexander n.) we gather from the presence of 
' William, Earl of Mar, chamberlain,' among the witnesses. The year, 
therefore, was 1266. Mr. Alexander Laing has made a curious slip in 
rendering 'quolibet die Martis' 'any day in March' (Lindores Abbey, 
p. 142). The concession is for a market on Tuesdays throughout the 
year. And so it is expressed in our charter. But the slip is corrected 
at p. 481. 1 

CLIII 

Dated, Newburgh, 27th March 1479. See No. CLI. 

Page 224. Infra capellam ejusdem. We find that in 1473 there was a 
chapel at Newburgh dedicated to St. Katherine (Lindores Abbey, p. 168). 
Compare No. CLII., where we find that the yearly fair was held on St. 
Katherine's day, 25th November. The bailies and council of the burgh 
seem to have commonly transacted burgh business in the chapel (ibid. 
pp. 175, 510). Mr. Alexander Laing has collected some curious infor- 
mation about this chapel and its chaplains in his volume Lindores Abbey. 

CLIV 

Fragment of a Public Instrument. 

The year of this fragment is not given, yet we can infer it, with 
reasonable confidence, from the following data. An ecclesiastic, named 
l)e Butyll, appears as Archdeacon of Candida Casa. He also holds some 
office at the papal court (sacri palacij . . .). Now we find a certain 



1 The weekly market in 1600 was on 'die Sabbati wulgo Setterday.' See 
Charter of Feu-farm by James VI. to Patrick, second Lord Lindores (Lindores 
Abbey, p. 500). 



NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS 283 

Thomas de Butyl (or Butill) in 1388 Provost of the Chapel of St. Mary, 
May bole (Calendar of Papal Registers: Petitions, i. 570). In 1390 he is 
still holding the same office (ibid. p. 574), but we find him petition- 
ing in that year for the archdeaconry of Whitherne (ibid. p. 575). In 
1412 we find Thomas de Butyl, Doctor of Canon Law and Papal Auditor, 
archdeacon of Whiteherne and chaplain of St. Mary's, May bole (ibid. 
p. 595). In 1413 he is described as archdeacon of Whiteherne and papal 
chaplain and auditor, and for him Benedict xm. (Anti-Pope) reserves 
' the church of Abernith ' in the diocese of Dunkeld (ibid. p. 599). In 
1415 Benedict xui. provides him to the church of Kinkel (valued, with 
its chapels, at 100), in the diocese of Aberdeen, and also to the canonry 
and prebend of ' Inverkethny/ in Moray (ibid. p. G02). Later in the 
same year he is promoted to the see of Candida Casa. It would thus 
appear that this instrument should probably be dated some time between 
1412 and 1415. But we find remaining in the MS. just enough of the 
date to establish that the Instrument was drawn up in the f Seventh 
Indiction.' This practically fixes the year as 1414. 1 

Among the other names occurring in the fragment are Richard Cady, 
Robert de Dryden, and John Scheves. Ecclesiastics bearing these names 
are found among the many Scottish petitioners to the Pope about this 
time. John Scheves, of the Instrument (if we may venture to identify 
him with the petitioner), rector of the University of St. Andrews and 
official, petitioned Benedict xui., in 1418, for the archdeaconry of 
Teviotdale, and his petition was granted (Calendar of Papal Registers: 
Petitions, L 609). In 1394 there was one Robert de Dryden, a priest 
in the diocese of Glasgow (ibid. p. 617). Richard Cady, priest of 
the diocese of Dunkeld, was a petitioner in 1409 (ibid. p. 594) ; again in 
1411 (p. 597) ; and again (now a Bachelor in Common Law) in 1417 
(p. 606). 



1 The year 1399 was also the 'Seventh Indiction'; but Butyll does not 
appear as holding an office in the 'sacred palace' till 1412. 



284 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



APPENDIX I 

THE following charter, which in the opinion of the editor is the 
earliest known writ connected with Lindores, is among the 
Campbell Charters (xxx. J.6) preserved in the British Museum. 
A fragment of the seal remains attached. The transcript was 
made by Dr. J. Maitland Thomson, Curator of the Historical 
Department in H.M. General Register House, Edinburgh, and 
supplied for this volume. 

' Nouerint omnes presentes et futuri quod ego O. abbas et 
conuentus ecclesie Kelchoensis quietum clamauimus ab omni- 
moda subiectione et obedientia dompnum Guidonem electum in 
abbatem ecclesie Sancti Andree de Lundores nee propter hoc 
quod monachos nostros illi ad edificandum locum ilium accom- 
modauimus aliquam potestatem aliquo tempore aliquis abbas de 
Kelchou habeat super domum vel super abbatem predicte ecclesie 
Sancti Andree de Lundores nee abbas de Kelchou maiorem 
potestatem habeat in abbatem vel in predictam ecclesiam Sancti 
Andree de Lundores quam abbas Sancti Andree de Lundores 
in abbatem vel in ecclesiam de Kelchou Igitur sola caritas 
familiaritas et orationes uigeant et ineternum permaneant inter 
predictas domos et earum personas nulla uero dominatio vel 
potestas salvo ordine et habitu nostro. Hiis testibus Willelmo 
rege Scotie comite Dauid fratre regis Scotie qui predictam 
ecclesiam fundauit Rogero electo Sancti Andree Jocelino 
episcopo Glasguensi Matheo episcopo Aberdonensi J. episcopo 
de Dunkeld' Hugone archidiacono de Sancto Andrea et cancel - 
lario domini regis Dunecano comite de Fife comite Patrick) G. 
comite de Stradhern Serlone de Quinti Roberto de Lundres 
filio regis Malcholmo filio comitis Dunekani Alano dapifero 
Willelmo de Lindesya Waltero de Berchelay Willelmo Cumino 
Willelmo' Giffard Walkelino filio Stephani Malcholmo filio 
Bertoldi Nicholao de Aclles Willelmo Wascelin Barcholomeo 
monacho Henrico filio comitis et Roberto Basset cum multis 
aliis.' 



APPENDIX I 285 

(Abstract) 

Let all present and to come know that I, O[sbert], abbot, and the 
convent of the church of Kelso have quitclaimed from subjection and 
obedience of every kind Sir Guido, elected to be abbot of the church of 
St. Andrews of Lindores. Nor shall any abbot of Kelso have at any 
time any power over the house or over the abbot of the aforesaid church 
of St. Andrew of Lindores by reason of our having lent our monks to 
him for the building of that place. Nor shall the abbot of Kelso have 
greater power over the abbot or over the aforesaid church of St. Andrew 
of Lindores than the abbot of St. Andrew of Lindores has over the abbot 
or over the church of Kelso. Therefore may love only, friendship, and 
prayers flourish and remain for ever between the aforesaid houses and 
those having authority in them [earum personas ; but, possibly, personue 
is here used in a non-technical sense, meaning simply ' their members'] 
but no lordship or power, saving our order and habit. These being 
witnesses . . . 

The charter printed above is probably the earliest writ extant 
relating to the monastery of Lindores. It exempts from the 
jurisdiction of the abbot of Kelso Guido ' electum in abbatem 
ecclesie Sancti Andree de Lundores.' The form of expression 
suggests that it was written when Guido was only ' elect/ that is, 
when he had not yet received the benediction to his office. 1 This, 
as well as the general character of the contents, points to a date 
earlier than the first dated document, the bull of Celestine in., of 
8th March 1195, which is addressed to the 'abbot and convent.' 
As is well known, Roger de Beaumont, one of the witnesses, was 
for many years 'elect of St. Andrews' before his consecration. 
He was elected 13th April 1189 (Chron. de Mailr. s.a.), and not 
consecrated till 15th February 1198 (ibid. s.a.). In the present 
charter he appears as ' elect of St. Andrews/ so that a pretty wide 
margin is allowed for the dating of the document ; nor is it limited 
by the histories of the other witnesses. 

But we find Guido as 'abbot' at least as early as 1194 (see 
Appendix iv.), so I would place this charter before that date, and 
perhaps it may be as early as 11.91. 



1 But one has to acknowledge that in the case of the quitclaim (in like 
language) by John, abbot of Kelso, of the subjection of Reginald, elected abbot 
of Arbroath, Matthew, bishop of Aberdeen, one of the witnesses, has added to 
his name ' qui prenominatum Reginaldum vacante ecclesia Sancti Andree . . . 
in abbatem benedixit.' Regist. de Aberbroth., vol. i. p. 8. 



286 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



APPENDIX II 

DESCRIPTION OF THE MS. BY J. MAITLAND THOMSON, 
LL.D., CURATOR OF THE HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT OF H.M. 
GENERAL REGISTER HOUSE. 

The Register consists of (1) five gatherings containing respec- 
tively, 6, 3, 6, 8, and 3 leaves, in all 26 leaves ; (2) five gatherings 
of 12 leaves each, in all 60 leaves. The whole is paged continuously 
according to its present arrangement, from fol. 3 to 87 one leaf 
between fols. 81 and 82 having been overlooked in paging. 

The second of the two sections clearly ought to precede the 
other, and does so in the print. The greater part of it (fols. 29 
to 74 versa, except 64 and part of 63 verso comprising rather 
more than half of the whole Register) is in one handwriting, as- 
signed by Dr. Dickson to about A.D. 1260. Each charter has an 
initial letter in red or blue, the illuminator having begun with 
making them red on one side of the leaf and blue on the other, 
and afterwards preferred to make them red and blue alternately : 
but neither rule is strictly adhered to, and several initials have 
not been filled in at all. There are contemporary rubrics to each 
charter up to fol. 58, and again fols. 6.5 to 73. Each page contains 
25 lines. 

Fol. 74 verso, and up to fol. 78, are written by a different scribe, 
contemporary with the first, or not much later. Here there are no 
coloured initials, and the titles are in black ; but every important 
word has its initial touched with red. The usual number of lines 
to the page is 26. 

The contents of fol. 63 verso, 64, 78 to the end, and 4 to 17 
inclusive, seem all to have been engrossed in the first half of the 
fourteenth century ; but there is a great variety of handwriting, 
and no uniformity of style. The number of lines to the page 
varies from l6 to over 40. Rubrics and coloured initials occur 
fols. 8 to 10 only. Five leaves have been cut away between fols. 
8 and 9, but they probably did not form part of the Register 
fol. 8 ends with a rubric descriptive of the charter which begins 
on fol. 9. The three gatherings which now begin the Register 
seem to have originally followed the gathering which now closes 
the Register. They are analogous to the contents of fols. 78 to 



APPENDIX III 287 

87, and in some cases the handwriting may be identified compare 
especially fol. 81 ff. with fol. 12 ff. The latest, but not the last 
engrossed, charter in this section belongs to the year 1342. On 
fol. 17 verso a charter ends abruptly, and something may have 
been lost. 

The two gatherings which form fols. 18 to 28 are later. Fols. 
18 to 24 are in an early fifteenth century hand ; fols. 25 to 27 are 
in different hands of the end of the same century. Fol. 27 is 
written by the same scribe who supplied titles missed by the 
rubricatorin the earlier portions of the Register, and added sundry 
notes. Three leaves are cut away between fols. 25 and 26, but 
there is no lacuna. 

I think that what has been described is all that the Register 
contained when arranged, bound and paged as at present. It 
will be seen that the pagination begins with fol. 4 three blank 
leaves may have been left at the beginning for supplementary 
matter, one of which was filled up by a sixteenth century scribe 
with the instrument which,, in the edition, concludes the Register. 
The other two may have been removed. There is a fly-leaf, cut 
out of an instrument not relating to Lindores which, from what 
remains of it, must belong to either 1399 or 1414; the proof 
being (1) that it is of the seventh indiction ; (2) that Thomas de 
Butill is named as archdeacon of Galloway, a benefice to which he 
was provided in 1391, and which he held till 1415. 



APPENDIX III 

A CLUE-CATALOGUE OF SOME CHARTERS AND OTHER 
WRITS, RELATING TO LINDORES, NOT FOUND IN 
THE CHARTULARY. 

The documents indicated below concern the abbey, its rights, 
privileges, and property, down to the time of the Reformation. 
No note is taken of the later history of the abbey lands. The 
contents of the documents referred to are given only in a summary 
way : for details the student must examine the sources. 

Many of the documents are to be found in the little MS. 
volume in the Advocates' Library, lettered on the back Liber S. 
Marie de Lundoris. These have been printed by Mr. Turnbull for 
the Abbotsford Club, who has added an appendix of other writs 



288 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

relating to the Abbey. The volume of the Abbotsford Club is 
indicated by LL. Theiner's Fetera Monumenta is indicated by T. ; 
The Calendar of Papal Registers by C.P.R. ; The Registrum Magni 
Sigilli by R.M.S. ; of the latter the writs up to A.D. 1424 are cited 
from the folio edition of 1814. 

Of the documents printed by Mr. Turnbull, very full abstracts 
(in English) may be found in Mr. A. Laing's Lindores Abbey, 
pp. 467-483, in which volume also will be found abstracts of charters 
in the Charter-chest of Newburgh. The latter chiefly concern 
the burgh, but a few relate to the abbey or the abbots. The 
former are not noticed here : the latter are indicated here only 
in the briefest way ; and those who desire details are referred to 
Mr. Laing's volume. 

(i.) Before 1194 (?). Quitclaim of obedience and subjection of 
Guido, abbot-elect of the church of St. Andrew of Lindores, by 
O[sbert], abbot of Kelso. British Museum, Campbell Charters, 
xxx. 16. See Appendix i. 

(2.) Before 8th March 1195, Selkirk. King William grants full 
tofts in his burghs of Berwick, Stirling, Crail, Perth, Forfar, 
Montrose, and Aberdeen ; to be held ' in liberam elemosinam.' x 
LL., p. 9- 

(3.) A few years (c. 1202) later than our No. II. The foundation 
charter given again with a few variants, and other witnesses. 
Original in the Advocates' Library (29 Denmyln A. 3. 22): 
printed in LL., pp. 37-38. See p. 233. 

(4.) Between 1st January 1219 and 1225. Gregory, Bishop of 
Brechin, confirms to Lindores the grant made by his predecessors 
of the church of Dundee with its chapels, lands, and pertinents, 
ad proprios usus. The vicar is to be presented by the monastery, 
and to receive ten pounds sterling per an., out of which he is to 
pay the bishop's dues (episcopalia). The monastery is to have the 
right of appointing to the schools of Dundee. LL., p. 17. 

(5.) 1248, April 20, Lyons. Pope Innocent [iv.] states that a 
petition had been presented to him by the abbots of Kelso and 
Lindores and the prior of the cathedral church of St. Andrews, 
with respect to their churches in the diocese of Aberdeen ; and 
that the Bishop of Aberdeen on his part had complained that 
the abbots and the prior had demanded unduly large pensions 

1 These grants are confirmed by Celestine in. (No. xcin.). 



APPENDIX III 289 

from the vicars, and had taken lands and other possessions 
belonging to the vicarages for their own use. The Pope commits 
to the Chancellor of Moray, the Treasurer, and Master John de 
Everley, Canon of Dunkeld, to inquire into the revenues of the 
said churches, to assign fitting portions to the vicars, and to 
restrain any from molesting the said abbots and prior, after the 
judgment of the commissioners had been pronounced. Registr. 
Aberdon., i. 20-21. Compare No. xcn. in our Chartulary. 

(6.) 1251, May 20, Kinghorn. King Alexander [in. 1 ] grants to 
the abbot and convent of Lindores their whole wood in the fee of 
Fintray to be held 'in liberam forestam.' No one to cut timber 
or hunt in said wood without the leave of the abbot and convent. 
LL., p. 10. 

(7.) Early (?) in 1252. Admission by Albin, Bishop of Brechin, 
of William Mydford to the vicarage of Dundee on the presenta- 
tion of the abbot and convent of Lindores, under the reservation 
to the bishop of the ' taxatio ' of the vicarage. Monday before 
Ash Wednesday, 1252, was assigned for the ' taxatio.' The parties 
appeared on the day appointed, and the bishop, after careful 
inquiry, on the advice of ' probi viri,' pronounced sentence that 
the vicar should receive the whole altarage, and pay at Easter 
every year ten marks sterling to the abbot and convent. L.L., 
p. 10. 

(8.) 1256, March 18, Lateran. Pope Alexander [iv.] to the abbot 
and convent of Lindores. He confirms the ' taxatio ' of the Bishop 
of Brechin ; for, although the vicar had appealed against it, he 
had failed to prosecute the appeal within the lawful time. L.L., 
p. 13. 

(9.) 1256, April 27, Lateran. Pope Alexander [iv.] to the abbot 
and convent of Lindores. A competent portion having been 
assigned for their maintenance to the vicars of their appropriate 
churches in the diocese of Aberdeen, the vicars were to be respon- 
sible for bishops' dues and other customary burdens ; and neither 
the bishop nor archdeacon was to exact anything from the portion 
belonging to the convent. T., p. 71. 

(10.) 1256 September 21. Albin, Bishop of Brechin, recounts 
the arrangement stated in No. 7. But the vicar, though frequently 

1 Gilbert de Haya, witness, leads us to believe that the charter is not of 
Alexander II. 



290 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

admonished, was not careful to pay the ten marks. The monks of 
Lindores had obtained Apostolic Letters to the prior of May and 
the provost of St. Mary's church, St. Andrews; and the vicar had 
obtained similar letters to the official of Aberdeen and his colleague. 
The vicar alleged that he had to pay so much to the abbot and 
convent that he could not be suitably maintained on the residue. 
While litigation was pending before the official and his colleague, 
Mydford the vicar retired from the suit. The prior and provost 
proceeded in the case before them, approved of the bishop's 
'taxatio/ and gave definitive sentence to that effect. Mydford 
appealed from this sentence, and obtained Apostolic Letters to the 
abbot of Kynloss and his colleagues. But while the appeal was 
pending before these judges, Mydford appeared before the Bishops 
of Dunblane and Brechin and other prelates, in the church of 
the Friars Preachers, at Perth, on Saturday next after 14th Sep- 
tember 1256 [i.e. on Sept. 16], agreed to the payment of the ten 
marks, and submitted himself to the judgment of the Bishops of 
Dunblane and Brechin as regards damages and costs. The bishops 
adjudged him to pay the arrears, and also fifty marks for damages 
and costs (although they really came to more), and remitted the 
vicar to the special grace of the abbot and convent. Sealed with 
the seals of the two bishops. LL., pp. 14-16. 

(n.) 1257, February 10, Lateran. Pope Alexander [iv.] to the 
abbot and convent. Prohibits the bishop or archdeacon of Brechin 
exacting anything from that portion of the revenues from the 
church of Dundee which belonged to the abbot and convent, or 
sequestrating the same. The vicar had been assigned a portion 
from which he was to bear the episcopalia and other burdens. 
LL., p. 16. 

(12.) 1257, September 13, Rome, St. Peters. Pope Alexander [iv.] 
confirms the sentence of f taxatio' of the parishes in the diocese of 
Aberdeen appropriated to Lindores, which sentence had been 
pronounced at Banquhory Terny on the Thursday next after the 
feast of St. Peter ad vincula [1 Aug.], 1250, by the commissioners 
appointed [see No. 5]. The 'taxatio' detailed in full. Reg. Aberdon., 
i. 23-26. 

(13.) 1259, August 1. Composition between Richard, Bishop of 
Aberdeen, and Thomas, abbot of Lindores, as to the boundaries 
of Threpland, lying between the bishop's land of Bondyngton and 
the monks' land of Newton. Ibid. i. 26. 



APPENDIX III 291 

(14.) 126l, August 7. Quitclaim by Thomas, abbot of Lindores, 
and the convent to Sir Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale, of the 
second tithes of the lands of the latter beyond the Mounth. 
Record Office. See Bain's Calendar, ii. No. 2267. 1 

(15.) 1265, March 14, Lindores. King Alexander [HI.] grants 
that the whole wood of the monks, with the lands at Lindores, 
should be held ' in liberam forestam.' No one to cut or hunt in 
the said wood without the leave of the abbot and convent. 
LL., p. 11. 

(16.) 1266, March 4, Stirling. King Alexander [in.] grants and 
confirms to the abbot and convent that they should have their 
vill which is called New Burgh ' in liberum burgum/ with a 
market every Tuesday, and the liberties of burgh and market, 
( saving the liberties of our burghs.' LL., p. 8. 

(17.) 1282, March 15, Orvielo. Pope Martin [iv.] notifies the 
amount of cess payable by certain monasteries in England and 
Scotland. The abbey of Lindores was to pay 2 bezants. C.P.R., 
i. 475-76. 

(18.) 1288, December 13, at St. Maria Maggiore. Nicholas [iv.] to 
the abbot and convent, confirms the grant of the church of 
Collessie made by Roger de Quency. [See Nos. CXLI.-CXLV.]. 
T., p. 140. 

(19.) 1289, March 15, at St. Maria Maggiore. Nicholas [iv.] to 
the abbot and convent. In answer to a petition stating that 
Scotland is a cold region, and that some of the monks had suffered 
from being bare-headed when on certain solemn festivals they 
were vested in albs and silk copes, grants permission that they 
-should use caps (pileii) on these festivals and in processions, pro- 
vided that due reverence was done at the reading of the Gospel 
[in the Mass] and at the Elevation, and in all other things. 2 
T., p. 141; LL., pp. 24-25. 

(20.) 1290, September 13, Orvieto. Nicholas [iv.] to the abbot and 
convent. In answer to a letter stating that the Privilege of 
Pope Celestine [see No. xcni.] had begun to be destroyed by age 
[quia vero illud incipit nimia vetustate consumi] the Pope recites the 
Privilege in full [differences only in the strange spelling of the 

1 The seal attached is described in Appendix vii. 

2 Where divina ministeria is read by T. , divina misteria is read by LL. 



292 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

place-names], and declares that the present letter should have all 
the force of the original and might be exhibited in courts of law 
or elsewhere. T., p. 141. 

(21.) 1309-10, February 19, 'the Thursday next before the feast of 
St. Peter's Chair' (Feb. 22), Lindores. Memorandum of a con- 
troversy between the abbot and convent of the one part, and the 
men of the New Burgh of Lindores of the other part, as it was 
debated in the chapter-house before Sir Robert of Keith, Marshal 
of Scotland, and Justiciar from the water of Forth to the mountains 
of Scotland. Continued on the following day, Friday, in the 
presence of the Bishop of St. Andrews and others. The men of 
the burgh had withheld their fermes for five years. Decision in 
favour of the monastery. LL., pp. 11-13. [This writ is trans- 
lated at length in Lindores Abbey, pp. 474-75, and presents an 
interesting illustration of the legal procedure of the time.] 

(22.) 1306-1329. An undated charter of King Robert (presum- 
ably Robert i.) confirming No. cxxxvn. of our Chartulary. The 
witnesses are not recorded. Printed by Turnbull (from a charter 
in Haddington's Collection in the Advocates' Library) in LL., 
p. 41. 

(23.) 1345, June 24, Villeneuve, near Avignon. Pope Clement vi. 
grants to Simon Young (Juvenis) of the diocese of Aberdeen the 
reservation of a benefice, value twenty marks with cure of souls, or 
fifteen marks without cure, in the gift of the abbot and convent of 
Lindores. C. P. R., iii. 185 [compare C.P.R. 'Petitions,' i. 95]. 

(24.) 1345, December 7, Avignon. Pope Clement vi. to the 
Abbot of Lindores and the Prior of Abernethy to make provision 
to Walter de Coventre, M.A., Licentiate of Civil Law, canon of 
Ross and Abernethy, of the archdeaconry of Dunblane. C.P.R. , 
iii. 198. 

(25.) 1350, March 17 [or March 16, in exemplification, No. 27], 
Lindores. Duncan, Earl of Fife, grants in proprios usus to Lindores 
the parish church of Ochtirmokadi (Auchtermuchty), in fulfilment 
of a vow made when he was taken prisoner by the English at the 
battle of Durham [Neville's Cross, 17 Oct. 1346]. From the 
exemplification in a confirmation by King David. Haddingtons 
Charters, LL., pp. 43-45. 

(26.) 1352, April 12, St. Andrews. William [Landels] Bishop of 
St. Andrews, with the assent of his chapter, confirms Earl 
Duncan's gift (No. 25). From exemplification in No. 27. 



APPENDIX III 

(27.) 1354, Decembers, Avignon. Pope Innocent vi. confirms the 
grant of the parish church of Ochtirmokadi (Auchtermuchty) in 
the diocese of St. Andrews, by Duncan, Earl of Fife. This writ 
contains exemplifications of Nos. 25, 26. C.P.R., iii. 539-540. 

(28.) 1355, November 19, Lindores. Sir David de Lyndesay of 
Crauford grants to Lindores six stones of wax to be paid annually 
for finding a light to be burned daily in the choir of the abbey- 
church at the tomb of Lady Mary, his late wife, and of himself at 
certain services. For finding the wax he grants 2 marks out of 
his lands of Pitfour. As exemplified in R.M.S., p. 36, No. 94. 

(29.) 1355-57. Undated charter of Thomas, Earl of Mar, 
granting to Sir Robert de Erskyne, knight and his wife, Cristiana de 
Kethe, certain lands in Garioch, together with four marks annual 
rent due by the abbot and convent of Lindores out of the land 
of Flandres. Collections for History of Aberdeen and Banff, p. 536. 

(30.) 1358, July 31, Dundee. King David 11. confirms Earl 
Duncan's grant, No. 25. From Haddington's Collection of Charters 
,in Advocates' Library. Printed by Turnbull in LL., p. 43. 

(31.) 1364, August 3, Lindores. King David n. confirms, with 
exemplification, Sir David de Lyndesay's grant of Nov. 19, 1355. 
R.M.S., p. 37, No. 94. 

(3 2.) 1 364, August 3, Lindores. King David n. grants to Lindores 
half the land of Estir Cragy in the barony of Parnbogall (Barn- 
bougie), in the county of Edinburgh, which was resigned into his 
hands for the purpose by Bartholomew de Loone, knight, and 
Philippa, his spouse, daughter and heiress of Philip de Moubray, 
knight, on condition that a Mass should be said at the altar of 
St. Michael in the abbey-church for the souls of the donors, etc. 
R.M.S.,p. 39, No. 101. 

(33.) 1364, September 20, Dundee. King David n. confirms the 
charter of King Alexander n. (exemplified with witnesses) which 
appears in our Chartulary without witnesses (No. cxx.) ; and adds 
that the lands of Cragy of Milton and of Claypottys [near Dundee] 
and of Balmaw [see No. xxxvi.], of which the monastery was 
infeft, should be held quit of all service. RM.S., p. 36, No. 92. 

(34.) 1367, July 4, Stirling. King David n. grants to Sir Robert 
de Erskyne, knight, and his wife certain lands in Garioch ' now 
in our hands for a certain reason ' [compare No. 29], including 4 



294 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

marks annual rent paid by Lindores out of the land of Flandres. 
Collections, Aberdeen and Banff] 539. 

(35.) 1380. Petition to the Pope by William of Angus, abbot 
of Lindores : (1) For a faculty to hear confessions (because 
mortality was rife in Scotland) of all persons, secular and regular, 
lay and clerical, and to absolve them even in cases reserved to the 
Apostolic See, and to enjoin suitable penance ; (2) On behalf of 
Thomas de Kilconkar for a canonry in Moray, notwithstanding 
that he has the church of Monymel ; (3) On behalf of Augustine 
de Gogare, priest, for a benefice in the gift of Dunfermline, not- 
withstanding that he has the church of Gogare. C.P.R., Pet. i. 
557. 

(36.) 1382, October 1, Chateauneuf, in the diocese of Avignon. 
Clement vn. (Anti-Pope) to the Bishop of Brechin and the officials 
of St. Andrews and Dunkeld, to summon those concerned in a 
dispute between John Steil who had intruded himself into the 
office of abbot and the abbot William. Further, to take order in 
respect to Lindores (various details). C.P.R., iv. 248-49. 

(37.) 1392, March 23, Perth. King Robert HI. confirms to David 
of Abirkedor the security of certain rents in Dundee belonging 
to the monastery for a loan of 7 marks made by the said David 
to the monastery. R.M.S., p. 207, No. 35. 

(38.) 1402, November 8, Kyndromi (Kildmmmy}. Isabella de 
Douglas, Lady of Mar and of Garioch in her widowhood, for the 
weal of her soul, etc., grants to Lindores the patronage and 
advowson of the church of Codilstane (Coldstone) in Mar ; and on 
the death or resignation of Simon, then rector, they might 
convert the church in proprios usus, if confirmation of the grant 
could be obtained. Warrandice against all deadly. Denmyln 
Charters in Advocates' Library : printed by Turnbull in LL., 
p. 49. 1 

(39.) 1414, March 26, Tortosa. Benedict xm. (Anti-Pope) in 
answer to a petition grants that, whereas the monastery of St 
Mary, Lindores, has its buildings ruined and its rents diminished 
by reason of the nearness of the wild (silvestriuni) Scots, the church 
of Crech (Criech in Fife) in the diocese of St. Andrews, value 

1 Presumably the Bishop of Aberdeen refused confirmation, as Coldstone 
continued to be a prebendal church of Aberdeen. See Regist. Aberdon., ii. 255. 
Thomas, Earl of Mar, presented to Codlystanys in 1374. C. P. R., iv. 198. 



APPENDIX III 295 

12lb., should be appropriated to it. This to take effect on the 
death of the rector, Laurence of Lindores ; a perpetual vicar, with 
fit stipend, being then appointed. C.PM., Pet. i. 601. 

(40.) 1451, May 10. King James [n.] grants to the abbot and 
convent the lands of Perkhill with the office of keeper (custodia) 
of the royal wood of Irneside, with the emoluments (prqficuis] 
pertaining to said office, to be held in frankalmoign. Reddendo, 
devout prayers. R.M.S., ii. No. 445. 

(41.) 1451, May 21, Edinburgh. King James u. to the sheriffs of 
Fife. Inasmuch as he had granted to the abbot and convent of 
Lindores his lands of Parkhill, in the county of Fife, and also the 
office of forester of his wood of Earnside [see No. 40] in the lands 
of Parkhill, he commands these, conjointly or severally, to give 
sasine of the lands and office of forester to the abbot and convent 
or to their attorney bearing these presents. LL., 18-19- 

(42.) 1457, July 4, Lindores. John, abbot, and the convent grant 
to their burgesses of Newburgh by this indenture the land called 
Wodrufe and the hill contiguous to the south part of Wodrufe 
[inarches detailed], Faciendo, homage and service used and wont ; 
reddendo, forty bolls of barley annually at Easter. In default of 
payment the grantors reserve right to distrain ; and, in the event 
of failure to pay the full rent for three successive terms to resume 
the lands into their own hands until the arrears with expenses 
have been fully paid. Other details and limitations of the grant. 
LL., pp. 5-7. 

(43.) 1457, July 13. Instrument on the renewal, by John, the 
abbot, and the convent, of the rights, privileges, and a new 
infeftment of the lands of the burgh of Newburgh, narrating two 
charters in favour of the burgesses. The first of these is No. CLII. 
of our Chartulary ; the second is (in substance) the indenture of 
July 4 (No. 42). There is added the obligation that the burgesses 
shall grind all grain, whether grown on their lands or purchased, 
at the mill called Cragmill, the multure being one-sixteenth for 
wheat, and one twenty-first for malting-barley and oats. In the 
Charter-chest of Newburgh, a translation being given in Lindores 
Abbey, pp. 479-483. 

(44.) 1470, October 18. The bailies and community of Newburgh 
grant in perpetual feu-ferme to John Vallange a piece of land 
belonging to the chapel of St. Katherine the Virgin of the said 



296 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

burgh, to be held in fee and heritage. Reddendo, 8 shillings 
for the reparation of the said chapel and the maintenance of a 
chaplain to celebrate divine service therein, and 12 pence 
Scots to the abbot and convent for burgh mail. Translated from 
original in Newburgh Charter-chest by Mr. A. Laing, Lindores 
Abbey, p. 510. 

(45.) 1471, July 6. David Spalding, burgess of Dundee, grants 
to Lindores, for the weal of his soul and of the soul of Isabella, 
his wife, his land in Market Street, Dundee ; also 30 shillings 
annual rent from the toft of the abbey between the vennel called 
Spalding's Wynd and the land of the late Thomas Leis. He 
reserves the freehold for the lives of himself and wife. Reddendo, 
3lb. 6s. 8d., and 20s. ; the twenty shillings to be paid to the altar 
of St. Margaret, behind the great altar of the church of St. Mary, 
Dundee, and 3lb. 6s. 8d. for the reparation of the choir of the said 
church. R.M.S., ii. No. 1279. 

(46.) 1 474, May 1 8, Lindores. John, abbot of Lindores, increases 
from 2lb. to 4lb. per annum the allowance made to his monks in 
priest's orders for their habits and ornatus. To this the consent 
of the ordinary Patrick [Graham], Bishop of St. Andrews, had 
been given at the time of his visitation. LL., pp. 23-24. 

(47.) 1476, April 8, Lindores. Andrew [Cavers], abbot of 
Lindores, and the convent, with unanimous consent lease to 
George Muncrefe of Tybermolloke the lands of Exmagirdle in 
the earldom of Strathern and county of Perth, the mills and 
multures, with all the garbal tithes, altarages and small tithes of 
the parish church, for George's life-time. He is to have the right 
to sublet to his mother, younger brothers, labourers and farmers, 
( being less in power than George himself/ but to none others. 
Rent, 40 marks usual money, payable at the two usual terms, 
with four dozen fat capons (otherwise 12d. for each capon) and 
accustomed services. Other conditions. LL., pp. 21-22. 

(48.) 1476-77, February 22. David Spalding's grant (No. 45) is 
confirmed under the Great Seal. R.M.S., ii. No. 1279. 

(49.) 1478, May 20, Lindores. Andrew, abbot, and the convent 
grant a rood of land in their burgh [situation defined] to David 
Hathintown their quarrier for faithful service in the past, and 
looking for like service in future. Reddendo, twelve pence Scots 
yearly with services used and wont in the burgh Charter-chest of 
Newburgh, full abstract in Lindores Abbey, p. 485. 



APPENDIX III 297 

(50.) 1479, May IS, Lindores. Andrew [Cavers], abbot, with the 
unanimous consent of the chapter, lets to their ' special friends,' 
Dionysius Chalmers (Cameris) and his son William, to each an 
eighth part of the lands of Grange in the parish of Ebdy and 
county of Fife. Rental and various conditions stated. LL., 
pp. 19-21. 

(51.) 1481, May 25. Charter of John Wyntoun, priest of the 
diocese of St. Andrews and burgess of Newburgh, granting to his 
brother, Thomas Wyntoun, also a burgess of Newburgh, his land 
and tenement in the burgh, to be held of the abbot and convent 
of Lindores. Charter-chest of Newburgh, translated in Laing's 
Lindores Abbey, pp. 510-511. 

(52.) 1493, July 25. John de Covintre of Mukdrum had been 
adjudged by the Lords of Council to pay one hundred and sixty 
marks to Andrew, abbot, and the convent of Lindores. Having 
no moveable goods that might be distrained, eight mark-lands of 
the lands of Mukdrum were assigned to the monastery. But 
George, Earl of Rothes, refused infeftment to the abbey. The 
king, James rv., confirms the arrangement; Covintre and his heirs 
to be allowed to resume the land if the debt and expenses are 
paid within seven years. R.M.S., ii. 21 68. 

(53.) 1500, November 9, Perth. John Oliphant of Drone, and 
lord of Petcaithley, sold and alienated for a sum of money half 
the lands of Petcaithley, which he held of the king in feu-ferme, 
to the abbot Andrew and the convent. Reddendo, a penny pro 
albajirma. As exemplified in next. 

(54.) 1500, November 6 (sic), Edinburgh. [The dates of the 
charter and confirmation exhibit some error.] James iv. confirms 
No. 53.R.M.S., ii. 2553. 

(55.) 1501, November 6. Decreet arbitral by Patrick Wellis, 
Provost of Perth, and eight others, judges arbiters 'commonly 
chosen' between Andrew, abbot of Lindores, the convent and 
their successors, on the one part, and the bailies, council, and 
community of Newburgh on the other part. [Chiefly concerned 
with the election of bailies, and the multures due to the abbey.] 
In the Charter-chest of Newburgh f and printed in full in Laing's 
Lindores Abbey, pp. 491-495. 

(56.) 1502, May 13, Lindores. The abbot (Andrew), and convent 
enter into an obligation to pay four persons (named), being 



298 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

burgesses of Aberdeen, 283lbs. 6s. 8d. (Scots) for the payment 
to their proctor, Stephen Orme, in Flanders or Zealand before 
10th August of lOOlbs. of Flemish ' grossi.' The payment to the 
Aberdeen burgesses was to be spread over some time. On the 
18th August they were to receive from the monastery two hun- 
dred marks [133lbs. 6s. 8d.] Scots ; at Martinmas ' or thereby ' 75lbs. 
Scots; and at Whitsunday 'or thereby' in 1503, another 75lbs. 
Scots. The bond was over the goods of the monastery, moveable 
and immoveable. Common seal of chapter. ZX., 27, 28. 

(57.) 1502, October 1, Lindores. Obligation of the abbot and 
convent to Andrew Charters to the amount of 60lbs. ' usual money 
of the kingdom of Scotland ' for the payment by Andrew or his 
factors to them or their proctors of 20lbs. of ' grossi/ to be paid in 
Flanders or Zealand within six days of the sight of the obligation, 
the 60lbs. Scots to be paid within forty days after the receipt of 
the acquittance of the monks' proctors for the 20lbs. of ' grossi.' A 
similar obligation is made to Alexander Tyri, burgess of Perth, to 
the amount of 30lbs. Scots for lOlbs. of c grossi.' A similar obliga- 
tion to Robert Clerk alias Vobster, burgess of Perth, to the 
amount of 30lbs. Scots for lOlbs. of ' grossi/ all to be paid to the 
proctors of the monks in Flanders or Zealand. The bonds were 
over all the goods, moveable and immoveable, of the monastery. 
LL., 25-26. 

(58.) 1502-3,, March 20, Lindores. Bond given by the abbot 
(Henry Orme) and the convent to John Quhitsum, burgess of 
Perth, his heirs and assignees, for 105lbs. 10s. Scots, on account 
of his causing to be paid 30lbs. of ' grossi ' 3s. and 4 ' grossi ' 
(Flemish) to their procurator, Master Hugh Mertini (? Martinson), 
rector of Weym, and on account of a debt, previously due to 
Quhitsum, of 1 Olbs. Scots. Payment was to be made to Quhitsum, 
after the monks had seen the receipt of their procurator, on the 
feast of St. Laurence (10 August) of the same year (1503). 
LL., 28-9. 

(59.) 1503, October 23. Confirmed 1503, November 21. William 
Cavers is granted by the abbot, Henry, ' duplam sive binam 
partem' of the lands of Mukdrum for 160 marks. Tenend. 'a. 
monasterio de rege.' R.M.S., ii. No. 2758. 

(60.) 1506, August 12. Confirmation of the charter of Dionisius 
Cavers to Stephen Orm, burgess of Newburgh. Dionisius exchanges 



APPENDIX III 299 

the ' duplam sive binam partem ' of Mukdrum for rents estimated 
at 8 marks and 14 pence annually. R.M.S., ii. No. 2985. 

(61.) 1508, April 5. Instrument of sasine. Andrew Cavers, 
' pensionary of Lindores/ l resigns certain lands in the burgh of 
Newburgh, and John Malcumsone, as procurator of a chaplain 
who was to serve in the new kirk to be built in the burgh to the 
honour of SS. Duthac, Katherine, and Mary Magdalene, is given 
sasine of the same. Nenburgh Charter-Chest ; given in translation 
in Lindores Abbey, pp. 511-512. 

(62.) 1510, November 7. King James iv. erects the lands of 
Lindores into a Regality. R.M.S., iii. No. 12. 

(63.) 1513, July 12. Confirmation to Thomas Fodringham of the 
lands of Haltoun and Pethous de Inverarite, from which 5 marks 
were to be paid yearly to the abbot and convent of Lindores. 
R.M.S., iii. No. 3861. 

(64.) 1514, April 5. The erection of the Regality confirmed in 
Parliament. R.M.S., iii. No. 12. 

(65.) 1515, May 28, Edinburgh. Balthasar Stuerd (Stuerdus), 
protonotary of the Apostolic See, gives authority to Walter Lesle 
and Henry White, canons of Dunkeld, to induct Walter Marsar, 
presbyter of the diocese of St. Andrews, into the vicarage of 
Auchtermuchty, to which he had been presented by the favour 
of the abbot of Lindores. Laing Charters, No. 308. 

(66.) 1516, June 6, Edinburgh. Confirmation to Sir John Lundin 
of Lundin of a charter concerning the patronage of the parish 
church of Largo, which patronage, under certain circumstances, 
was to fall to the abbot and convent of Lindores. R.M.S., iii. 
No. 78. 

(67.) 1516, September 16, Lindores. Henry, abbot, and the 
convent grant a tack to Sir John Stirling of Keir, knight, of their 
lands of Benee and Catkin within the sheriffdom of Perth and their 
regality of Lindores, together with the teind-sheaves for nineteen 
years, at a rent of twelve pounds usual money, multure, hariage 
and carriage. The Stirlings of Keir, pp. 309, 310. 

(68.) 1 521, May 23. ' Appointment' between Gavin, Bishop of 
Aberdeen (for him and his chapter), and Henry, abbot of Lindores 

1 Cavers had resigned the abbacy in favour of Henry Orme in 1502. 



300 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

(for him and his convent) 'anent the debatable lands betwix 
Rothmaissand Tulymorgond and the peit moss callit off Malyngsyd 
and Bonytoune of Rayne.' Regist. Aberdon., i. 386. 

(69.) 1532, October 5, Lindores. John, abbot, and the convent 
grant a tack to Sir John Stirling of Keir, knight, of their lands 
of Beny and Caitkin, together with the teind-sheaves for twelve 
pounds usual money, with multure, hariage and carriage. They 
also appoint him their bailie for the lands of Feddallis (Estir and 
Westir) and Beny : for which office he was to pay two marks usual 
money. Stirling* of Keir, pp. 346-9- 

(70.) 1535, October p. Tack granted by John, the abbot, and the 
convent of Lindores to David Weddirburne, burgess of Dundee, 
and Elen Lausoun, his spouse, and the heirs male of David, of half 
the lands of Hiltoun of Cragy [near Dundee]. Confirmed under 
Great Seal, 10 Feb. 1538. R.M.S., iii. No. 1913. 

(71.) 1537, March 16, Lindores. Tack by the abbot and con- 
vent to James Wod of Inchebrek and Giles (Egidie) Straithauchin, 
his spouse, of the lands of Hall of Witstoun, Fischerhill, and Hill- 
end in the Mernes. Confirmed under the Great Seal, 8 April 
1542. RM.6\, iii. No. 2636. 

(72.) 1541, September 29, Perth. Grant by the King to Patrick 
Balfoure of Dene-mylne of the mill called the Denemylne and 
other properties, for rent, reserving to the abbot and convent of 
Lindores an annual payment of 53 shillings and 4 pence, and a 
duplicand on entrance of heirs, etc. R.M.S., iii. No. 2460. 

(73.) 1544, April 29, Lindores. John, abbot, and the convent to 
Master Dionisius Chalmer and John Calvy, bailies of their burgh 
of Newburgh. Precept of sasine of certain lands in the burgh 
[described] to Henry Philp. Charter-chest of Newburgh : full ab- 
stract in Lindores Abbey, p. 487. 

(74.) 1545, June 26, Lindores. Charter of feu-ferme by the abbot 
John and the convent to William Galloway, brother's son of Master 
Alexander Galloway, canon of Aberdeen, of the lands of Kyrktoun 
of Culsalmond. Precept of sasine the same day. Regist. Aberdon., 
i. 430. 

(75.) 1558, February 4, Lindores. Abbot John grants a tack of 
eight oxgates of the lands of Grange and Berry-hill [near New- 
burgh] to Alexander and Agnes Ballingall. Confirmed, 1565, 
May 31.R.M.S., iv. No. 1631. 



APPENDIX III 301 

(76.) 1559, January 12, Lmdores. Abbot John and the convent 
grant a tack of the mill under the rock, called Craigmylne to John 
Carmichael and Euphame Murray, his putative wife. Confirmed, 
1566-67, Feb. 24. R.M.S., iv. No. 1771. 

(77.) 1560, September 8, Lmdores. Abbot John and the convent 
grant a tack of land near Newburgh to John Calve and Katherine 
Dysart, his spouse. Confirmed, 1574, Nov. 12. R.M.S., iv. No. 
2326. 

(78.) 1562, May 6, Lindores. Abbot John and the convent grant 
a tack of the lands of Eglismagirl to George Halyburtoun and 
Elizabeth Leirmonth. Conjtrmed, 1568, Sept. 22. R.M.S., iv. 
No. 1832. 

(79.) 1563, February 20, Lindores. Abbot John and the convent 
appoint David Barclay of Cullerny and his heirs male bailies of 
the abbey-lands. Conjtrmed, 1567, April 26. R.M.S., iv. No. 
1787. 

(80.) 1564, February 10, Lindores. Abbot John and the convent 
grant tack of lands, near Lindores, to Henry Orme of Mugdrum. 
Confirmed, 1516-7, March 20. R.M.S., iv. No. 2666. 

(8 1.) 1564, March 2, Lindores. John [Philp], abbot, and the 
convent grant, for money paid, f to our beloved cousin James 
Philp of Ormestoun and Margaret Forrett, his spouse, their heirs,' 
etc., at feu-ferme, the wood, two rabbit-warrens, and the Quhyte 
Park [particulars as to locality], in our barony and regality of Lin- 
dores, within the shire of Fife. Rent lOlbs., and three suits at the 
three head courts in the burgh of Newburgh, etc. 

Given in full, from a certified copy which belonged to David 
Laing, in Lindores Abbey, p. 488. A few other writs are noticed in 
Appendix vn. 



APPENDIX IV 

AN ATTEMPT TO ASCERTAIN THE SUCCESSION OF 
THE ABBOTS OF LINDORES, WITH OCCASIONAL 
NOTES ON SOME EVENTS CONNECTED WITH THE 
HISTORY OF THE ABBEY. 

i. Bower, in his additions to Fordun, states that in 1178 
' William, King of Scotland, founded the monastery of Arbroath, 
and in the same year David, Earl of Huntingdon, his brother, 



302 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

founded the monastery of Lindores ' (Scotichron. viii. 25). None of 
the documents extant go to support so early a date for the founda- 
tion of the latter monastery. Nor is Bower's statement consistent 
with his own subsequent account of the length of time during 
which the first abbot occupied the headship of the house. He 
represents Guido as dying on the very day on which the founder 
died, that is, Monday, 17th June 1219, adding that he had ruled 
the monastery vigorously for twenty-eight years (ibid. ix. 27). This 
latter statement, if we accept it, would place the appointment of 
Guido in 1191* which falls in tolerably well with what the docu- 
mentary evidence would lead us to believe possible. 

We find ' Wydo ' (a variant of ' Guido ') witnessing a charter 
together with Adam, abbot of Cupar (Regist. Vet. de Aberbrothoc, 
p. 14*6). But we learn on the authority of the Chronicle of Melrose 
(s.a.) that Adam resigned the abbacy of Cupar in 1 194-. 1 

Guido had been a monk of Kelso ; and the quitclaim of his 
obedience and subjection granted by O[sbert], abbot of Kelso, 
which will be found printed at p. 284-, is in the opinion of the 
editor the earliest notice yet discovered of the monastery. Guido 
is still only elect ; therefore we are probably not wrong in con- 
sidering it prior to the testing clause in the charter which has 
been already referred to, where he appears as abbot. 

From Osbert's quitclaim we also learn that monks had been lent 
from Kelso for the purpose of erecting the buildings at Lindores. 

The first papal confirmation, the ' Great Charter ' of Pope Celes- 
tine in., is dated 8th March 1195. Besides the grants of Earl 
David this bull confirms grants by King William, and by Robert 
of London, ' as in the charters of the donors is contained.' There 
seems, on the whole, to be no good reason for questioning that, in 
accordance with Bower's second statement, the monastery had its 
inception in 1191. It is not improbable that Charters iv., vi., vn., 
xni. xiv., LXXXV., and possibly some others, may be earlier than 
Celestine's bull. 

The monastery was built from its foundations, and most of the 
outbuildings (officinae) were completed before the death of abbot 
Guido (Scotichron. ix. 27). There were twenty-six monks in the 



1 I owe this early reference to Mr. R. Aitkin. 

In the Registrant Monasterii S. Marie de Cambuskenneth there is a charter 
of the prior of St. Andrews (dated by the editor as * c. 1215 '), which is witnessed 
by ' Y. abbate de Lundores.' This must no doubt be for ' Ydo,' for Wydo 
(Guido). 



APPENDIX IV 303 

house at the time of Guide's death ; and the number never seems 
to have surpassed this figure. 

In the year immediately preceding the death of Guido the 
monastery was visited by the prior of Durham. He, in company 
with the archdeacon of the East Riding of York, had been going 
through Scotland, at the command of the Papal Legate, Gualo, 
to absolve the country from the interdict, which had been inflicted 
on the whole realm on account of the support given by King 
Alexander to Louis of France in his contest with John, King of 
England. During this visit the chamber in which the prior of 
Durham and his attendant monks were sleeping took fire. Nearly 
suffocated by the smoke, he escaped with difficulty. Though much 
exhausted, he succeeded in travelling on his homeward journey as 
far as the monastery of Coldingham, where he expired (Chron. de 
Mailr. s.a. 1218). The fire is said by the chronicler to have been 
caused ' per incuriam et prodigalitatem pincernarum.' 

On 9th November in the seventeenth year of the Pope's 
pontificate (i.e. 9th Nov. 1214) Gfuido], abbot of Lindores, was 
appointed a judge-delegate by Innocent HI. (Regist. de Cambus- 
kenneth, p. 149). 

2. John (i.), a monk of the house, succeeded Gualo, probably in 
1219 (Scotichron. ix. 27). The length of his tenure of office is 
unknown ; but we find John, abbot of Lindores, witnessing a 
charter between 1232 and 1237, and others in 1240 and 1244 
(Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, pp. 303-4 ; Collections for a History of the 
Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, pp. 548, 565). ' J., abbot of Lin- 
dores/ is a papal judge-delegate in 1242 (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, 
p. 382). He appears as abbot in our Chartulary in Nos. xix., XXVIH., 
LIV., LVIII., and Lxxni. 1 

3. The third abbot was Thomas (i.) who, according to Bower 
(and he is not lavish of eulogy), was vir magnae sanctitatis. The 
date of his succession is not recorded, but we find him appointed 
a judge-delegate by Pope Alexander iv. on 13th January 1257 
(Regist. Prior. S. Andree, p. 391). He had a dispute with the Bishop 
of Aberdeen as to the boundaries of certain lands in Garioch, which 
was settled in 1259 (Regist. Aberdon. i. 26). He and the Prior of 
Lindores served as papal judges-delegate in 1261 (Regist. Prior. S. 
Andree, pp. 391-2). 

1 The latest notice I have found is his witnessing a deed at Aberdeen on the 
day of St. Vitalis (28th April), 1244 (Regist. Priorat. S. Andree, p. 304). 



304 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

In the time of Abbot Thomas, Alexander in., accompanied by 
the Justiciar of Scotland, Alexander Cumyn, Earl of Buchan, and 
the Great Chamberlain, William, ItLarl of Mar, visited the abbey 
(14th March 1265). On this occasion the king made a grant of 
the woods and lands of Lindores (already belonging the monks) 
as 'in liberam forestam' (Lib. S. Mar. de Lundoris, p. 11). This 
was probably a little return for the hospitality of the abbey. 

Thomas had served as one of the auditors of the Royal Exchequer 
in 1264 (Exchequer Rolls, i. 11). Thomas died in 1273 (Scotichron. 
x. 33). 

4. The prior of the monastery, John (n.), succeeded. He died 
in the following year, and was buried at Kelso (? 127 ^(Scotichron. 
x. 33, 34). 

The next abbot was Nicholas the Cellarer. In the Benedictine 
monasteries the office of cellarer was one of dignity and great 
influence. To a large extent the management of the property 
of the house fell under his hands. There are many examples of 
those holding the office of cellarer being advanced to the office 
of abbot, of their own or of another house. It was so at Jedde- 
worth (Jedburgh) in 1174, at Melrose in 1214, and at Newbottle 
in the same year, and again at Melrose, as also at Balmerino, in 
1236. Nicholas was abbot in 1281 (No. cxxv.). It was probably 
in his time that the heir-apparent of the Scottish throne, 
Alexander, elder and only surviving son of Alexander m., died at 
Lindores on 28th January 1284, in his twentieth year, to the 
grief and consternation of the whole kingdom. The body of the 
prince was removed from Lindores to Dunfermline for burial 
(Scotichron. x. 37). 

5. We find a new abbot, John (in.), in 1289. He was then 
carrying on a law-suit with Devorgulla de Balliol concerning the 
patronage of the church of Whissendene. See Introduction, p. 1. ; 
Bain's Calendar, ii. No. 379, and Stevenson's Documents Illustrative 
of the History of Scotland, i. 94-5. 

On 23rd July 1291, Edward i. of England visited the abbey; 
and John, the abbot, with others, having touched the Host, and 
kissed the Gospels, at the great altar of the abbey-church, swore 
fealty to the King of England (Ragman Roll, p. 16). 

In 1294 (August 1) John de Balliol, King of Scotland, visited 
the abbey, accompanied with some of his officers of state 
(Spalding Club Miscellany, ii. 3 1 3). Two years later the English 



APPENDIX IV 305 

king, Edward i., was at Scone on 8th August 12.96, when he 
ordered the removal of the coronation-stone of the Scottish kings 
to Westminster. He arrived at Lindores on the following day, 
and remained till the 10th. 

6. By this time it would appear there was a new abbot. At all 
events a few weeks later, on 28th August, we find the abbot of 
Lindores, by name Thomas (n.), together with most of the 
Scottish abbots, swearing fealty to Edward at Berwick-on-Tweed 
(Stevenson's Documents, etc., ii. 68 ; Ragman Rolls, p. 11 6). 

7. On 12th July 1298, William Wallace gained an important 
victory over the English troops under Aymer de Valence, Earl of 
Pembroke, in the neighbourhood of the abbey, and thither the 
weary Scots resorted after the battle for rest and refreshment. 
Ironside, the site of the battle (the exact spot is disputed), is 
the ' Hyrneside ' of our Chartulary. According to Blind Harry 

' The Priour fled and durst na recknyng bide ; 
He was befor apon the tother syde.' 

(Book ix. lines 1123-24). 

The Prince of Wales (afterwards Edward n.) spent from 
Tuesday, 7th April, to Thursday, 9th April 1304, at Lindores 
(Bain's Calendar, ii. No. 1516). 

On 30th April 1305 Edward i. gave a protection to the abbot 
and convent for one year (ibid. No. 1717). 

Under the year 1306, Sir James Balfour, who as Lord of 
Denmylne had not improbably special sources of information as 
to Lindores, recounts, f This zeire ther was a mutuall endenture 
made betwix Sir Gilbert Hay of Erole, Sir Neill Campbell of 
Lochaw, and Sir Alexander Setton, knights, at the abbey of 
Londors, to defend King Robert and hes croune to the last of 
ther bloodes and fortunes; wpone the sealling of the said in- 
denture, they solemly toke the sacrament at St. Maries altar in 
the said abbey-churche.' (Historical Works, i. 89). Macfarlane 
has a notice of an indenture between Sir Gilbert Hay, Sir Neil 
Campbell, and Sir Christopher Seton, assigned to 1310, and 
witnessed by Gilbert, abbot of Cambuskenneth. See Regist. de 
Cambuskenneth, pp. lii-liii. 

8. It would appear that there was a new abbot in 1307. In 
December in that year Pope Clement v., in his confirmation of 
Nicholas de Balmy le to the bishopric of Dunblane, recounts that 
among the cornpromissarii, to whom the election had been intrusted, 



306 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

were Maurice of Inchaffray, William of Lindores, and Michael of 
Cambuskenneth, canons of Dunblane (Theiner, Monumenta, p. 178). 
Maurice, abbot of Inchaffray, is well known to history ; but 
Michael of Cambuskenneth and William of Lindores have not 
hitherto appeared among the abbots of these houses. Nor is the 
editor aware of any other evidence in favour of these two persons 
being abbots. Still it is worth calling attention to the facts 
stated, and to the conjecture that here we have the names of 
abbots of their respective monasteries. 

9. The abbot of Lindores (his name is not recorded) was present 
in the Parliament held by Robert i. at Cambuskenneth (6th Nov. 
1314), some months after the Battle of Bannockburn. 

10. The succession of abbots at this time is obscure. The next 
notice of an abbot of Lindores is that of Adam, who witnessed 
(30th June 1331) a grant of John de Dundemor to the neighbour- 
ing monastery of Balmerino (Lib. S. Marie de Balmorinach, p. 41). 
We find Adam still abbot in 1342, when he is said to have 
witnessed a charter of David n. (Father Hay's Scotia Sacra, 
referred to in Turnbull's Introduction to Lib. de S. Marie de 
Balmorinach.) During Adam's tenure of office, or not long after, 
Duncan, Earl of Fife, in the year 1350, granted to Lindores 
the neighbouring parish church of Uchtermukedy (Auchtermuchty) 
in proprios usus. This gift was in fulfilment of a vow made after 
his escape from death at the battle of Durham in 1346. 
The original deed of Earl Duncan is dated at Lindores 16th 
March 1350. It was confirmed by King David, 31st July of 
the same year. So far, as regards the temporal conveyance of the 
church ; but more was necessary, and William (Landels), Bishop 
of St. Andrews, with the consent of his chapter, confirmed the 
grant, 12th April 1352, while the ratification of the appropriation 
was not given till 4th December 1354 by Innocent vi. The 
various steps in the process of transfer may be traced from the 
writ of David's confirmation, printed from the original in Lib. S. 
Marie de Lundoris, p. 43, and the Calendar of Papal Registers, iii. 
539, 540. 

n. The Great Seal Register contains a confirmation by David n. 
(granted at Lindores, 3rd August 1364) of a charter of Sir David 
Lindsay of Crawford, the old friend and warm supporter of Robert 
the Brus, in which he burdens his ' lands of Pethfour, near my 
land of Carny ' with a charge of two marks a year to provide six 



APPENDIX IV 307 

stones of wax for a light to be burned daily ' in quadam pelve ' 
at ' our tomb/ that is of Lady Mary, his late wife., and of himself, 
in the choir of the abbey-church of Lindores, at the Mass, mattins, 
and vespers of our Lady, and all solemnities when copes were 
worn. This deed was executed at Lindores on 19th November 
1355 (Reg. Mag. Sig. i. 36, No. 94). The editor has been unable 
to find the evidence for the statement of Mr. Alexander Laing 
(Lindores Abbey, p. 94), that Sir David de Lindsay ' retired to 
Lindores, and spent the last of his days in the quiet of its retire- 
ment.' It is to be hoped that the evidence is of a more satisfactory 
kind than what is alleged by Lord Lindsay in his Lives of the 
Lindsays (i. 50). After relating the mortification of the wax, 
Lord Lindsay adds ( he had probably retired thither (to Lindores) 
to die, as his name nowhere occurs subsequently to that period/ 
There may be evidence unknown to the editor for Mr. Laing's 
positive statement, but till it is produced one cannot but suspect 
that conjecture of Lord Lindsay, for which he certainly adduces 
nothing that deserves the name of evidence, has, by a process not 
unknown to the students of the methods by which history is 
created, become solidified into fact. The story is not unnaturally 
accepted in Mr. A. H. Rea's pleasing and popularly written 
Lindores Abbey and its Historical Associations (1902), where the 
account runs that Sir David, ' after a long active public career, 
retired to the seclusion of the monastery to pass the remainder 
of his days in peaceful meditation.' It is a pleasing and attractive 
picture, but one cannot but ask, ' Is it true ? ' 

It would seem that the instrument of Sir David de Lindsay was 
kept at Lindores awaiting a favourable opportunity for obtaining 
the royal confirmation. However this may be, King David n., 
who must have been visiting Lindores, gave his confirmation under 
the Great Seal on 3rd August 1364. On the same day, and at the 
same place (Lindores), the king similarly confirmed a grant to the 
monastery of the lands of Cragy, in the barony of Parnbogall (now 
Barnbougle), in the sheriffdom of Edinburgh, made by Sir Bar- 
tholomew de Loone and Philippa de Moubray, his wife, in return 
for which the monks were bound to say Mass for the souls of the 
donors, and of all the faithful departed, at the altar of St. Michael 
in the abbey church (Reg. Mag. Sig. i. 39, No. 101). 

Another visit was paid to Lindores by the king, probably 
towards the end of his life : for we find in the Chamberlain Rolls 
for 1372 (the accounts for Fife) the sum of vj.lbs.-xiij.s.-iv.d. 



308 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

allowed for the expenses of the late king, when he kept Christmas 
at Lindores. 

12. The succession of the abbots after Adam is not clearly 
ascertained. Mr. A. Laing (Lindores Abbey, p. 97) refers to a 
charter in the charter-chest of Pittodrie, printed in the Collections 

for the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, pp. 537-8), as a proof that 
William was abbot of Lindores at some time between 1355 and 
1357. But a reference to the text shows that the crucial words 
' de Lundoris ' have been supplied by the editor. There was an 
abbot of Lindores in Parliament at Scone on 7th September 
1367; but unfortunately he is not named. There is an abbot 
named Roger, who is spoken of in the time when Stele held 
possession as ' the late abbot Roger' (Cal. Pap. Regist. iv. 249), and 
who witnessed an undated charter, which has been assigned to 
some time between 1373 and 1381 (Historical Records of the 
Family of Lindsay, i. 25). 

13. John Stele (or Steil), formerly prior of Coldingham 
(Scotichron. xi. 24 ; he is described in the letter of Clement vn. 
(Anti-Pope) as a monk of Lindores), was appointed abbot about 
1380, apparently in defiance of a provision obtained from Clement 
vir. (Anti-Pope) on behalf of one William. This William, who is 
styled ' William de Angus,' as abbot of Lindores petitioned Clement 
vir. sometime in 1380 for a faculty to hear the confessions of all 
persons, regular and secular, clerical and lay, and to absolve them, 
even in cases reserved to the Apostolic See, and to enjoin salutary 
penance. This he prayed for because mortality was rife in Scot- 
land (CaL Pap. Reg. (Petit.) i. 557). If we may venture on con- 
jecture, Stele had been elected by the monks more canonico; and 
it is certain that William failed to obtain possession. It is plain 
that the majority of the monks were on the side of Stele, for from 
a letter of Clement vn. we learn that William himself, with three 
other monks, refusing to adhere to and obey John Stele, and 
fearing imprisonment and other evil treatment, had left the 
monastery. From the same letter it appears that Stele and his 
adherents had been excommunicated ; but nevertheless they held 
possession ; and so hopeless was the situation in the eyes of 
Clement that he wrote to the Bishops of Glasgow, Aberdeen, and 
Dunkeld to provide William, his nominee, to Dunfermline (if it 
were vacant) or any other monastery of the Benedictines, with the 
exception of Kelso and the houses of the Cistercian reform. 



APPENDIX IV 309 

Among other charges made against Stele to Clement vii. was that 
he had taken from one of the monks who adhered to William, 
his rival, besides books, vestments, and copes, a topaz valued at 
20lb., which had been committed to the said monk's custody by 
Roger, the late abbot. But this charge can be easily set aside if 
Stele held that he was Roger's legitimate successor (Letter of 
2nd March 1383, Cat. Pap. Regist. iv. pp. 246-249). William 
and his three followers were compelled to beg their bread for 
the space of two years ; and for his immediate relief Clement 
assigned to William a pension of 20 pounds from the abbatial 
memo, of Dunfermline (z'6zW.). Considering the all but universal 
adherence of Scotland to the Anti-Popes, this is a very curious 
episode, as to which one cannot but wish for more information. 

Whether this William is the ' William of Angus, abbot of Lin- 
dores/ who appears in a confirmation by King Robert in. (23rd 
March 1392) is uncertain. The confirmation unfortunately does 
not throw light on the date of the deed confirmed to which 
William was a party (Reg. Mag. Sig. i. 207, No. 35). 

14. The unfortunate Duke of Rothesay came to his untimely 
and mysterious end at the neighbouring castle of Falkland on 
26th (or early in the morning of 27th) March 1401. His body 
was removed to Lindores, and buried with little ceremony (Scoti- 
chron. xv. 12 ; Wyntoun, iii. 82). 

15. The succession of the abbots still remains in much obscurity. 
But a glimpse is afforded of the distressed condition of the monas- 
tery in the early part of the fifteenth century by a notice of a 
petition addressed to Benedict xin. (Anti-Pope). It was repre- 
sented that the buildings were ruined and the revenues diminished 
by reason of the nearness of the wild (silvestrium} Scots ; and a 
request was made that the parish church of Criech in Fife, not 
far from the abbey, should be appropriated to it. This petition 
was granted by Benedict in 1413, the appropriation to take effect 
on the death of the rector, Laurence of Lindores (Cat. Pap. Reg. 
(Petit.) i. 601). The next abbot whose name is known is James 
de Rossy, who appears as abbot 26th July 1426, when his seal 
(No. 6, Appendix vn.) was appended to a deed (Muniments of 
the Royal Burgh of Irvine, printed for the Ayrshire and Galloway 
Archaeological Association, 1890, vol. i. pp. 129-131). Some seven- 
teen years later he appears again on 10th March 1442-3 in an 
agreement between the monastery and the provost and bailies of 



310 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

Dundee with regard to the repair of the choir of the parish church 
(Regist. Brechin. pp. 90-95). He appears again on 28th June 1445 
(ibid. p. 103). This is the abbot for whose soul his nephew, Thomas 
Rossy, founded an anniversary in the abbey (No. CLI.). His seal is 
reproduced and described by Mr. Macdonald, Appendix vn. 

1 6. John (iv.) was the next abbot. If we count Stele, this 
John must be numbered John (v.). On 24th May 1457 he granted 
new charters to the burgesses of Newburgh (No. CLII.). Other 
charters of his, of the same year, will be found in Lib. S. Marie de 
Lundoris, pp. 1-8, 23. He is a witness in 1466 (Regist. Brechin. 
i. 193). On May 24th, 1474, John increases the allowance to 
monks of the abbey being in priest's orders, for their habits and 
ornatus, from 2lbs. to 4lbs. per annum (Lib. S. Marie de Lundoris, 
pp. 23-4). 

17. Andrew Cavers succeeded in 1475. On 26th June in that 
year he paid to the officials of the Roman Curia 187 gold florins 
and 25 shillings (Brady, Episcopal Succession, i. 197). Charters of 
abbot Andrew in 1476 and 1479 will be found in the Liber S. 
Marie de Lundoris (pp. 19-22). In 1485 we find Andrew witness- 
ing the marriage-contract of William, Earl of Erroll, and Elizabeth 
Leslie, daughter of the Earl of Rothes (Antiquities of Aberdeen and 
Batiff, iii. 138). He resigned before 12th June 1502 (see below), 
and after 27th March (Regist. Mag. Sig. ii. 559). He had been 
one of the monks of Lindores (Ib. ii. 257). 

1 8. About 1484 James, ninth Earl of Douglas, and sixth Duke 
of Turenne, was compulsorily secluded in the abbey of Lindores, 
where he spent the remainder of his days, and died 15th April 
1488. With him terminated the earlier branch of the noble house 
of Douglas. 

19. Henry Orme was provided to the abbacy by the Pope on 
12th June 1502, the vacancy being caused by the resignation of 
Andrew Cavers (Brady, Episcopal Succession, i. 197). We find 
Cavers alive, and styled ' Pensionary of Lindores/ at least as late 
as 1508. 

During the incumbency of Orme all the possessions of the 
abbey in Scotland were erected by James iv. into a Regality (7th 
Nov. 1510). And this grant was confirmed by James v. in Parlia- 
ment, 5th April 1514 (Regist. Mag. Sig. iii. No. 12). 

The tenure of Orme's office extended to 1523. In the previous 
year (9th March 1521-2) John, Duke of Albany, Governor of 



APPENDIX IV 311 

Scotland, wrote to Pope Adrian vr., stating that Henry, abbot of 
Lindores, who had much enlarged the buildings of the abbey, was 
now oppressed by the infirmities of old age, and felt himself 
unable to cope with the greed of courtiers, 1 and so had chosen 
John Philp, a professed monk of the house, being in priest's 
orders, to whom he desired to resign the abbacy. The petition of 
Orme, supported by the entreaties of the duke, was that the Pope 
would accept Orme's resignation and appoint Philp, reserving to 
the former the revenues for his life, together with the right of 
regressus, that is, of resuming the abbacy in the event of Philp 
dying or resigning. The duke urges this course, as it had been 
the practice of abbots of Lindores to resign in their old age, and 
so the monastery had not suffered from incapable rulers (Epist. 
Regist. Scot. i. 330-332). 

A favourable return is made to the request on 24th July 1523. 
The revenues and regressus, together with the presentation to 
benefices, are reserved to Henry during his life. The revenues 
are recorded as 1000 florins; and the ' taxa' is 333 florins (Brady, 
Episcopal Succession, i. 197). 

20. On 6th June 1516, it was passed under the Great Seal that 
a lapse of patronage to a chaplainry at the altar of SS. John the 
Baptist and John the Evangelist in the new aisle of Largo Church 
should go first to the provost and two great canons of St. Salvator's 
College, whom failing to the abbot and convent of Lindores (Reg. 
Mag. Sig. iii. 78). And in the same year Henry, the abbot, and 
the convent granted a tack of the lands of ' Benee and Catkin ' 
for nineteen years to Sir John Stirling of Keir (15th Sept. 1516) for 
c twolfe pundis wsuale monee of Scotland ; per an. (Stirlings of Keir, 
p. 309). In 1521 (23rd May) an agreement was made between 
abbot Henry and Gavin Dunbar, Bishop of Aberdeen, and sub- 
scribed by both parties at Aberdeen ' anent the debatable lands 
betwix Rothmais and Tulymorgond and the peit moss callit off 
Malyngsyd and Bonytoune of Rayne ' (Regist. Aberdon. i. 386). 
Compare ' Malind ' in Earl David's Great Charter, p. 3. 

Orme survived the appointment of his co-adjutor for more than 
four years, at least ; for we find ' Henry, abbot of Lindores,' 
present and assenting to the judgment upon Patrick Hamilton, 
' abbot or pensionary of Feme,' on the last day of February 



1 He is unable to rest satisfied ' nisi eundem religionis locum a secularium 
Curialium aucupatu securiorem reddat.' 



312 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

1527-8. John Philp, or Philips (he appears as e Joannes Philippi/ 
in the papal deed of provision), is found granting to Sir John 
Stirling of Keir a renewal of the tack of the lands of ' Beny and 
Caitkin,' with the teind-sheaves of the same,, and appointing him 
the bailie of the abbey for the lands of Estir and Wester Feddallis, 
on 5th October 1532 (The Stirlings of Keir, pp. 346-34-9), and 
making a grant to another of the fee-ferme of abbey lands in 
Mernes, on l6th March 1537 (see the confirmation in Reg. Mag. Sig. 
iii. 2636). Certain lands, multures, etc., in the neighbourhood of 
the abbey were confirmed to Patrick Balfour, heir of John Balfour, 
of Dene-myle, in 1541 (29th Sept., ibid. 2460). While a little 
earlier we have the confirmation of the lease of lands in the 
neighbourhood of Dundee to David Wedderburne, burgess of that 
town (ibid. 1913 ; confirmation, 10th Feb. 1538). John (v.) Philp, 
abbot of Lindores, was one of the large assemblage of ecclesiastics 
at St. Andrews, who on 28th May 1540, condemned Sir John 
Borthwick for heresy. He appears frequently in Parliament, and 
was one of the Lords of the Articles in 1544. 

The tack of lands granted to Sir J. Stirling (referred to above) 
is subscribed by the whole chapter of the monastery ; and from it 
we learn that the monks numbered at this time twenty-five beside 
the abbot. 

During the tenure of office by Philp, the wave of popular 
feeling hostile to the Church was rising and gaining volume. It 
is remarkable that Lindores was the first of the ancient abbeys 
of Scotland to suffer from the violence of the mob. In the 
autumn of 1543 the populace of Dundee rose, and, after destroy- 
ing the houses of the Black and Grey Friars in that town, made 
their way to Lindores, sacked the monastery, and turned out the 
monks. The immediate cause of this outburst is very obscure ; 
but the selection of Lindores rather than the somewhat nearer 
monastery of Balmerino for the display of the popular animosity, 
may perhaps be accounted for by differences between the abbey 
and the burgesses with respect to their parish church of St. 
Mary. 

21. The monks probably soon resumed life in their old home. 
It was a common saying among men of the reforming party that 
'the rooks would return unless the rookery was pulled down/ 
At any rate the monks were in possession when in June 1559 the 
forces of the Congregation, fired by the invective of John Knox 



APPENDIX IV 313 

preaching at St. Andrews, marched upon Lindores. Knox, writing 
a few days later than the scene he describes, says, ( The abbey of 
Lindores, a place distant from St. Andrews twelve myles, we 
reformed; their altars overthrew we; their idols, vestments of 
idolatrie, and mass-books we burnt in their presence, and com- 
manded them to cast away their monkish habits.' 

On 24th February 1566, Pope Pius v. granted the petition of 
f John, abbot of the monastery of Lindores,' resigning in favour 
of ' John Leslie, clerk of the diocese of Moray, a Doctor of both 
Laws, one of the Council in Scotland.' This was the well-known 
John Leslie, afterwards (22nd April 1575) provided to the see of 
Ross, with a dispensation super defectu natalium (Brady, Episcopal 
Succession, i. 147). 

The documents from the charter-chests of Leslie of Balquhain, 
communicated to Bishop Keith by the antiquary Macfarlane, and 
printed by the bishop in his Catalogue (pp. 198-200, Russel's 
edition), sufficiently explain the need of the dispensation referred 
to, and show that Knox, if he was coarse and offensive in his 
language, was not incorrect in styling Leslie 'preastis gett' (Works, 
i. 236). 

22. We know little of Leslie's administration of the abbey. 
Mr. David Laing shows that in June 1557 he obtained a royal man- 
date, and took an active part in regard to the confirmation of 
various feu-farms of lands pertaining to the abbey of Lindores 
( Works of John Knox, ii. 60 1 ). Mr. Alexander Laing adds that John 
Leslie of New Leslie, son of Andrew Leslie and Janet Leslie 
(natural) daughter of the bishop, was served heir to his father in 
certain lands in Aberdeenshire which formerly were the property 
of the abbey of Lindores (Abbey of Lindores, p. 129). 

According to Macfarlane (Genealogical Collections, ii. 4), John 
Leslie left three daughters, whose marriages he records. 

Leslie was the last ecclesiastic of the old faith who held the 
dignity of abbot of Lindores, and with him this sketch appropri- 
ately closes. 



314 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



APPENDIX V 

THE LEGAL AUTHORITIES CITED IN THE ' OPINIONS/ 

CXLIX., CL. 
1. 

P. 203, 1. 5. ' nota Hostien. in summa, de feu. c ultimo v. set 
numquid tenebitur/ 

The reference is to the Summa Aurea of Henry de Bartholomaeis, 
or (from his birthplace) de Suze (Henricus de Segusio), Cardinal 
(1261 or 1262) of Ostia (Hostiensis). He died at Lyons, 6th 
November 1271. 

The passage referred to above is in liber iii. of the Summa, 
rubric De Feudis, the last chapter, the verse beginning, ' sed nun- 
quid tenebitur' (edit. Lugduni, 1548, folio 155, verso}. 

P. 203,1. 14. <nam in li. feu orum ti. si de feu. defunct.f fuerit 
c. si quis coll. x. dicitur si quis/ etc. 

Through an error in transcription the words ' militis contentio ' 
(which appear in a contracted form in the Lindores MS.) have been 
omitted from the Latin text, the discovery being made too late to 
allow of doing more than inserting a daggerf, which it is hoped 
will call attention to this correction. The reference is to Consue- 
tudines Feudorum, lib. ii. tit. xxvj . 4, where we find (almost verbatim} 
the words of the MS. 
P. 203, 1. 18. ' Si enim prescriptus f 

The text here has been read with difficulty, and there is much 
doubt whether it is rightly represented in the print. At any 
rate it is obviously corrupt. 

P. 203, 1. 19. ' C. de episcopis et cleris li. 1.' 

I have not identified this reference. Perhaps it is to the Codex 
of Justinian, lib. i. tit. iii., ' De episcopis et clericis/ etc. The 
passage of this title that seems most clearly to illustrate the text 
is the last section of cap. 38, taken from the Novels (Collat. ix. 
tit. vi. cap. 17). 

P. 203, 1. 20. ' in libro feudorum de feu. dato/ etc. 

Consuetudlnes Feudorum, lib. i. tit. xxvij., 'De Feudo dato in 
vicem legis commissoriae reprobando.' The chapter ' Quidam 



APPENDIX V 315 

obligaverat ' (' obligavit/ Lindores MS.) according to the arrange- 
ment of modern printed books appears under tit. xxviij. As 
quoted here it seems to have been a chapter of tit. xxvij. 

P. 203, 1. 23. ' de privilegiis c. cum olim, per/ 

This is Decretals, lib. v. tit. xxxiij. (De Privilegiis et excessibus) 
c. 14 (cum olim). The section designated by ' per' is that which 
begins in the best printed editions with ' super hoc autem,' but 
which, as noted by Pithaeus, was read in some texts ' per hoc autem/ 

P. 203, 1. 23. ' C. ex ore fi/ is c. 17 (Ex ore sedentis). 

Of the same book and title at the end. 

The argument proceeds that there is nothing to the contrary 
to be derived from 

' C. de prescrip/ Decretals, lib. ii. tit. xxvi. (De praescriptionibus), 
or Codex, lib. vii. tit. xxxiij. (De praescriptione, etc.). I must 
leave to others to trace ' contra libertatem/ etc. 

P. 203, 1. 25. < ff. de alienacione, iu[dic]ii, m[utan]di, c[aus]a, 

facta, 1. iij. I/ 

Pandects, lib. iv. tit. vij. c. 3 1. Here occur the words f quia 
Praetores faveant libertatibus/ The Lindores MS. suggests a 
variant, ' fovent/ 

P. 204, 1. 1. ' in libro feu. quantum fiat investitura, c. nulla.' 

This is Consuetudines Feudorum, lib. ii. tit. iij. of which the 
rubric in the printed texts is < Perquos fiat investitura/ etc. At 
its close we have the exactly pertinent passage ' Nulla autem 
investitura debet ei fieri, qui fidelitatem facere recusat, cum a 
fidelitate feudum dicitur vel a fide : nisi eo pacto acquisitum sit 
ei feudum, id sine juramentojldelitatis habeatur.' 

P. 204, 1. 5. < Hostieri/ 

The passage is to a large extent illegible. 

P. 204, 1. 12. ' Azo/ Portius Azo (or Azzolinus) died 1200. 

He taught law at Bologna, where the school of law could not 
contain the crowds that flocked from all quarters to his lectures. 
His works stand in the first rank of the mediaeval jurists. His 
best known works are the Summa Codicis and Summa Institutionum. 
His reputation lasted long. There are said to have been as many 
as thirty editions of his Summa printed between 1482 and 1610. 

P. 204, 1. 15. ' per fredericum c. imperialem, . Preterea ducatus/ 
The reference is to Constitutiones Feudorum, lib. ii. tit. Iv. (De 



316 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

prohibita feudi alienatione per Fridericum), which begins with the 
words, ( Imperialem decet solertiam.' 

The section referred to begins, ' Praeterea ducatus, marchia, 
comitatus,' etc. 

P. 204, 1. 16. <t3 pe. de bel. per.' 

I offer as a conjectural expansion of the above ' tenet Petrus 
de Bella Pertica.' Pierre de Belle-Perche was a distinguished 
teacher of civil law at Orleans, and was afterwards Bishop of 
Auxerre and Chancellor of France. He died in 1307. A treatise 
of his (De Feudis) is printed in the great collection of Zilletus 
(x. ii. 2). A pertinent passage will be found under tit. viii. 
27, 28. 
Line 17. 'ff. de adop. 1. ij.' 

That is Pandects, lib. i. tit. vij. (De adoptionibus) ; ( 1. ij ' seems 
to correspond to the second section of the printed editions, where 
the law is laid down that he who is about to be adopted must 
give his consent. 

P. 204, 1. 17. ' Hostiensis de ma. et obe. dilecti.' 

That is, the comment of Hostiensis on Decretals, lib. i. tit. 
xxxjv. (De majoritate et obedientid), c. 13 ( Dilecti JUit). Though in 
Summa Aurea he has a chapter De majoritate et obedientia (fol. 57, 
edit. Lugduni, 1548), the reference seems to be to his Expositio in 
Sex Libros Decretalium, a work much esteemed, of which editions 
in print are said to have appeared in Rome in 1470 and 1473, in 
folio, and at Venice, 1478, in folio; but the editor has not had an 
opportunity of seeing this book. 

P. 204, line 18. 'et in summa de feu. ult. vers. set nequit.' 

This reference is to the Summa Aurea of Hostiensis, the last 
chapter of De Feudis. The verse f sed nunquid ' seems to be 
intended ; ' nunquid ' having been here misread by the scribe for 
' nequit.' There is no verse in this chapter beginning ( sed 
nequit.' 
P. 204, 1. 19- 'et spe. ti. de feu., 1. vers. xxix.' 

' Spe. ' is a recognised abbreviation in mediaeval law books for 
' speculum,' ' speculator.' 1 

The reference is to the Speculum Judiciale of Durandus (1230- 
1396), known as Speculator, who had taught at Bologna and 
Mantua, and was made bishop of Mende (1286). It was a book 



1 See Cappelli's Lexicon Abbreviaturaruni. 



APPENDIX V 317 

of great repute among the mediaeval jurists. In the inventory of 
the Glasgow Cathedral library, made in 1432,, it is noted that 
Master Alexander Lawedre had been lent a Speculum Judiciale, 
having deposited as a pledge a copy of the Decreturn ; the book 
was to be returned at the will of the chapter of the cathedral 
(Regist. Glasguen. ii. 336). 1 There was another copy of the 
Speculum Judiciale (in pulchro volumine) in the Glasgow Library 
(ibid. p. 338). In the inventory (1436) of the Library of Aber- 
deen Cathedral (which was much richer in books on canon and civil 
law than Glasgow), we find three copies of the Speculum Judiciale 
(Regist. Aberdoti.ii. 129, 130). 

P. 204, 1. 23. 'de privilegiis ex parte abbatisse juxta ver. clerum 

et populum/ 

Decretals, lib. v. tit. xxxiij. (De Privilegiis') c. 13. (Ex parte 
Abbatissae) near the words ' clerum et populum.' 

P. 204, 1. 25. ' xij. q. 1 duo/ 

Decreturn, pars, ii., causa xii., quaestio i. cap. 7 (Duo sunt genera 
Christianorurri). The two kind of Christians are the clergy and the 
laity (or populus). 

P. 204, 1. 25. < xcvj. di. duo/ 

Decretum, pars, i., distinctio xcvj. c. 7 (Duo sunt quippe Imperator 
Auguste, etc.). 

P. 204, 1. 25. 'xix. q. 1. duo/ 

Decretum, pars ii., causa xjx., quaestio i. [this should be ii.] 
cap. 2 (Duae sunt leges). Under quaestio i. there is no chapter 
beginning with due; but a glance at the page will show how 
easily the eye might have run on to the next quaestio. 

P. 204, 1. 25. ' de ma. et obe. solite/ 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxiij. (De Majoritate et Obedientia) cap. 6 
(Solitae benignitates affectu). The drift of the four preceding refer- 
ences is to show the distinction between laity and clergy ; this 
reference goes further and contends that the Imperium is not 
superior to the Sacerdotium, but is subject to it, and is bound to 
render obedience to it. 



1 If this Alexander Lauder was the same as the person appointed Bishop of 
Dunkeld in 1440, he was brother of William Lauder, Bishop of Glasgow (1408- 
1425), and appears to have been a student of law, for we find that the bishop 
had given a Braco to the Cathedral Library with the reservation, apparently, 
that it should be in the hands of Master Alexander Lauder pro vita. Regist. 
Glasguen. ii. 336. 



318 THE CHARTULARY OF LTNDORES 

P. 204, 1. 27. ' c. si sentencia interdict! de sen. ex li. vj.' 

Liber Sextus Decretalium,lib. v. tit. xi. cap. 16 (Si sententia inter- 
dicti). It is here laid down that if a sentence of interdict is 
pronounced against the clergy, it is not to be understood (unless 
otherwise expressed) that the sentence applies to the people. 
Having established to his own satisfaction that the clergy and 
people are different, the jurist proceeds to show that clergy and 
monks are different. 

P. 204, 1. 29. ' ne cle. et mo. in R cis xvj. q. 1 legi/ 

There are here two places referred to. But, owing to the un- 
certainty as to whether ' in R cis ' (= in Rubricis) refers to the 
first or the second, they are here exhibited as they stand in the 
text. f ne cle. et mo.' is Decretals, lib. iii. tit. 1, of which the 
rubric is ' Ne clerici vel Monachi secularibus negotiis se immis- 
ceant/ and almost certainly it is this rubric that is referred to. It 
proves the point which our jurist is labouring to establish, that 
clergy and monks are distinct. 
P. 204., 1. 29. < xvj. q. 1. legi/ 

Decretum, pars ii., causa xvj., quaestio 1., c. 36 {Legi epistolani). 
The rubric of this is also pertinent : ' Ad clericatus militiam non 
eligantur desertores Monasteriorum/ The text of the chapter is 
also pertinent. 
P. 204-, 1. 33. ' de sen. ex. inter alia/ 

Decretals, lib. v. tit. xxxjx. (De sententia excommunicationis (cap. 
31 (inter alia). In this chapter we find the words 'unde jus 
prodiit, interpretatio quoque procedat/ 

P. 204, 1. 34. f de judi. cum venissent/ 

Decretals, lib. ii. tit. i. (De Judiciis), cap. 12 (Cum venissent}. 
The pertinent words are f Cum super privilegiis Sedis Apostolicae 
causa vertatur, noluimus de ipsis per alios judicari/ 

P. 204, 1. 35. ' per b et alios suggestum de Dec/ 

The letter printed f b' is by no means distinct in the MS. It 
may perhaps be read ' V ' (with a mark of contraction). What 
commentator on the Canon Law is referred to must be left to 
conjecture. 

' Suggestum de Dec/ is Decretals, lib. iii. tit. xxx. (De decimis, 
primitiis, et oblationibus} cap. 9 (suggestum est ex parte vestra). The 
point is that as, in a particular case referred to, the Roman Churcli 
had granted a privilege with respect to tithes, the Roman Church 
now interpreted how far that privilege extended. 



APPENDIX V 319 

P. 05, 1. 3. e Habet vim siue f quia facia,' etc. 

It has been suggested that the word read here as ' siue ' should 
be read ' snie ' ( = sentencie), but the testimony of the script does 
not appear to yield this reading. 

P. 205, 1. 4. < c. fi. de rescrip. li. vj. J 

Liber Sextus Decretalium, lib. i. tit. iii. (De Rescriptis) last chapter. 

P. 205, 1. 9- ' c. fami. hercisde v. films/ 

Codex Justin., lib. iii. tit. xxxvj. (Familiae \K\erciscundae). There 
is no chapter in the printed text of the Codex beginning with 
' films ' ; but ' c. 16 Filii ' is doubtless the passage referred to. It 
runs ' Filii patris testamentum rescindendi, si hoc inomciosum 
probare non possunt, nullam habent facultatem/ 

P. 205, 1. 13. ( nota Ho. c. dilecti de doncs.' 

This reference I take to be Hostiensis on Decretals, lib. iii. 
tit. xxiv. (De donationibus). There is no chapter beginning with 
the word ' dilecti ' in the printed texts ; but cap. 6 (Cum dilecti) is 
perhaps intended. 

P. 205, 1. 22. ' C. cum olim de sensi.' 

Decretals, lib. iii. tit. xxxix. (De censibus), cap. 19 (Cum olini). 

P. 205, 1. 24. < C. iiij. q. iij. si quis testibus.' 

Decretum, pars ii. causa iv. quaestio iii. 42 (si quis testibus usus 
Juerif). The point is that if any one makes use of witnesses, and 
these witnesses are produced against him in another suit, it will 
not be lawful for him to take exception to them, unless he can 
prove that they had become hostile to him since he employed 
them as witnesses on his behalf. This is quite in accord with the 
preceding sentence in our Chartulary : ' Quia quod aliquis approbat 
pro se tenetur recipere contra se.' 

P. 205, 1. 26. ' Ho. in summa i., alio modo,' etc. 

Hostiensis, Summa Aurea, lib. iii. cap. De jure patronatus, 1., 
where we read (under the heading Quid ait ius patronatus} e Dicitur 
et alio modo ius patronatus quod acquiritur ex manumissione 
proprii servi ut ff. de iure pa. l.j. et per totum.' 

The reference to the Pandects (in line 27), it will thus be seen, 
is second hand from Hostiensis. The passage referred to is 
Pandects, lib. xxxvij. tit. xjv. De jure patronatus. 

P. 205, 1. 30. ff. de he. insti. 1. quociens, hered.' 
Pandects, lib. xxviii. tit. v. (De heredibus instituendis}. 



THE CHARTCJLARY OF LINDORES 

P. .205; 1. 32. ' ff. de contra, ep. 1. dolia, fi.' 

Pandects, lib. xviii. tit. i. (De contrahenda emptione), cap. 76 
(Dolia in horreis defossd) the last section. The point is the support 
given by prescription of long possession in a legal defence. 

P. 205,, 1. 32. ' Nota et Dynus in r a juris si quis in jus succedit et 

ibi notatis.' 

Dinus (or Dynus) de Rossonibus, surnamed Mugellanus, from his 
birthplace, Mugello, near Florence, taught law at Bologna, and 
acquired a great reputation. He died in 1303. Among his 
writings (the titles of which may be found in Cave's Scriptorum 
ecclesiasticorum Historia Literaria, torn. ii. ; . Wharton's Appendix, 
p. 8, edit. Basileae, 1 744-5) l is Commentarius in Regulas Juris 
Pontificii ; and it is presumably to this work (despite the fact that 
the contraction ' r a ' must be extended as ' regula ') that the 
reference is made. In the inventory of the library of the Cathedral 
of Aberdeen (1436) among the books on canon law we find 
what appears in the Spalding Club edition of the Registrum Aber- 
donense (ii. 129), 'Dignus de regulis iuris.' One cannot but 
suspect that ' Dignus ' here is an error of transcription for 
( Dynus.' 

P. 205, 1. 37. f ff. de do. ma. et metus excep. 1. apud celsum, 

de a[u]ctoris.' 

Pandects, lib. xliv. tit. iv. (De doli mali, et metus exceptione\ cap. 
4 (Apud Celsum), 27 (De auctorisdolo exceptio emptori non objicitur). 
' Auctor,' in the language of the jurists, was the ' seller' or 
' vender.' 

P. 205, 1. 39. ' In 1. quociens, C. de hered. insti.' 

Codex Justin., lib. vi. tit. xxjv. (De heredibus instituendis), cap. 13. 
(Quoiies). 

P. 206, 1. 18. ' ff. de accio. et obli. v. quecunque.' 

Pandects, lib. xliv. tit. vij. (De obligationibus et actionibus) cap. 11 
(Quaecunque gerimus). 

P. 206, 1. 19. 'ff. de furtis v. inter omnes.' 

Pandects, lib. xlvii. tit. ii. (Defurtis), cap. 46 (Inter omnes constat). 

P. 206, 1. 31. ' in c. cum olim. ij., fi. de priuilegiis. 

Decretals, lib. v. tit. xxxiij. (De Privilegiis), cap. xiv. (cum olim 
propter quaestiones} the final section. The numeral ' ij ' after 

1 Wharton's list is capable of being considerably enlarged by reference to the 
catalogues of the great libraries. 



APPENDIX V 

' cum olim ' means (as I understand it) the second of the two 
chapters of this title which begins with cum olim (for cap. xij. 
begins with ' cum olim essemus '). 

P. 206, 1. 31. ' Spe. ti. ti. de actore, versus Item illustris pa. et in 

ti. de reo vs. Item consul/ etc. 

The reference is presumably to the Speculum of Durandus, 
which the editor has not had an opportunity of consulting. 

P. 206,, 1. 37. ' ff. de aqua plu. ar. 1. si tertius, si quis prius.' 

Pandects, lib. xxxix. tit iij. (De aqua, et aquae pluviae arcendae) 
cap. 6 (si tertttui), 4 (si quis, prius quant). 

P. 206, 1. 38. 'in c. ex literis de pig.' 

Decretals, lib. iii. tit. xxj. (De pignoribus et aliis cautionibus), cap. 
5 (ex literis}. The pertinent passage seems to be ' bona . . . cum 
suo onere transierint ad quemlibet possidentem.' 

P. 206, 1. 39. ' et de decs, cum non sit.' 

Decretals, lib. iii. tit. xxx. (De decimis), cap. 33 (cum non sit in 
homine). The pertinent words seem to be ' quoniam res cum onere 
suo transit.' 

P. 207, 1. 6. f ly vt.' 

Dr. Maitland Thomson has pointed out to me that this passage 
is a discussion of the sense in which the word ' ut ' is to be under- 
stood in the preceding phrase, ' processu trium dierum stante ut 
valido.' The word ' ly,' ' lie/ ' le,' is familiar in mediaeval Latin 
before vernacular words introduced into the text, as in modern 
English we might use inverted commas or italics when using a 
foreign word. It is the old French definite article with a somewhat 
more demonstrative sense than now attaches to e le.' The inquiry 
is into the meaning of the ut, that is, the word ( ut,' in the phrase 
cited above, and counsel's opinion labours to show that the expres- 
sion must not be assumed to imply that the proceedings taken 
against the abbot by Earl Douglas were acknowledged by the 
former to be really valid. This contention of his he attempts to 
support by showing that the word 'tanquam' was sometimes used 
in phrases where there was a certain resemblance between things 
which did not in truth belong to the same class. 

P. 207, 1. 8. f xxvij. q. i. quotquot : notatur in c. nuper de biga.' 
Decretum, pars. ii. causa xxvii. quaestio i. c. 24 (Quotquot). 
This canon is referred to in the notes to Decretals, lib. i. tit. 

xxj. (De bigamis non ordinandis), c. 4 (Nuper a nobis). Innocent 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

in. in the text is discussing the case of one who on his wife's 
death is advanced to holy orders, and then marries again, or 
(to be more accurate), ' cum secunda de facto contraxit et cog- 
novit.' His answer is that clerks, who, so far as in them lay, 
joined themselves in matrimony with second wives, were not to 
be dispensed ' tanquam cum Bigamis ' . . . ' licet in veritate 
Bigami non existant.' To the word ' tanquam' the note is 
added, ' Hoc tanquam non est expressivum veritatis, sed similitu- 
dinarium, juxta illud : existis tamquam ad latronem,' etc. For 
readers who are not familiar with the Vulgate, I may add that 
the last four words are from St. Matthew, xxvi. 55, and form a 
good illustration of this use of tamquam. % 

The Lindores MS. undoubtedly reads ' veritas expressivum,' but 
* veritas ' must be a slip of the pen for ' veritatis,' as in the 
note to the passage in the Decretals. 

II. 

NOTES ON THE LEGAL AUTHORITIES IN ' CASUS ' (No. CL.) 

P. 212, 1. 19 and elsewhere. ' de A. de B.' 

In the diocese of Aberdeen were the parishes of the Garioch ; 
and in the diocese of Brechin, St. Mary's, Dundee. 

P. 212, 1. 2 from foot. < Videtur quod sic.' 

It was a common manner of treating questions, theological as 
well as legal, to first exhibit at length the various arguments in 
favour of the view which the writer finally rejects. This system 
of treatment prevails throughout the Summa Theologica of Thomas 
Aquinas; and instances could be cited of careless and unwary 
writers alleging the arguments, afterwards replied to, as those of 
the author. 

P. 212, 1. 2 from foot. < C. conquerente de off. Ord.' 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxj (De officio Judicis Ordinarii), cap. 1 6 (Con- 
querente oeconomo monasterii). By the rescript which is embodied 
in this chapter Honorius in. confirms to the bishop of a diocese in 
which a monastery is situated his rights to obedience, subjection, 
reverence, ' institution and destitution,' correction and reforma- 
tion, and jurisdiction over all the churches and chapels within his 
diocese which pertain to the monastery ; also ' synodum/ or the 
right to require attendance from these churches at his synod, and 
two shillings annually 'in nomine synodatici seu cathedratici.' This 



APPENDIX V 323 

is subsequently answered very easily by showing that it had refer- 
ence only to churches and chapels within the diocese in which the 
monastery was situated. 

P. 212, 1. 2 from foot. ' C. quod super hiis. de ma. et ob.' 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxiij (De majoritate et obedientid), cap 9- 
(Quod super his). 

Here it is enjoined that abbots and priests subject to a bishop 
by diocesan law, who refuse to come to his synod, should be com- 
pelled by ecclesiastical censure to attend the synod and render 
due obedience. This, again, does not touch the case, for it refers 
only to abbots and priests who were subject to the bishop ' dio- 
cesana lege,' that is, who were subject to him as within his 
diocese. 

L. 212, last line. ' xviij. q. ii. c. Abbates.' 

Decretum, pars ii. causa xviii. ; questio ii. c. 16 (Abbates pro 
humilitate). In this it is enjoined that abbots should once a year 
assemble at the place which the bishop might choose. This canon 
is no more pertinent than the two preceding passages from the 
canon law. 

P. 213, 1. 10. ' c. nullus, de jurejurando.' 

Decretals, lib. ii. tit. xxjv {De jurejurando), cap. 5 (Nullus)^ 
This declares that no bishop can compel clerks to swear to him 
except those to whom some administration of things ecclesiastical 
has been committed. 

P. 213, 1. 10. ' xxiij. di. c. quamquam.' 

Decretum, pars i. distinctio xxiij. c. 6 (Quamquam omnes). 

P. 213, 1. 11. ' xxii. qu. ultima, ultimo.' 

Decretum, pars ii. causa xxii. questio v. (the last Quaestio of 
this Causa), 23 (the last section of the last Quaestio). It runs, in 
almost precisely the language which was repeated by Gregory ix. 
in the Decretals, lib. ii. tit. xxjv. cap. 5, already referred to, as 
follows : ' Nullus Episcopus Clericos suos, nisi forte quibus Ecclesi- 
asticarum rerum dispensatio commissa fuerit, sibi jurare compellat.' 

P. 213, 1. 14, ' xviij. q. ultima canonicam.' 

Decretum, pars ii. causa xviii. quaestio ii. (the last). The 
word ' canonicam ' seems to be an error of the scribe for ' canonica/ 
the first word .of the comment of Gratian appended to the final 
section. 

The reference immediately preceding is repeated. 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

P. 213, 1. 17. 'xviij di. c. Episcopus/ etc. 

Decretum, pars i. distinctio xviij. c. ii. (Epigcopus). This is a 
Palea (or addition to the original compilation of Gratian). It 
runs, ' Episcopus non debet abbatem cogere ad synoduin ire, nisi 
aliqua rationabilis causa existat.' 
P. 213, 1. 17, ' ex ore sedentis de privilegio in fiV 

Decretals, lib. v. tit. xxxiij (De privilegiis), cap. 17 (ex ore 
sedentis}, at the end of the chapter. This is from a letter of Inno- 
cent in. (written about 1213) to the abbot and monks of Evesham 
as to a dispute between them and the Bishop of Worcester. The 
abbot desired to establish that he was exempt from attendance at 
the bishop's synod, and for this purpose had shown that he was 
entitled to have the first place after the Bishop of Worcester. 
The Pope argues that the abbot on his own showing was bound 
to attend the episcopal (i.e. diocesan) synod, because it would be 
absurd that lie should rank next the Bishop of Worcester at 
general or provincial synods. But though the abbot and monas- 
tery was exempt from episcopal jurisdiction, the abbot was bound 
to show 'reverentiam et obsequium ' to the bishop for the ' mem- 
bers ' not exempt, by which was meant probably those who had 
cure of souls in parish churches belonging to t lie monastery. 
P. 213, 1. 18. ' c. dilectus de off. ord. glo. ii. circa medium/ 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxj. (De officio Judicis Ordinarii), cap. 18. 
(Dilectus), glos. ii. 
P. 213, 1. 21. ( c. quod super hiis de ma. et ob.' 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxiij. (De majoritate et obedientia), c. 9 
(Quod super his). 
P. 213, 1. 21. ' xviij. q. ii. Abbates.' 

Decretum, pars ii. causa xvii. quaestio ii. c. 16 (Abbates). 

P. 213, 1 24. < de ilia regula juris Ii. vj. odia, etc.' 

Sext : lib. v. Appended at the end of the book will be found 
' De Regulis Juris.' Of these Regula xv. runs thus : ' Odia re- 
stringi et favores convenit ampliari.' 
P. 213. 1. 35. 'c. dilectus, de off. ord. cum suis notatis.' 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxj. (De officio Judicis Ordinarii), cap. 18 
(Dilectus). The summary of this chapter as given in the Corpus 
Juris Canonici, as edited by J. and F. Pithou (Pithoeus), Parisiis,. 
1687, gives the sense sufficiently: 'Lex dicecesana et lex jurisdic- 
tionis sunt diversae : unde res judicata in una non obstat agenti in 
alia.' 



APPENDIX V 325 

P. 214, 1. 10. ' c. suscepti re. de preb. li. vj.' 

Sext : lib. iii. tit. iii. ( De prcebendis et dignifatibtts), cap. i. (Suscepti 
regiminis). 

The point of this reference is to establish that there is good 
authority for regarding the clergy presented by the monastery to 
benefices as rectors and not as vicars. The pertinent passage runs 
as follows : ' Verurn (sicut nobis querela multorum frequens in- 
sinuat) Religiosi exempt! de proventibus Paroecialium Ecclesiarum, 
in quibus jus obtinent patronatus, sen Rectorum presentatio per- 
tinet ad eosdem, tantum percipiunt annuatim quod Rectores 
Ecclesiarum ipsarum non possunt de residue commode sustentare, 
et Episcopalia jura persolvere, ac alia incumbentia eis onera. 
supportare,' etc. 

P. 214, 1. 21. 'c. conquerente de off. ord.' 

Decretals, lib. i. tit. xxxj. (De officio Judicis Ordinarii), c. 16 
(conquerente (Economo). The pertinent part is ' Tu autein his 
juribus in prsefatis Ecclesiis contentus existens, non amplius ab 
eis exigas prseter moderatum auxilium, quod juxta formam Lateran. 
Concilii, si manifesta et rationabilis causa extiterit, cum charitate 
postulandum, sicut ab aliis Ecclesiis ejusdem direcesis, pro necessi- 
tate temporis, sustinemus.' 



APPENDIX VI 

LE LlURE DES TROIS FILZ DE ROYS, ETC. 

Mr. Archibald Constable, in the notes to his translation of John 
Major's Historia Majojis Britannia? (Scottish History Society, vol. x. 
p. 165), writes, 'Brunet (ed. 1862, vol. iii. col. 1126, s.a. Livre) 
quotes five editions of this work in French, of which the first four 
were printed at Lyons in 1501, 1503, 1504, 1508 and the fifth 
at Paris, undated, but about 1530. The National Library of Paris 
possesses six MSS. of the work ; and a MS. catalogue of MSS. in the 
same library attributes the work to Charles Aubert, who wrote 
also a Histoire d' Olivier de Castille. There seems to be no trace 
of the edition " in nostra lingua vernacula," except in Major, and it 
is possibly one of the many books now lost that were printed by 
Walter Chapman in the early years of the sixteenth century.' 

That the work is a mere romance will be sufficiently established 



326 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

by merely transcribing the full title (as given by Brunet) of the 
Lyons edition, printed by Claude Nourry in 1503. It runs : 
' Le liure de trois filz de roys : cest assavoir De f ranee, dagleterre 
et descosse, lesqlz en leurieunesse pour la foy crestienne soustenir 
au seruice du Roy de secille eurent de glorieuses victoires centre 
les turz, lequel roy de secille apres pour ses victoires et vaillances 
fut des electeurs de lempire esleu empereur, et espousa le filz du 
roy de france alors roy la belle Yolente fille de lempereur par 
quoy succeda au royaulme de Secille et en jouyst paisiblement, et 
le filz du roy dagleterre espousa la fille du turc apres quelle fut 
crestienne, et le filz du roy descosse alors roy print a femme la 
seur du diet roy dagleterre, et le filz du turc alors turc lautre 
seur, seur du roy dagleterre.' 

Mr. A. Francis Steuart has been so good as to supply the 
editor with notes on the contents of the book. From these it is 
evident that there are some points of resemblance between the 
romance and the story as told by Boece. The name of the 
Scottish hero is David ; he suffers shipwreck ; he is taken captive 
by the Turks. But, on the whole, the differences are so numer- 
ous, that it is certain that either Boece had some other source for 
his story, or else that he indulged largely in the faculty for inven- 
tion, with which he is, only too justly, credited. 

No English translation is known to exist in print. But in the 
British Museum (MSS. Hurley, 326) there is a MS. on vellum,, 
assigned to about A.D. 1 500, containing an English translation. The 
contents will be found described in Mr. H. L. D. Ward's Catalogue 
of Romances in the department of Manuscripts in the British Museum 
(vol. i. pp. 782, 783). 'The three princes are Philip of France,. 
Humphrey of England, and David of Scotland. Philip leaves 
his father [King Charles] secretly and serves against the Grand 
Turk under Ferant, the seneschal of the King of Sicily. Philip 
calls himself " Le Despureu," but the Princess lolante of Sicily 
gives him the title of " Le Surnome." The King of Sicily appeals 
for help, and French, English, and Scotch companies are sent to- 
him under David of Scotland. David is shipwrecked and cap- 
tured by the Turks ; but he escapes and serves under Ferant,, 
calling himself "Athis." Humphrey also joins the same service,, 
calling himself " Ector.'' The King of Sicily is elected Emperor 
of Germany. The Turks are defeated. A tournament is held 
for the hand of lolante ; and Philip, now become King of France,, 
is married to her.' ... It is also recounted that ' the grand Turk 



APPENDIX VII 327 

turned Christian, and married a sister of Humphrey, King of 
England ; but that after his death his people abjured the faith, 
and that he left no children by the English princess.' 

A French MS. of this romance was transcribed in 1463, by David 
Aubert, librarian of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy ; and 
indeed the authorship of the work has been by some assigned 
to him. See Mr. Ward's Catalogue as cited above. In addition 
to the early printed editions noticed by Brunet may be mentioned 
an issue in quarto from the press of ' Michel le Noir,' Paris, 1504-, 
and another from the press of ' La Veufe feu Jehan Trepparel,' 
Paris, which the British Museum Catalogue of Printed Books 
marks [' 1520'?]. Perhaps the latter may be the same as that 
assigned by Brunet to 'about 1530.' 



APPENDIX VII 

NOTES ON SEALS CONNECTED WITH 
LINDORES ABBEY. 

By WILLIAM RAE MACDONALD, F.S.A. Scot., Carrick Pursuivant. 

1. Seal of David, Earl of Huntingdon, younger brother of 

Malcolm iv. and William the Lion, who founded the Abbey 
of Lindores, circa A.D. 1191, and died 17th June 1219. 

The earl in armour on horseback to sinister with sword in his 
right hand, and shield on left arm charged with : Three piles (for 
Huntingdon). 

Legend : (Goth, caps.), SIGILL' DAVID COMITIS FRATRIS 
REGIS SCOCIE. Diameter, 2 r \ inches. 

Appended to Grant of a rent charge of 2s. 6d. to the Church of 
the Holy Trinity of London and Canons thereof, no date, but 
c. A.D. 1206-14. In Record Office. See Bain's Calendar of Docu- 
ments, vol. i. No. 60S ; Laing's Seals, vol. i. No. 443 ; Birch's 
Catalogue of Seals in British Museum, vol. iv. Nos. 15666-72. 

Also to charter granting the lands of Soutra to the monks of 
St. Mary of Soutra, without date. Charter and seal reproduced 
in Anderson's Diplomata Scotice, pi. xxxix. 

2. Seal of the Abbey of Lindores. 

The Virgin with open crown and nimbus, seated on a bench, 



328 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

holding in her right hand a lily, branch, or sceptre, and in her left 
the model of a church, while in her lap is seated the Child, front 
face with cruciform nimbus, His right hand raised in benediction, 
and His left holding an orb. 

Legend: (Goth, caps.), SIGILLVM SANTE MARIE ET SCI 
ANDREE DE LVNDORS. Pointed oval, 2ix lj| inches. 

Appended to Release by Thomas (who died 1273) abbot of 
Lindores and the convent to Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annan- 
dale, of all the second tithes of his land beyond Moneth, dated at 
Lundores, 7th August 1261. In Record Office, see Bain's Calendar 
of Documents, vol. i. No. 2267; Laing's Seals, vol. i. No. 1073; 
Birch's British Museum Seals, vol. iv. No. 15374; Raine's North 
Durham, Appendix, p. 88 ; Dugdale's Monasticon Anglicanum (1846 
edition), vol. vi. part ii. p. 1150. Engraved, incorrectly, on the 
title-page of Liber Sancte Marie de Lundoris, being the second 
part of The Chartularies of Balmerino and Lindores. Abbotsford 
Club, Edinburgh, 1841. 

An interesting description, with engraving, of a bone matrix 
of this seal is given by the Rev. John Brand, Secretary to the 
Society of Antiquaries of London, in a letter dated 10th May 
1797, printed in Archazologia, vol. xiii. p. 196, where he says, 
* This matrix represents the Virgin Wary seated with our Saviour 
in her lap holding a branch in her right hand, and the abbey of 
Lundores in her left, pi. xin., fig. 4. The inscription runs thus : 
" Sigillum Sancte Marie et Sci Andree de Lundo * * *" here a piece has 
been broken off; part of the R is however still visible, and there 
is no doubt but that the letters e and s followed it/ 

3. and 4. Seal of the Chapter of the Abbey. 

Obverse. Under a canopy of three gables is a figure of the 
Virgin crowned and seated on a bench holding on her left knee 
the Child with nimbus. On the dexter side is an abbot in profile 
in the act of kneeling holding in front of him his crosier, while 
issuing from his mouth is a scroll inscribed with the words, 
' AVE MARIA.' On the sinister side is a group of four monks 
chanting with a scroll in front of them inscribed with the 
commencement of the hymn, ' SALVE. SCA. PARENS.' Legend 
(Goth, caps.), S : CAPITULI : ECCL'IE : SCE : MARIE : ET : 
SANCTI : ANDREE : DE : LVNDORS. Diameter 2i* inches. 

Reverse. In the centre is a figure of St. Andrew extended on 
his cross. On the dexter side is a group of seven people listening 



APPENDIX VII 329 

to his teaching, while on the sinister side a man on a ladder is 
binding the arm of the Saint to the cross. Above his head is a 
trefoiled arch with six stars and a crescent enclosing a star, and 
beneath him is the half-length figure of a man in profile to sinister 
with his hands raised in adoration between a star and a crescent. 
Legend (Goth, caps.), BIDVO PENDENS IN CRVCE BEATVS 
ANDREAS DOCEBAT POPVLVM. Diameter 2^ inches. 

Appended to a charter by John [Philp] abbot of Lindores and 
the convent of the same to Patrick Leslie, son of Alexander 
Leslie of Wardes, of the lands of Flanders. Dated 20th March 
1554/5. Hutton's Sigilla, p. 82; Laing's Seals, vol. ii., Nos. 1160 
and 1159, pi. xm., figs. 5 and 4 ; Birch's British Museum Seals, vol. 
iv., No. 15,375, pi. vin., fig. 6, reverse only. 

Also to Charter by the abbot and monks of Lindores in favour 
of David Hathinton, their old quarrier, of a rood of land, dated 
20th August 1478. See Alexander Laing's Lindores Abbey, p. 185, 
where a woodcut of the obverse is given. 

Also to letters by John [Philp], abbot of the monastery of 
Lundoris and the convent of the same, met in chapter, to 
Master John Major, Professor of Sacred Letters, and Provost of 
the Collegiate Church of St. Salvator of St. Andrews, dated 
15th August 1547. In General Register House, Edinburgh. 

Also to Tack by John [Philp], abbot of Lundoris, and the 
convent of the same in favour of their servitor John Chalmer, son 
of the late John Chalmer, liferenter of Balbuthenne, dated 31st 
May 1549. In General Register House, Edinburgh. 

5. Seal of Thomas, abbot of Lindores, appointed 1291-1294, 
died c. 1306. 

The seal is divided into three parts. In the upper portion is 
represented a Gothic porch of three niches. In the centre niche 
is a figure of the Virgin crowned and seated, holding on her left 
arm the Child. In the niche on either side is an angel adoring. 
In the central portion under a triple arch is a figure of St. Andrew 
extended on his cross with four small figures binding his hands 
and feet to the same, a star on either side. In the lower portion 
under a pointed gable enclosing a trefoiled arch kneels an abbot 
to sinister holding a crosier between his extended hands. Legend 
(Goth, caps.), S' THOME ABBATIS D' LVNDORS. Pointed 
oval 2 X 1 T V inches. 

Now detached, but probably originally appended to homage, 



330 THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 

dated 28th August 1296, see Bain's Calendar of Documents, 
vol ii. p. 196, and Appendix iii., seal No. 138. Described 
in Laing's Seals, vol. i. No. 1074, where date given (c. A.D. 
1270) is certainly erroneous ; also in Birch's British Museum 
Seals, vol. iv., No. 15,377. A fairly accurate engraving of the 
seal is given in Liber Sancti Marie de Lundoris. Abbotsford Club, 
Edinburgh, 1841. 



6. Seal of James de Rossie, Abbot of Lindores, who was abbot 

from, at least, 1426 to, at least, 1445. 

Under a Gothic canopy of three arches is a full-length figure 
of the Virgin without nimbus or crown, holding the Child on her 
left arm, and in the niches on each side of her a lily or other 
flowering plant. Beneath in a round arched niche is the figure 
of a monk kneeling to dexter and looking up. On the sinister side 
of this niche is a shield bearing arms : A chevron between two 
escallops in chief and a trefoil slipped in base. Legend (Goth. I.e.), 
%> tacofot tie toggtt abbatfs tie luntwrig. Pointed oval 2 T 7 F x 1 T 8 
inches. 

Appended to charter by William of Cuninghame, vicar of Dun- 
donald, granting lands to the parish church of Irvine, dated at 
the monastery of Lundoris, 26th July 1426. See Muniments of 
the Royal Burgh of Irvine, printed for the Ayrshire and Galloway 
Archaeological Association, Edinburgh, 1890, vol. i. pp. 129-131, 
where a woodcut of the seal is given. 

7. Seal of John Leslie, Bishop of Ross, and Commendator of 

Lindores Abbey, appointed by the Pope, 24th February 1565/6. 

An ornamental shield bearing arms : On a bend three buckles, 
with initials I.L. at sides of the shield, and E.R. at top. 
Motto, on an escroll beneath shield, ' MEMENTO.' Legend (caps.), 
S IOANNIS E . ROSSEV . AC . COMMENDTARII DE . 
LN. Diameter l T 7 g- inches. 

' Mackenzie Charters A.D. 1567.' See Laing's Seals, vol. i. 
No. 934; Birch's British Museum Seals, vol. iv. No. 15096. 

Also appended to Charter by John Leslie, Bishop of Ross, and 
Commendator of Lindores in favour of Andrew Munro of Nigg, 
dated at Chanonry of Ross, 23rd December 1 566. Collection of 
charters presently in hands of the trustees of the late Sir William 
Fraser, K.C.B. 



APPENDIX VII 331 

8. A later seal of the same. 

An ornamental shield bearing arms : On a bend three buckles, 
with initials I.L. at sides of the shield, and at top E.R. with a 
buckle between them. Motto, on an escroll beneath shield, 
' MEMENTO.' Legend (caps.), S' IOHANNIS E ROSSEN . AC 
. COMENDATARII LVISDORS. Diameter llf inches. 

Appended to Charter by John [Leslie], Bishop of Ross, to Robert 
Leslie and Janet Elphinstone his spouse, of the lands of Ardersier, 
etc., in Nairn and Inverness, dated 9th June 1573. Cawdor 
Charters. See Laing's Seals, vol. ii. No. 1070; Birch's British 
Museum Seals, No. 1 5,097. 



9. Seal of Patrick, second son of Andrew, fourth Earl of Rothes, 
who was created Lord Lindores by Charter in 1600, and by 
Parliament in 1606. This seal is added though belonging 
to a time subsequent to the dissolution of the Abbey. 

A shield bearing arms : Quarterly. 1st and 4th. On a bend three 
buckles (Leslie). 2nd and 3rd. A lion rampant (intended for Aber- 
nethy). In chief over the first and second quarters a label of two 
points. Surtout, a tower embattled (for the title of Lindores). 
Crest, on a helmet with mantling and wreath, an angel head with 
wings expanded. Motto, beneath shield, 'STAT PROMISSA FIDES.' 
Supporters, two griffins segreant. Legend (caps.), S' PATRICII 
DOMINI DE LVNDORIS. Diameter 2 T V inches. 

Appended to Precept of Clare Constat in favour of Alexander 
Irvine of Drum, dated 8th July 1615. Communicated by Lord 
Lindsay. See Laing's Seals, vol. ii. No. 621 ; Birch's British Museum 
Seals, vol. iv. No. 1 6,481. 





(1) SEAL OF DAVID, EARL OF HUNTINGDON. 

(2) SEAL OF THE ABBEY OF LINDORES. 




(3) 




(3) OBVERSE, (4) REVERSE OF THE SEAL OF THE CHAPTER OF THE 
ABBEY OF LINDORES. 




(5) 




(5) SEAL OF THOMAS, ABBOT OF LINDORES. 

(6) SEAL OF JAMES DE ROSSIE, ABBOT OF LINDORES. 





(9) 



(7) SEAL OF JOHN LESLIE, BISHOP OF Ross AND COMMENDATOR 

OF LINDORES ABBEY. 

(8) A LATER SEAL OF BISHOP LESLIE. 

(9) SEAL OF PATRICK LESLIE, LORD LINDORES, 



INDEX 



ABBOTSLEIGH, li. 

Abdie (Ebedyn), xli, Hi, liii, Iviii, lix, 

68, 70. 

Thomas, chaplain of, 72. 

Aberbrothoc (Arbroath), xvi, xlv, j 

Ixxviii, 124, 126, 233, 273, 301. 

Adam, prior of, 59, 253. 

Gilbert, abbot of, 41, 248. 

Henry, abbot of, 8, 13-17, 129, 1 

165, 236, 238, 275. 

John, prior of, 189, 195, 

Reginald, abbot of, 285 . 

Robert, abbot of, 55, 56, 252. 

abbots of, 114, 115, 252 and . 

prior of, 133. 

sacrista of, 133, 268. 

Aberdeen, xiii, xlv, xlvi, xciv, 104, 

109, 212, 288-290 ; custom dues, Ixv ; 

school, Ivi ; Aberdeen bishops 

molesters of Lindores, 124-126. 
Andrew of, official of St. Andrews, 

70, 90. 

Gavin, bishop of, 299. 

Gilbert, bishop of, 65, 254. See 

also Stirling. 
John, bishop of, Ivi , 8, II, 88, 

89, 129, 236, 237, 262, 267. 

Malcolm, archdeacon of, 65. 

Matthew, bishop of, I, 5, 8, 231, 

237, 259, 284, 285. 

Matthew and S., chaplains of, 88. 

Richard, bishop of, 146, 290. 

See also Potton. 

Robert, dean of, 8, II, 236. 

Simon, archdeacon of, 8, 89, 236. 

William, parson of, 81. 

Abernethy (Abernythyn, Abirnethin), 

Iv, 252 n. 

Andrew, prior of, 55, 59, 253. 

Hughde, 171, 1 86. 

Maurice de, 72. 

prior of, 292. 

Abingdon, Ixxiv. 

Abirkedor, David of, 294. 

Abraham, the vill of, 42, 43, 248. 

Abraham * marus,' 167, 168 , 257. 

Abruthven, 252 n. 

Ada, daughter of William the Lion and 



spouse of Patrick, earl of Dunbar, 
235. 263. 

Ada, countess, daughter of William, 
earl of Warenne, and mother of 
David, earl of Huntingdon, xvi, 
xvii, 3, 7, 128, 130, 131, 259. 

daughter of David, earl of 

Huntingdon and spouse of Malise, 
earl P'erteth, xxv, xxvi and n ; 
xxxiv , xxxvi, xxxvii, xl and , liii, 
4, 18, 32, 38, 184, 230, 238, 247. 

Adam, clerk, 43, 145 and n. 

prior of Aberbrothoc, 59. 

Adel, 68. 

Adles (Adsles), Nicholas de, 92, 284. 

Adrian vi., pope, Ixxvii, 311. 

Alan, high steward and justiciar of 
Scotland, 242. 

son of Alan, 14, 30. 

son of Walter the steward, I, 233. 

'dapifer,' 284. 

larderer, 63. 

master, 35, 36. 

Albany, John, duke of, 310. 

Robert, duke of, Ivii. 

Albus, Simon, 13. 

Aldendoneche, 26, 242. 

Aldnecrage, 27. 

Alectum, xxxi. 

Alewin, servant of Roger de Berkeley, 

75- 

Alexander I., xv. 
Alexander n., xvi n, xxii, xxiii, xlv , 

2 5> 35. 36, 85, 150, 152, 243, 271, 

293- 
Alexander in., lix, Ixxv, 147, 150-152, 

155, 171, 221, 243, 253, 271, 273, 

276, 282, 289, 291. 
Alexander, prince, son of Alexander 

ill., 304. 
Alexander iv., pope, xciv, xcv, 277, 

289, 290, 303. 
Alexander VI., pope, Ixxvn. 
j Alnwick, xv. 

\ Alwentun, William de, Ixxiv. 
Anand, Adam de, 189, 193. 
Anas(Aness), Nicholaus de, 12, 14, 17, 

237. 

333 



334 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



Anderson, Walter, 218. 

Andrea, David de, 62. 

Anecol, 47. 

Anegus, 38. 

Angus, Gilchrist, 3rd earl of, I, 231. 

Gillibrede, 2nd earl of, I, 231. 

William of, abbot of Lindores, 

294, 308, 309- 

Anketyn, 94, 138, 264. 

Annan, li. 

Annand, David, of Ouchterellon, 273. 

Anvers, Baldwin de, 23, 97. 

Appelby, Galfred de, 21, 23, 94, 97, 

138. 

Applecross, Ixxxii. 
Aquinas's Surnnia Theologica, 322. 
Arbroath. See Aberbrothoc. 
Arbroth, Alan, 225. 

David, 225. 

Arbuthnott, Iv. 

Ardersier, 331. 

Ardoch, 243, 245. 

Ardros, Brice de, 31. 

Arduuen (Ardoyne), I, 231. 

Arnald, a dyer, 73. 

Arrocb, Agnes of, 158, 159. 

Aschirche, Henry de, 28, 244. 

Asylum, privilege of, 234. 

Atholl, Alan Durward, earl of, 258. 

See also Durward. 
Henry, earl of, 79, 258 ; Conan, 

his son. See Glenorchy. 

Malcolm, earl of, I, 231. 

Aubigny, William de, xxxiv, xxxvii. 
Auchterarder (Ouchyrardour), 25, 26, 

242. 
Auchtermuchty (Ochtirmokadi), 292, 

293. 299, 306. 
Auchynleke, John de, 227. 
Audideleger, Adam de, 22. 
Andre (Audereye), David de, 21, 39. 
Ayr, Iv. 
Azzolinus, Fortius, 315. 

BAILLARD, PETER, 131. 
Balbuthan (Balbithan), 163, 274. 
Balcomy, William de, 72. 
Balemagh (Balemawe), xl , 13, 38, 

230, 238, 247, 293. 
Balfour, James, of Denmylne and 

Kinnaird, Ixxxvi and ;;, 274, 305. 
John, of Dene-mylne, 312. 

Patrick, of Dene-mylne, 300, 

312. 

Balhagerdyn (Balhaggardy), 21, 153, 

240, 272. 
Ballingall, Agnes, 300. 

Alexander, 300. 

Balliol, Devorgulla de, I, 304. 



Balliol, Gocelin, xxvi, Ixviii, Ixxxviii, 

152, 271. 

John, xxv, Ixviii, 152, 153, 304. 

William de, 28. 

! Balmerino, xvi , 304, 306. 
| Balmyle, Nicholas de, bishop of Dun- 
blane, xxxviii, 305. 
Banquhory Terny, 290. 
Barclay, David, of Cullerny, 301. 
Barnabas, St., feast of, 145, 190, 269, 

280. 

Barnbougle, Linlithgowshire, 293, 307. 
Barnes. See Bernes. 
! Bartholormeis, Henry de, cardinal of 

Ostia, 314. 
: Bartholomew a monk, 17. 

dean of Fyf, 189. 

Basingh, Robert de, 16, 17. 
i Bassenthwaite, li. 
Basset, Robert, 5, 8, 10, 12, 14-17, 

93, 129, 236, 284. 
Batayle, John de la, 74, 257. 
Bath, Ixxiv. 
Beaumont, Roger de, bishop of St. 

Andrews, Ix, 5, 128, 233, 234, 257, 

267, 284. 
Beaumys or Beumys, Hugh de, 42, 43, 

6 1, 68, 176, 1 86, 279. 
Becard or Bekard, John, 170, 176, 180, 

188. 
Belle-Perche, Pierre de, bishop of 

Auxerre, 316. 

Bellus, Theobald de, 94, 138. 
Bene, James, bishop of St. Andrews, 

174, 278. 

Benedict xin., pope, 283, 294, 309. 
Benuer, Thomas of, 63. 
Benvie, 235. 
Beny (Bennie), Ixxxii, 29, 30, 58, 

59, 244, 245, 253, 299, 300, 311, 

312. 
Berkeley, Hugo de, 43, 171, 248. 

Margaret, spouse of Roger, 74- 

Roger de, 74, 75, 84, 257. 

Walter de, 75, 78, 284. 

Bernard, 22. 

Bernes (Barnes) in the Garioch, 163, 

274. 
Bernham, David de, bishop of St. 

Andrews, Ix, Ixx, Ixxiii, 68, 69, 131, 

255, 265, 268, 277. 
Berry-hill, 300. 
Bervie. See Inverbervyn. 
Berwick, 103, 109, 288. 
Berwick-on-Tweed, Iv. 
Betun, Robert de, 17. 
Beuel, William, 14. 
Beumys. See Beaumys. 
Beyuile, Henry de. See Boyuille. 



INDEX 



335 



Bishoprics, establishment of, xiii ; ap- 
pointments to, made by the popes, 

Ixxviii. 
Bisset (Byset, Byseth), John, 25. 

sir Robert, 145. 

Walter, 177, 271. 

William, of Merton, 230. 

Blaby, Hugh de, 94. 

'Black Agnes,' spouse of Thomas 

Randolph, earl of Moray, 278. 
Blakeburne, William de, 90. 
Bobo, cardinal-deacon of St.Theodorus, 

in, 265. 
Boiamund's valuation of ecclesiastical 

property, xlvii-xlix. 
Bondes, 146, 147, 270. 
Bondington, church of, 252 n. 

lands, 142, 269, 290. 

William de, bishop of Glasgow, 

52,55,57,58,251. 
Bonytoune of Rayne, 300, 311. 
Borg (Borgue), 138, 269. 
Borthwick, John, 312. 
Bosco, William de, 98, 243. 
Bourc, Roger, 170, 188. 
Boverdyn (Bourty), I, 230, 237. 

Robert de, 22. 

Bower, abbot of Inchcolm, xxiv. 
Boyuille (Bouilla), Henry de, 8, n, 19- 

21, 62, 65. 

Simon de, 62, 65. 

Brad, Thomas de, 189, 195. 

Brand, rev. John, secretary to society 

of antiquaries, London, 328. 
Brechin, xiii, Ixvi, 212, 290, 322. 

Albin, bishop of, 289. 

Gregory, bishop of, 1, Iv, 66, 116, 

255, 266, 288. 
Henry of, son of David, earl of j 

Huntingdon, xxvi, xxvii and, Ixxxii 

11, 23, 66, 67, 93, 94, 97, 236, 

237, 255. 
Radulph, bishop of, 8, 129, 236, \ 

267. 

Robert de, 146. 

William of, grandson of David, 

earl of Huntingdon, Ixix, Ixxv, 42, 

43, 60, 61, 66, 68, 142, 176, 248, 

253, 2 55> 26 4, 269, 279. 
Brice, chaplain, 88. 
clerk to Robert, earl of Strathern, 

3 1 - 

parson of Crefe. See Crefe. 

Briton, Hugo, 167, 275. 

Bruce, Alexander, of Stenhouse, 243. 

Christian, 281. 
Bruces of Clackmannan, 240. 
Brus, Bernard, of Cunnington, 239. 
Edward de, 164. 



Brus, Isabella de, daughter of David, 
earl of Huntingdon, and spouse of 
Robert Brus, lord of Annandale, 
xxv, Ixiii, 41, 239, 240, 248, 277. 

John de, 19, 20, 240. 

Robert, lord of Annandale, xxv, 
Ixviii, Ixxv, 145, 147, 239, 240, 248, 
270, 291, 328. 

son of Robert, lord of An- 
nandale, xxv, 42. 



Buch, Gillandres, 167. 

Buchan, Alexander Comyn, earl of, 

43, 155, 165, 248, 272, 273, 275, 

304- 

Colban, earl of, I, 231. 

Fergus, earl of, xvi . 

John Stewart, earl of, Ivii. 

Marjory, countess of, 235. 

William Cumyn, earl of, 5, 235, 

261, 272. 

earldom of, 231, 232. 

Bull of Celestine in., 102. 

Innocent HI., 107. 

Honorius in., 114. 

Gregory ix., 115, 116. 

Innocent IV., 117-126. 

See also Papal Bulls. 
Burdeth (Burdet), William, 14-17. 
Burg, Walo de, 22. 
Burgo, John and Brice, chaplains of, 

88. 

Buscel, Reginald, 90. 
Butler (Pincerna), Hugo, 257. 
(Pincerna), Peter, 23, 88, 97, 

241. 

Butyl, Thomas de, archdeacon of Can- 
dida Casa, 226, 283. 
Butyler, Malcolm, 176. 
Byseth. See Bisset. 

CACHEPOL. See Utting. 
Caddon-Lea, 232. 
Cady, Richard, 227, 283. 
Caithness, xiii ; bishopric, Ixv. 

Andrew, bishop of, I, 231. 

Caling, li. 

Calvart, Stephen, 217, 224. 

Calvy, John, bailie of Newburgh, 300, 

301. 

Cambal, John, 224. 
Cambrun (Cameron), David de, 145, 

270. 
Carnbuskenneth, xv, 233, 252 and n ; 

parliament held at, 278, 306. 

Gilbert, abbot of, 305. 

Michael of, 306. 

P[eter], abbot of, 55, 57, 252. 
Camera, Simon de, 73. 



336 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



Camera, William de, 92, 93, 263. 
Cameron, John de, 227. 
Cameys or Cames, Radulf de, 12, 15- 
17- 

Stephen de, xxix n. 

Campania, Ralph de, 94, 138. 

Robert de, Ixiii, 19, 20, 23, 93, 

97, 137-139, 240. 

William de, Ixiii, 93, 94, 137, 

140, 240, 264. 
Campbell charters, xvi and n, 284. 

sir Neill, of Lochaw, 305. 

Campsie, church of, 229 n. 
Candida Casa or Whithorn, xv. 282. 
Cane and conveth, xxxiv, liv, 129, 131, 

132. See also Conveth. 
Canterbury, xv, Ixxiv, Ixxxi n, Ixxxiv. 
Cantilupe, bishop of Hereford, Ixxxiii. 

. 
Caps, privilege of wearing, by monks, 

Ixxxiv, 291. 
Cardynside, 184. 
Carel, William, dean of, 131. 
Carlingford, li. 
Carmichael, John, 301. 
Carnoto (Charteris), Thomas de, chan- 
cellor of Scotland, 132, 173, 277. 
Carny, 306. 
Carrick, Ixvi. 
Cartres, Adam de, 146. 
Caskyben, 146, 147, 270. 
Castello, Norman de, 42. 
Castleton de Borg, 138. 
Cathedrals, erection of, xiii. 
Gather Mothyl. See Kathermothel. 
Cathkin. See Cotken. 
Cauz, Matilda de, 255. 
Cavers, Andrew, abbot of Lindores, 
296, 297, 299 and n, 310. 

Dionisius, 298. 

William, 298. 

Cecilia, daughter of Gilbert, earl of 

Strathern, xxxiv . 

Celestine in., pope, xl, xli , xlii, 
Ixxv, Ixxvii, Ixxxi , 102, 288 n, 302. 
Cellarer, the office of, 304. 
Celtic church, decay of, xiii, xiv. 
Ceres (Syreys), lix, 238. 
Chalmer, Dionisius, bailie of New- 
burgh, 297, 300. 

John, 329. 

William, 297. 

Charteris, sir Thomas of. See Carnoto. 
Charters, Andrew, 298. 
Cheeses, grant of, 113. 
Chen, Reginald de, chamberlain of 
Scotland, 168, 276. 

. son of Reginald, 169. 

Chester, earldom of, xxvi. 



Chester, Hugh, earl of, xxi. 

John, earl of. See Huntingdon. 

Ranulph, earl of, xxi. 

Chetewind, Philip de, 1 80. 
j Chirographtim, 154, 272. 
i Christian, magister, 29, 48, 59. 
daughter of Ferteth, earl of 

Strathern, xxxiv n, 246. 
Cistercian* nunnery at Elcho, Ixxxvi, 

Ixxxviii. 

Clashbennie. See Glasbanin. 
Claypottys, Dundee, 293. 
Clement v. , pope, 305. 
Clement VI., pope, Ixxvii, 292. 
' Clement vn., pope, 294, 308. 
Clerk alias Vobster, Robert, burgess of 

Perth, 298. 

Cletheueis (Clavage), 43, 44, 113, 249. 
Cletheueys, Gilescop de, 29, 244. 
Clinton, William de, earl of Hunting- 
don, Ixxii n. 
Clonyn, Madith of, 79. 
Cockburn (Kokbrun), John de, 184. 
Codilstane (Coldstone), 294 and n. 

Simon, rector of, 294. 

Coggeshall, monastery of, 231. 
Cokyn, John, 74. 

; Colban, earl. See Buchan, earl of. 
Colbrandspade, Ixvi. 
Colcrike (Colcric), 1 1, 82,. 83, 85, 237, 

260. 

Coldingham monastery, 303. 
Coldstream, xv. 
Collessie (Cullessy), Iviii-lx, 98, 169, 

171, 184, 187, 189-194, 291. 

John, chaplain of, 72. 

Comyn, Walter. See Menteith, earl 

of. 
Conan, son of Henry, earl of Atholl. 

See Glenorchy. 
Concrag, ixxxii, 29, 30, 58, 59, 244, 

253- 
Conington or Cunington, 1 and ;/, 16, 

103, 109, 167, 239, 275. 
Conredium, 129, 267. 
Consuetudines Feudorttm, 315. 
Conveth, 49, 50, 250. See also Cane 

and Conveth. 
Cornhill, Juliana de, spouse of Henry 

of Brechin, Ixxxii, 66, 67, 255. 

Reginald de, 255. 

Cotken or Cathkin, 31, 245, 299, 300, 

3", 312. 

Cotton, sir Robert, 239. 
Coule, Patrick, 225. 
Coventry, Ixxiv. 

John de, of Mukdrum, 297. 

Walter de, 292. 

Crafford, Robert de, 1 80. 



INDEX 



337 



Crafford, Roger de, 1 80. 
Cragmill, Ixxxviii and , 295, 301. 
Cragy, in Barnbougle, 307. 

Eister, in Barnbougle, 293. 

or Cragyn (near Dundee), lands 

of, xxv, 41, 42. 

Milltown of, 42, 248, 293. 

Crail, 288. 

Crailing, 235. 

Crawfurd lands, 236, 246. 

Crefe, Brice, parson of, 33, 34, 47, 49, 

51, 250. 

Malise, parson of, 31. 

Cremond (Creymond), Ixviii, Ixix, 62, 

64, 1 68, 241, 254, 276. 
Criech, Fife, 294. 309. 
Cristin, clerk to Robert, earl of Strath- 

ern, 31. 

Crukschank, Stephen, 225. 
Crusaders, privileges of, 156, 273. 
Culross, 252. 
Culsalmond (Culsamuel), xli, xlii, xlv, 

xlvii, xlix, Ixi, 3, 8, 10, 18, 103, 109, 

182, 184, 300. 

Cumyn, Alexander. See Buchan, earl of. 
Elena, spouse of William of 

Brechin, 176, 279. 

Fergus, 157, 186. 

John, 171. 

Richard, 84, 261. 

Robert, 177. 

William. See Buchan, earl of. 
157, 284. 

Cungertune, Walter de, 40. 
Cunigburch, Thomas de, 86. 
Cunigtone. See Conington. 
Cunningham, Ixvi. 

John, of Brownhill, xcii. 

John de, 133. 

William of, vicar of Dundonald, 

33- 
Cupar in Angus, abbey of, xvi, 258. 

Adam, abbot of, 302. 

Andrew, abbot of, 157, 272, 273. 

Curelundyn, 135, 136, 269. 
Cyriacus, St., 238. 

DAIRSIE (Deruasyn), 190, 195, 280. 
Dalgarnoc, William de, 189, 195. 
David I., xv, xvi, xxvii, li, 3, 275. 
David ii., 173, 196, 201, 203, 204, 206, 
230, 247, 27 1 , 278, 280, 293, 306, 307. 
David, earl. See Huntingdon, earl of. 

son of earl David, xxv n, xxvii, 
3. 8, 233. 

chaplain, 10. 

'oiselarius,' 39, 247. 

' Dean of Christianity,' Ivi and , 159. 
Dedication of altars, Ixiii and n. 



Deer, monastery of, Ixxviii, 232. 
; Den-Finella, falls of, 238. 
Denmylne, Ixxxvi, Ixxxviii, 300. 
Derech, Simon, 26. 
Deruasyn. See Dairsie. 
Dettauerley, Hugh de, 92. 
Devorgulla, spouse of John Balliol, 

xxv, xxvi, Hi . 

Doesblare (Dis-blair), 169, 276. 
Dolepain or Holepen, Gilbert, 10, 15- 

17, 236. 

William, 236. 

Donidor (Dunnideer), 153, 272. 
Donyn (Dunyn), Brice de, 29, 31. 
Dornoch, Ixxxii. 

Douenald, brother of Kineth, 32. 
Douglas, earl of, 202, 205, 206. 

Isabella de, lady of Mar, 294. 

James, 9th earl of, 310. 

William, earl of, 281. 

Drayton, 236. 
Drem chapel, Ixxiii. 
Drostan, St., 65, 254. 
Drumendufelis, 49, 251. 
Drumgreve, Robert de, 186. 
Drummond, John of, 233. 
Dryburgh, xv. 

Dryden, Robert de, 227, 283. 
Dull, Ixxxii, 231. 
Dunbar, monastery, 235. 

Gavin, bishop of Aberdeen, 311. 

Patrick, 5th earl of, 5, 92, 235, 

263. 

6th earl of, 25, 242. 

7th earl of, 275. 

9th earl of, 278. 

Waldeve, earl of, I, 229, 231, 

263. 

Dunbernyn(Dunbarny), 78, 258. 

John of, 80. 

Reginald de, 47. 

j Dunblane, xiii, xxxviii, liii, Iv, 52, 53, 

56, 57, 113, 292. 
Abraham, bishop of, 33, 34, 43- 

52, 76, 133, 172, 245, 246, 249, 250, 

258. 

Alpin, bishop of, xxxviii. 

Clement, bishop of, 26, 30, 31, 

37, 48, 53. 54, 55, 57-59, 244, 245, 

246, 250, 251. 
Galfrid, bishop of, 244. 

Gilbert, archdeacon of, 29, 33, 

34, 43, 45, 48, 49, 51, 55, 57, 76. 

John, archdeacon of, 165. 

dean of, 177. 

Tonathan, bishop of, 129. 

Luke, archdeacon of, 31, 58, 59. 



Osbert, bishop of, 246. 

; Ralph, bishop of, 53, 246. 



338 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



Dunblane, Robert, bishop of, 171, 277. 

W., dean of, 59. 

William, bishop of, xxxviii. 

Dunbulg, Thomas, chaplain of, 72. 

Duncan, earl. See Fife, earl of. 

son of Malise, 34. 

'judge,' 157. 

Dundee, xxxi, xxxiv, xl, xh and n, 
xlvi, xciv, i, 3, 7, 18, 22, 95, 97, 
103, 108, 116-118, 181, 184, 229, 
230, 238, 266, 290, 294, 322 ; schools 
in, Iv, 288 ; St. Clement's church, 22, 
141; mob from, sacks Lindores, 312. 

Albert of, 42. 

Philip, clerk of, 14. 

William, parson of, 39, 88. 

Dundemore (Dunmore), Ixx and , 
69, 71, 108, 255, 256. 

Henry de, Ixx and , 19, 20, 

6 1, 69, 240, 256. 

John de, 71, 148, 256, 271, 306. 

Dundonald, William, vicar of, 330. 

Dundrennan, xv. 

Dunfermline, xv, xxxv, Ixvi, Ixxvii, 
Ixxviii, Ixxxiv, 231, 294, 308, 309. 

Archibald, abbot of, 237. 

N., abbot of, 159, 161, 274. 

abbot of, Ixxxvi, n, 118, 123. 

Dunkeld, xiii, liv, Iv, Ixvi, 35, 36. 
H., archdeacon of, 36. 

Henry, canon of, 299. 

Hugh, bishop of. See Sigillo. 

John, bishop of, 5, 129, 284, 235. 

Nazar, chaplain of, 35, 36. 

Richard, bishop of, 171, 277. 

William, chaplain of, 35, 36. 

archdeacon of, 133, 136. 

treasurer of, 99. 

Dunmernoch, 25, 242. 
Dunnideer. See Donidor. 
Dunyn, Brice de. See Donyn. 
Durandus's Speculum Jitdiciale, 316, 

321. 
Durham, Ixxx n ; battle of, 292, 306. 

. prior of, 303. 

Durnach (Logic - Durno), xli, xlvii, 

xlviii n, xlix, Ixi, i, 8, 18, 22, 23, 

85, 97, 103, 109, 181, 184, 230 and 

, 237. 

Richard, vicar of, 86. 
Durward, Alan, justiciar of Scotland, 

26, 85, 145, 242, 243, 258, 261. 

sir Colin, 86. 

Margery, daughter of Alexander 

n. and spouse of Alan Durward, 

85, 243. 

Thomas, 145. 

Dysart, Katherine, spouse of John 

Calve, 301. 



EARNSIDE. See Hyrneside. 
Ebedyn. See Abdie. 
Eccles, xv. 

Eddun, Nicholas de, 86. 
Edduy, William de, 90. 
Eden (Edyn) moor, 175, 276. 

moss, 177, 185. 

Edeneburg, Henry of, 66. 
Edengerrock, Ixviii, 62, 254. 
Ederlarg (Edderlick), 61, 241, 254. 
Edoyna, spouse of Gilbert de Haya, 

84, 260, 261. 

Edward I., 276, 304, 305. 
Edyne. See Eden. 
Eglesgirg (St. Cyrus), xxxiv, xl, Ixxiii, 

13,238. 
Eglesmagril (Exmagirdle), xxxvi, liv, 

Iv, Ixxv, Ixxxviii, 43, 47-50, 52, 54, 

5 6 , 57, 74, 76, 77, 78, 113, 172, 249, 

296, 301. 

Patrick, parson of, 48, 77. 

Eglisfeld, John de, 190, 195. 
Eilan (Ellon), 232. 

! Elcho (Elyoch, Elchok), 274, litiga- 
tion with Lindores, Ixxxvi-lxxxviii. 

Agnes, prioress of, 158-160. 

Elena, relict of William of Brechin, 

176, 279. 
Elgin, Iv. 
Elphinstone, Janet, spouse of Robert 

Leslie, 331. 
1 Ely, IxxivV 
! Elyas, servant to Robert Griffin, 

41. 

chaplain, 32. 

Elyoch. See Elcho. 

Engleys, Henry, 146. 

Ermengard, queen of William the Lion, 

xvi , xxi, 3, 7- 
Ernaldus, chaplain, 14. 
Errol (Herrol), 233, 242, 253. 

rector of, 84. 

I William, earl of, 310. 

Erskyne, Robert de, 293. 

Essy, Richard, rector of, 157. 

Estir Cragy, in Barnbougle, 293. 

Estleye, William de, 94. 

Ethna, spouse of David de Haya, 82, 

260. 

i Ethueny, Gille, 26. 
j Ethyweyn, 179. 
I Eugene, clerk, 35, 36. 
Eva, daughter of Gartnait and spouse 

of Colban, earl of Buchan, 231. 
| spouse (2nd) of David de Haya, 

82, 260. 
Everley, John de, canon of Dunkeld, 

124, 126, 289. 
Evesham, Ixxiv, 324. 



INDEX 



339 



Ewyn, son of Conan of Glenorchy, 79, 

259- 

Excommunicated John, 86, 261. 
Excommunications, Ixxxiii and n. 

FAIRKUL, JAMES, xcii. 

Falaise, treaty of, xix, xx, 231. 

Falkland castle, 309. 

Fedale, Ixviii, Ixxxii, Ixxxviii, 25-28, 

58, 59, 133, 136, 242, 243, 253. 

eister and wester, 300, 312. 

westere, 25, 26. 

Simon de, 26. 

Gillemury, son of Simon, 26. 

Fefwerel, Radulf de, 79. 

Fergus, son of Gilbert, earl of 

Strathern, xxxiv n, xxxvii, Ixviii, 26, 

27, 3i 33, 34, 37, 48, 49, 5', S&, 59, 

243, 245- 

steward of Fergus, 28. 

P'erhare 'judge,' 62. 

Fermartyn, 276. 

Ferteth, son of earl Gilbert, xxxiv n. 

Fife, A., earl of, 129, 268. 

Bartholomew, dean of, 189, 195. 

Duncan, earl of, xvi , xxxiv ;/, 

. i, 5, 11, 231, 237, 284, 292, 293, 306. 
Fintray (Fintreth), xl, xli, xlvii, xlviii n, 

xlix, Ixi, Ixxxviii, xciv, I, 3, 8, 1 8, 

103, 108, 181, 184, 200, 201, 230, 

237, 289. 

Richard, vicar of, 63. 

Fischerhill, 300. 

Fisheries, 4, 11, 81-85, 97, "3 181, 

.234- 

Fitun. See Phyton. 
Fitz-Alan, Walter, justiciar of Scotland, 

xv, 25. 
Fitz-Ronald, Alan, lord of Galloway, 

Iviii n, 276. 

Helen, daughter of, spouse of 

Roger de Quincy, 276. 

Flanders, in Garioch, Ixxv, 148, 150, 
167, 271, 275, 293, 294, 329. 

Fleming, Bartolomew, Ixix, 65> 91, 
146. 

Edward, 184. 

Everard, 4 and n, 18. 

Simon, 8. 

Fliske, William de, 186, 
Fochabers, 247. 
Fodinrey, Robert de, 72. 
Fodringham, Thomas, 299. 
Foleville, Anketill de, 19, 23, 97, 264. 
Forest, William de, 98. 
Forfar, 104, 109, 288. 

sir Roger de, 176. 

Forgrund or Langforgrund, Carse of 
Gowrie, I, 229, 230, 256. 



Forgrund (Forgandenny), near Exma- 

girdle, 74, 230, 257. 

Adam, parson of, 78. 

Patrick, vicar of, 75. 

Forrett, Margaret, spouse of James 

Philp of Ormestoun, 301. 
Forteviot, 242. 

Fotheringhay castle, xxii, xxiii. 
Fovern, Waldeve, rector of, 157. 
Fowler, David. See Oiselarius. 
Frankeleyn, Henry le, 94, 264. 
Fraser, Bernard, Ixxiii, 271. 
William, bishop of St. Andrews, 

196 , 273. 

Furthrit, David of, 8l. 
Fyntre. See Fintray. 
Fyvie, xvi n. 

GALEWATH, MICHAEL of, 79. 

Galloway, xiii. 

Alan, lord of, xxv, Hi, 242. 

Alexander, canon of Aberdeen, 

300. 

William, 300. 

Garentully, Simon de, Ixvii, Ixix, 21, 

22, 25, 61, 62, 64, 65, 90, 241, 254. 
Garioch (Garviach), xxxiv, Ixvii, I, 7, 

9, 18, 24, 103, 108, 114, 115, 197, 

199-204, 226, 230, 239, 293. 
valuation of ecclesiastical property 

in, xlviii-1. 

earldom of, 229. 

lordship of, 281. 

Andrew de, 146. 

Cask, Malise, parson of, xxxiv, 30, 48, 

58 ; synod of Cask crist, 59, 253. 

Ysenda de, xxxiv n. 

Gaufrid, clerk of earl David, 15, 16. 
Giffard, John, 40. 

Richard, 248. 

William, 284. 

Gigan (Gygan), Thomas, 82, 83. 
Gilbert, earl. See Strathern, earl of. 
son of earl Gilbert, xxxiv n, xxxvii, 

28, 31, 247. 

son of the judge of Strathern, 

32. 

son of Gocelin, 8l. 

clerk, 11, 68. 
Gilchrist, son of earl Gilbert, xxxiv n t 

xxxvii. 

Gillandreston (Glanderston), 65, 254. 
Gillebaran, chaplain, 58. 
Gillebride, 27. 
Gillecostentyn, 26. 
Gillefalyn, son of Gillebride, 27. 
Gillemor, son of Anecol, 47. 
Gillenem, steward of earl Gilbert, 47, 

49. 



340 



THE CHARTULARY OF LINDORES 



Gillethomas, son of Malise, 34 and n. 
Glasbani (Clashbennie), 81-83, 85, 260. 
Glasgow, xiii, Iv ; bishopric, Ixvi ^ ; 

cathedral, xxxv. 

Hugh, dean of, 52, 55, 58. 

Jocelin, bishop of, I, 5, 231, 235, 

284. 

Robert, treasurer of, 52, 55, 58. 

William, bishop of. See Bond- | 

ington. 

Glastonbury, Ixxiv, Ixxxiv. 
Glencarny, Gilbert de, 37, 247. 
Glenlicherne, 133, 269. 
Glenluce, xv. 
Glenorchy, 258. 
Conan of, son of Henry, earl of i 

Atholl, 79, 258. 

Gloucester, Gilbert, earl of, 270. 
Gloves, 153, 272. 
Gogare, Augustine de, priest, 294. 
Golin, William of, 76. 
Gordon of Barnes, 274. 

John de, Ixv. 

Gracian, cardinal deacon, in. 

Graham, Oliver de, 82, 83. 

Patrick, bishop of St. Andrews, j 

296. 

Grange, Fife, 297, 300. 
Great Durnach, 230 . 
Gregory IX., pope, Ixi, Ixxvi, Ixxx, 52, | 

115, 116, 251. 
Gregory of St. Maria inaquiro, cardinal i 

deacon, in. 
Gregory of St. George, cardinal deacon, j 

in. 
Griffyn, Mabel, wife of Robert, 41. 

Robert, 41, 248. 

Griser, Henry, 40. 

Grynlaw, Nicolas, 225. 

Gualo, papal legate, 303. 

Gubiun, William, 14. 

Guido, first abbot of Lindores. See 

Lindores. 

cardinal priest, in. 

Guisborough, li and . 
Gygan. See Gigan. 

HACK, PETER DE, 17. 

Haddington, nunnery at, xvi. 

Hall of Witstoun, 300. 

Halsingtun in the Merse. Ixxiv. 

Haltoun, 299. 

Halyburtoun, George, 301. 

Hamildun, 92, 113, 263. 

Hamilton, Patrick, abbot of Feme, 311. 

Harcaris, Alan de, 186. 

Hastynges, Henry de, xxv, Ixviii, Ixxv, 

148, 150, 271. 
John de, 79. 



Hath, son of Gilbrid, 79, 259. 
Hathintown, David, 296, 329. 
Hathirwych (Heatherwick), 163, 274. 
Haut thuysille, John de, 131. 
Haya, David de, of Errol, 39, 73, 81, 

83, 84, 129, 247, 256, 260, 261. 
84, 260, 261. 

Edoyna, spouse of Gilbert de 

Haya, 84, 260, 261. 

Ethna, spouse of David de Haya, 

82, 260. 
Eva, spouse (2nd) of David de 

Haya, 82, 260. 
Gilbert de, of Errol, 37, 43, 61, 

82, 83, 253, 256, 260, 261, 289 , 

305- 
Helen, daughter of Gilbert, earl 

of Strathern, and spouse of William 

de Haya, xxxiv. 
John de, 26, 61, 73, 242, 243, 253, 

256, 271. 

Juliana, spouse of John de Haya, 

Malcolm de, parson of Errol, 82, 

84, 260, 261. 

Ni